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Full text of "Harbinger"

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WILLIAM RAINEY-HARPER COLLrGE 



THE HARBINGER 



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V0L!J[^1E 7 
1973-74 



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Vol. 7, no. 1 



William raincy harper college — palatine illinois 



Sept. 10. 1973 




Fate of Harper^s burned-out 
fieldhouse inJValker^s hands 



Flamefi leap In air at Fieldhouse fire June 9. 
Photo reproduction by permlwilon of Paddock Publ. 



By PHIL BATTAGLIA 

Dr. Lahti. In hU efforts to 
attain financial aid for the 
recently destroyed Physical 
Education plant, held a two 
hour session with Governor 
Daniel Walker of the State of 
Illinois. The meeting, held on 
August 31 was also attend- 
ed by Dr. William J. Mann 
(Vice President Business Af- 
fairs), Marc Savrad (Direc- 
tor of Special Services). Mrs. 
Marilyn Marier, William 
Kelly (Trustee). Demotratic 
Representative, Mrs. Eugen- 
ia S. Chapman, Senator 
David J. Regner and Dan- 
iel Pierce. 

During this meeting with 
Governor Walker, no defin- 
ite decision was established, 
but the lines of communica- 
tion were left open. The Gov- 



Svpporffve serviies avaihbk to hearing impo/reif 

By DIANE DiBARTOLOMEO 



Randy Red is enrolled in 
the Business Administrative 
transfer program at Harper 
This Is his second year he 
will be attending classes 
full-time andllke many Har- 
per students holds down a 
part time job So . what nuikea 
Randy's story stand out a- 
mong others'* Randy Is deaf. 
In his senior year at Her- 
aey. Randy was directed to 
Harper through an 

official at his school 

Harper officials developed 
the plan for supportive ser- 
vices in cooperation with 
officials in the deaf pro- 
gram at Hersey. and with 
parents of deaf children and 
persons who work with the 
problems of the deaf in Illi- 
nois It is now possible for 
hearing Impaired individ- 
uals like Randy, to select 
any curriculum offered at 
Harper 

Supportive services will 
be made available to some 
twenty hearing Impaired 
Harper students this fall 
These services include help 
from interpreters, notetak- 
ers and tutors "The ser- 
vices will make It possible 
for them to t ike as compre- 
hensive a schedule as their 
abilities permit. " statedLiz 
McKay, director of Environ- 
mental Health at Harper Col- 
lege. 

"At the present time there 
are thirty- two hearing im- 
paired -students known to the 



sute of Illinois Division of 
Vocational Rehabiliutlon. 
who are currently enrolled 
In post secondary schools 
outside the state. McKay 
stated, because Illinois does 
not have adequate compre- 
hensive educational re- 
sources for these students. 
With the initiation of suppor- 
tive services at Harper Col- 
lege, this will no longer bea 
problem for these students " 

The objectives of the sup- 
portive services for the 
hearing impaired at Harper 
are; 

-To make a community 
college degree available to 
hearing impaired citizens 

-To enable the hearing 
impaired citizens to take 



courses for personal infor- 
mation and enrichment. 

-To allow those hearing 
impaired persons who desire 
a four -year college degree to 
enter a transfer program in 
order to pursue such a de- 
gree. 

■ To provide an opportunity 
for the hearing Impaired stu- 
dent to enter a career pro- 
gram to prepare for his 
vocational choice. 

When asked for his view of 
the success of the program. 
Randy commented that he is 
definitely succeeding in hav- 
ing "a good time with the 
girls " 

It seems as though Randy 
is not going to be kept from 
having a good education or a 
good time at Harper this fall. 




Dr. Catherine Kalbacker, an instructor of the deaf, 
helps to translate the thoughts of Randy Red, a deaf 
student at Harpet^to IWane DlBartolomeo, Harbinger Ed- 
Itor-ln-Chief, during an interview. 

Photo by L. R. Kiel 



emor was very open minded 
and also stated. "He was 
very sympathetic to our 
cause." He asked Dr. Lah- 
ti and the conr»mittee. "If 
they could come up with a 
different alternative." 

Dr. Lahti stated. "This 
is a very crippling situation. 
Even if we were to receive 
the funds today It would 
take two to three years to 
complete construction on 
the building. If not receiv- 
ed, it would take anywhere 
from seven to ten years." 
Taken from a report pre- 
sented to Governor Walker 
the following was stated: 

"In looking for possible 
sources of state funding, 
Harper College officials in 
conjunction with members 
of the General Assembly who 
represent the geographical 
area of the state served by 
the college determined that 
legislative action was clear- 
ly needed to meet the col- 
lege's emergency situation. 
The guideline set forth by 
the UCB was fully under- 
stood and respected in this 
endeavor. Senator David 
Regner felt that the best ap- 
proach would be an em- 
ergency appropriation from 
the General Revenue Fund. 
Precedent tfad been estab- 
lished for this action by the 
General Assembly's approv- 
al two years ago of an 
emergency appropriation 
for Western Illinois Univer- 
sity under similar circum- 
stances. It was felt that this 
approach would not disturb 
regular capital appropri- 
ations for other junior col- 
lege construction projects. 
The central theme of Har- 
per's appeal to the General 
Assembly was that this case 
was an emergency and 
should be treated as a sep- 
arate individual problem. 

With these facts in mind. 
Senator Regner introduced 
SB 1199 on June 19 with 
the co-sponsorhlp of Sen- 
ators Bradley Glass, John 
Nimrod, and John Graham. 
The bill received a unani- 
mous "do pass" recommen- 
dation in the Senate Ap- 
propriations Committee 
and was passed by the Sen- 
ate on June 22 by a vote 
of 41-2. Representative Eu- 
genia Chapman was the chief 
sponsor in the House and 
received direct assistance 
from Representatives Don- 



ald Totten. Virginia Mac- 
Donald and Leo LaFleur. 
The bill received a unani- 
ous "do pass" recommen- 
dation by the House Ap- 
propriations ConviYiittee and 
was passed by the House on 
July 1 by a vote of 119-1. 
It is important to note the 
overwhelming support 
which the bill received, since 
legislators represent all 
areas of the State and, in 
almost all cases, and they^ 

(Turn to page 7) 



Harper needs 
more PC's 

By KAREN PLONG 

Are you a new student 
here at Harper this fall and 
just a little bit confused? 
Maybe you're having trouble 
finding the location of some 
of your classes or mayt>e 
you're wondering if the 
classes you did choose are 
the right ones for you You 
shouldn't be surprised If 
someday soon one of Har- 
per's Peer Counselors ap- 
proaches you and strikes 
up a friendly conversation 
about what has t)een happen- 
ing on campus or something 
else to that effect 

Eight paraprofessional 
counselors carried on a 
project last year that l)e- 
gan in the spring in which 
a outreaqh effort was made 
to stud^hts who might not 
otherwise seek advice about 
personnel as mel\ as scho- 
lastic problems.Thls fall two 
of the eight peer counselors 
are returning to carry on 
with the project They are: 
Bernie Schwartz, a sopho- 
more from Buffalo Grove 
and Jackie Ehlebracht, al- 
so a sophomore, from Elk 
Grove Village 

A three week training per- 
iod from PCs provides a 
thorough briefing on Har- 
per's campus and facilities, 
as well as communications 
and human relations The 
PC's meet regularly with 
professional counselors to 
review the program's pro- 
gress The PC s work, on the 



average 
weekly. 

Anyone 
coming a 



about ten hours 



interested in be- 
PC .should contact 

either Anne Rodgers, Ext 

396 or Joyce Nolen. Ext. 

240, the coordinators of the 

program. 



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Page 2 



THE HARBINGER 



Sept. 10. 1973 



I »■ 



Sept. 10. 1973 



THE HARBINGER 



TIk(i W(g(ilk 

film PistorftncDini 



Page 3 



Swept out' 



LOS ANGELES (UPI) - 
Police Detective Lt. Ter- 
rance Hannon. 43, a veteran 
of 18 years on the force 
and a director of the Po- 
lice Protective League, was 
suspended after he was 
charged with propositioning 
one of the undercover po- 
licewomen dL Operation 
Clean Sweep, a police drive 
to rid Hollywood of prosti- 
tution, while he was off duty. 



Couple left 



SAN JOSE, Calif (UPI) - 
Two trans -sexuals. who met 
and fell in love while un- 
dergoing sex change opera- 
tions, want to get married 
but can't do so under Cal- 
ifornia law because one is 
a man who became a woman 
and the other a woman who 
became a man 

The couple, living togeth- 
er in an apartment in the 
San Francisco Bay city of 
San Jose have had their hopes 
of marriage dashed by the 
law which does not permit 
a change in the original birth 
certificate 

Jason Heckman. 33, and 




WonMit'i BiaM S to It 
MaTi aiaaa 28 to 42 Waist 
InaMitu. . .28 In . to 36 In. 

lBOY8'SIZEB6to 18 



TIUIUIBIJ'S 









Tonnea Vance, 24. met dur- 
ing a counseling session ar- 
ranged by Stanford Univer- 
sity Medical Center where 
each spent $5,000 for the 
series of operations over 
six months to malte their 
bodies conform to their men- 
tal attitudes 

Little fine 

ROCKLAND. Me (AP) - 
District Court Judge Paul 
A MacDonald fined James 
V, Peters 5 cents after he 
pleaded guilty to litter- 
ing a street with a soda 
bottle cap. 



Viwf)it fanhy leader bhsts ce/lege 
admimstratiou as 'uademecratk' 



Deco 



rum 



SALT LAKE CITY (UPI) 
- Sheriff Delmar Larson said 
female inmates of the Salt 
Lake County Jail had been 
lowering a blanket ladder 
out a window so male in- 
mates could climb one story 
up and have what he termed 
"sex parties." 

Larson added he didn't 
kakm if any laws had been 
broken.. 



lor WAYNOALYN RICE 

( Kepinted by permission of The Herald) 

The Harper College faculty lenate be- 
gan the school year yesterday with its 
president attacking the "undemocratic, 
monolithic administration" which he 
says threatens to turn the school into "an 
overblown, dispirited and generally bad 
institution." 

Katet PoweU, associate professor of 
EagHah and this year's faculty senate 
president, was greeted with warm ap- 
plause from 70 faculty members when he 
told them the faculty must work for a 
greater voice In determining how the col 
lege is run. Faculty members are on 
campus this week preparing for the 
opening o( classes Monday. 

The faculty senate is a non-union or^ 
ganization of the school's ISO fuU-tiaa 
faculty which deals with the riiJIm 
board annually in salary nmntiilinai. 
The board last spring adopted a salary 
plea far faculty members over the objec- 
tkm ef the senate. 

l^>Uowing his speech, PoweU said he 
was Bot n e e sas ari ly caUlng on the faculty 
I* Mieaiae. "TUt wu aimed at giving 
•OOM statlrtks to the faculty." he said 
"I dent kaew what can be done but I 
beUeve reasooabie men could change 
Uiings. ' 

AceordiBC to the College Bhie Beak. 
PsmO said. Harper is listed as among 
the » Khools having the highest (acuity- 



student ratio out of the 3,600 colleges and 
universities in the country. "We ar^ in 
the select company of the Missouri 
School of Religion and Soule CoUeg'e," he 
said. 

The result of the large classes and high 
faculty-student ratio, he said, is that 
teachers assign few essay exams and 
otiier written assignments to students be- 
cause of the prot>lem of grading. 

"There are those who argue that noth- 
ing is really thought out until it is written 
out or St least talked out. Thus tlie high- 
er rstio msy guarantee less student 
thought. I suspect that a Harper student 
wliea he leaves here has done less wrlt^ 
lag, leas talking through and hM had leaa 
fsculty criticism of his thougiit preceasM 
than students from other ooOefea in tba 
state, ' ha said. 

PoweU also cited a ease last spring 
where the administration passed over 
tweeaadidatae for the poaitka of dean of 

search committee, tba cmmtti^ alaS 
and the sdnol's departaMot heads la fa- 
vor of another peraoo. 

niat action sod other actions, he said, 
BMdto faculty participation In the school's 
adml nistrstion "s facade, a propaganda 
ftOBt to deceive the board and the North 

Central Assodatioe (an accrediting ac»'' 
cy)." 

(Turn to page 3) 



Chorus open to all 



Persons who enjoy sing- 
ing for fun will be interested 
in the formation by Harper 
College of a new community 
chorus The choir, which 
will present winter and 
spring concerts, will include 
a nucleus of members who 
already constitute many of 
the church and temple choirs 
and community singing 
groups in the northwest sub- 
urbs. 

Auditions will not be re- 
quired. The only require- 
ment is that participants en- 
Joy singing and are interest- 
ed in learning and expanding 
their musical abilities 

Director of the new Har- 
per Chorus is Anthony Mos- 
tardo. well known for his 



Stanfield represents veterans commission 



musical ej^pertise and his 
recent performing achieve- 
ments with another local mu- 
sic group he directs, the 
Elk Grove Festival Chorus 

Plans already underway 
for the winter concert in- 
clude the performance of 
VivaldJs "Gloria," a can- 
tata for soloists, choir, and 
chamber orchestra, and 
Fred Warlngs "The Song 
of Christmas. " a collection 
of famlliarChristmascarols 
featuring soloists, choir and 
narrator. 

The first rehearsal will be 
on Tuesday. September 11. 
from 7 45 to 10 15 pm on 
the Harper campus For fur- 
ther information contact Mr. 
Mostardo at 437-1137 or 
437-7581 




By RON ZOBlgRIS 

The Veteran s Affairs of- 
fice of Harper College is 
now represented by Darrell 
L Stanfield who is a repre- 
sentative of the Illinois Vet- 
eran s Commission Stanfield 
is prepared to assist vet- 
erans of the Northwest Sub- 
urban area with information 
on sute and federal benefits, 
as well as rights, to which 
'hey are entitled 

Fred Valsvil, director of 
the Harper College Place- 
ment Office said. "We had 
been asked a year ago if 
the college would be Inter- 
ested in providing space for 
a representative of the Illi- 
nois Veterans' Commission 
The Harper Administration 
offered to cooperate. It was 



in late May of this year that 
Darrell Stanfield was as- 
signed to the college office 
We feel it will be a con- 
venience for the community 
to have a source of veteran 
benefit information at the 
Harper College location" 
Stanfield. 26, is a May- 
wood resident. He will be at 
his Harper office in Build- 
ing A. room 351a Monday, 
Wednesday. Thursday and 
Friday The telephone exten- 
sion is 254 Aiding Stanfield 
are three Harper students 
who are veterans They are 
employed as outreach work 
ers operating out of the Har- 
per Veterans" Affairs Off ice 
Their primary concern is to 
contact veterans and volun- 
teer information on educa 
tional benefits. 



Clff s9mkHirs wd exams avoi7ff6/t 



Harper College In Pala- 
tine is holding a series of 
Saturday morning seminars 
for persons wishing to pre- 
pare for the College Level 
Examination Program 
(CLEP) tests. The Saturday 
CLEP seminar, from 9-12 
noon September 15 through 
January 19, is intended to 
give assistance in test tak- 
ing and will review material 
covered by the CLEP ex- 
aminations 

Practice tests will be ad- 
ministered, tips for taking 
tests will be given, and guest 
lectures from each academic 
area will conduct review 
sessions. 

Throigh the CLEP tests, 
individuals who have never 
attended college can take 



tests based on experience 
and prior knowledge and re- 
ceive academic credit tow- 
ard an undergraduate de- 
gree. ^ 

Those wishing to partici- 
pate in the CLEP seminar 
should contact the Continu- 
ing Education office at Har- 
per College, 397-3000. ex- 
tension 301. Students can 
register at the first class 
meeting in room D-213 on 
September 15 Registrations 
will be accepted through Sep- 
tember 22 Those wishing to 
take the monthly CLEP 
exams administered by Har- 
per College may call the 
office of testing services on 
extension 341 for informa- 
tion and testing dates. 



Wolker veto cuts college construction funds 



Gov. Daniel Walker, with 
the use of. his amendatory 
veto powers, has cut more 
than $6 million from a high- 
er education bill that would 
have provided Harper with 
funds for the construction of 
a number of proposed cam- 
pus buildings. 

Harper had asked for $2.2 
million for vocational and 
technical education facili- 
ties and $3,887 million for 
additional classroom facili- 
ties at the junior college. 

The governor, in conjunc- 
tion with the Illinois Bureau 
of the Budget and the Illinois 
Board at Higher Education, 
has decided to re -evaluate 
capital development con- 
struction projects for all 
institutions for higher learn- 
ing, so his action in effect 
means that all jtinior col- 



leges asking for capital im- 
provement funds in fiscal 
year 1974 will have to re- 
submit this capital develop- 
ment request to the Board 
of Higher Education's Capi- 
tal Development Board 
(CDB) and the Illinois Jun- 
ior College Board (UCB). 

Dr. William Mann, Har- 
per vice president tor busi- 
ness affairs, stated at the 
August 9 board of trustees 
meeting that "we're notget- 
ting our fair share of funds 
for buildings and classroom 
space from the Illinois Jun- 
ior College Board, based on 
their own formula." 

In a graph, presented by 
Mann, It showed that actual 
square footage of educational 
space at Harper either al- 
ready built or under con- 
struction is 433.556 sQuare 



feet, whereas the square 
footage generated by actual 
student enrollment at Harper 
should be 801,920 square 
feet, according to UCB for- 
mula. , 

He further stated that if 
the bill hadn't been vetoed 
by Walker, and if Walker 
doesn't veto the $1.65 mil- 
lion emergency appropria- 
tion for the physical educa- 
tion facility, already approv- 
ed by the'I JCB and" the CDB 
to replace the facility des- 
troyed by fire June 9, that 
the actual square footage 
built or under construction 
at Harper would be 682,- 
556 square feet by 1976. 

"This is still below the 
UCB formula." Mann said. 

In the meantime, excava- 
tion has begun on the Iterim 
physical education facility 



that will be used until the 
permanent athletic building 
is in operation. 

Mann related at the board 
meeting that Harper "had to 
turn away 1,100 vocational 
-technical students in 1973 
because we can't get the 
money to build a facility. 

"I disagree with the UCB 
philosophy regarding priori- 
ties for capital development 
funds. They decided their 
priority requests based on 
how much funding you've re- 
ceived for capital develop- 
ment in the past, rather than 
considering the student pop- 
ulation at a college and their 
educational needs,"' Mann 
said. 

Trustee Marilyn Marier 
said, "We have to continue 
to impress upon the UCB 
our educational needs." 



Reports Harper construction progress 



Harper College Truttees 
received aome guarded re- 
ports on tlic current construc- 
tion progress of two campus 
building projects at the 
board of trustees meetinR Au- 
gust 9. It's not too good. 

Konakl Halpert, senior-con- 
struction administrator for 
Caudill Rowlett Scott of Hous- 
ton, architects for the college, 
reported that construction on 
the P BuiMing and the D buikl- 
ing are 65 per cent completed, 
and that beneficial occupancy 
could be accompUshed by Feb- 
ruarv. 1974 

lYte two structures are part of 
Harper's Phase HA capital de- 
velopment project, which also 
indudea the constnicUon of a 
third campus parking lot and a 
perimeter road around the 
campus. 

The P Building will house 
Harper "s music classrcams and 
facilities, and the D Building is 
an addition to the present sci- 
#nce building on campus. 

Halpert reported xtistt existing 
parking lots A and B are ready 
for paving, tmt that parking lot 
C wa.! not, due to a dispute 

t>etween the goieral contractor 
of the Phase IIA project. Cciael - 



McGuire Industries, Inc., and 
the road construction con- 
tractor, the Rock Road Co. 

Many of the trustees, in- 
cluding Board President Jeasa- 
lyn Nicldas, expressed the hope 
that the building could be in full 
operation in tune for th^ spnng 
semester, but Halpert could not 
fl«lure laern me Doik&ngs woukl 
be completed in time. 

"The contract is a M day 
contract, which I consider too 
kxig to complete the work. But 
depending on the weather, the 
unions and the steel companies, 
it could legally go past our 
February estimate," Hapert 
said. 

Dr. William Mann, vice presi- 
dent of business affairs at Har- 
per, told Halpert, "We fully 
intend to use parking lots A and 
B by Sept. 10 (the sUrt of fall 
datses) and we fully Intend to 
park cars at parking lot C in the 
spring semester. So I hope this 
dispute gets settled ." 

Dr. Robert Lahti. presiden* of 
hittper College, reminded Hal- 
pert of the current lack of 
classroom space at the college, 
and Ui-ged him to try to resolve 
the difficulties between Ceisel • 



McGuire aji i Rock Road 

Ha^Mrt was also asked about 
progress with the U Building, 
the intrrim physical education 
fadlity designed to teanper a r i ly 
replace the farmer athletic fa- 
cility that was destroyed by fire 
June9. 

Haipert said that ocavatioa 
for the building had begun. He 
said steel for the foundation 
work would arrive soon, but 
ftisC delivery of die roof bar 
jobtM may be affected by the 
ataeirfMrU^e. 

The steel companies cant 
produce enough steel for the 
number of orders they're re- 
ceiving. This is the higge.'^t 
construction boom in a long 
time. The steel shortage couU 
delay the construction com* 
pletion date 

We cani build the rest of the 
building without the bar joints, 
because it affects the roof and 
wall structures," lie said. 

The construction of the U 
building IS l>eing dor.e by Archi- 
tectural Builders Co. of Chicago 
for $188,625. 

It had been hoped that the 
building would be ready for 
operation by December. 

The proposed struaure will 



conuin locker rooms, showers 
and storage space for mainte- 
nance equipment. Physical edu- 
cation faculty offices will also 
twinduded 

The U Building will only be 
able to meet part of the needs of 
the school's physical education 
degree prog ram 

Harper has an emergency bill 
on Gov. Daniel Walker's desk 
that if approved would provide 
the college with $1 .65 million f or 
a proposed S4,000-square-foot 
physical education facility 
called the M Building. 



frt-ifisckrrgf 

fdfCfffMe/ 
prefnia eveMIt 

By RON ZOBERIS 

Another first for Harper 
College. Starting this fall 
Harper's Office of Continu- 
ing Education is sponsoring 
a program with the cooper- 
ation of Glenvlew Naval Air 
Station to provide service- 
men aivl women with skills 
necessary for their pursuit 
to a college level education 
upon discharge from the 
military service 

This program will be con- 
ducted by the learning lab- 
oratory staff of Harper Col- 
lege. 

Here the pre-dlscharge 
student will be expected to 
carry 10 to 15 credit hours 
in a 16 week cycle. A total 
of 18 Junior college credit 
hours win be available un- 
der this program. 

The curriculum will in- 
clude basic arithmetic and 
algebra courses. Reading 
courses will provide an in- 
dividualized program de- 
signed to meet each stu- 
dent's needs as determined 
by diagnoetic and placemeitt 
testing 

Also there will be three 
conununication skills cours- 
es to provide missing links 
for students in areas of 
spelling, writing and vocab- 
ulary. Guidance will begiven 
toward educational and ca-/ 
reer goals as part at the 
p rogram . 



Harper's schedule for ID cards 

All full and part-time credit-enrolled students should 
have current student I.D. cards. They can be obtained 
in the Student Activities Office A336, during the first 
week of classes according to the foHowing schedule: 

September 10-14 
Monday thru Thursday 8:15 a.m. -9:00 p.m. 

F'riday 8:15 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 

Remainder of Semester 
Monday thru Friday 8:15 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 



(From page 2) 



Faculty leader blasts administration 



Powell sbo attacked the Harper em- 
phasis QD "maaagemeat" sayinc. "1 
know or no other coUene where Ihesepa- 
ratton between teachers and adminis- 
trator is so complete to have created a 
higher education admlnistrative-mana- 
Rer class and a worker class, similar to 
the Industrial model." 

Harper, Powell said, has about SO non- 
teaching administrators, one for every 
three full-time faculty members. "The 
administration ''sn't be rewarded for the 
excellence of student work, ' he said. 
"The teacher deserves that reward. The 
administrator is rather recognized and 
rewarded for his ability to move large 
numbers of students through at the low- 
est possible cost." 

He added, "I have no doubt that Har- 
per will get bigger quicker under tic- 
elusive administrative control. I also 



have 00 doubt that it will waste even 
more money on iil<oncevied programs 
and determined attempts to recruit and 
keep students — any student — who will 
fill up space and bring-you to a second 
campus faster " 

FoUowing a drop In the rate of enroll- 
ment growth last year, Harper officials 
have begun a recruitmeat program to at- 
tract students to Harper. 

Powell said that unless the trend in ad- 
ministration is reversed, "ten years from 
now we will find ourselves the faculty of 
an overblown, dispirited and generally 
bad institution — an extension of the 
common school to the I3lh or 14th year 
and a pom* extettsion at that — a mon- 
strosity built by educational adminis- 
tration waiting to be destroyed as the fu- 
tile teachers colleges and normal schoo'' 
of the 1980's were destroyed after the 
rise of Sputnik. " 



tiM imImU M mi o h't of her 

FALL FASHION 

GIFT CERTIFICATE 



'$1 



Here's your chance 
to save on any oJ 
our great new back 
to school fashions 
for guys and girls 
Just clip this coupon 
and come on in 
l^our gift certificate's 
good on any item 
in the store 



^b^Cs^' 



V 



r$i 



Offer ends Octot)er 

31. 1973 Limit one 

per customer 

Not transferable or 

redeemable in cash 

Valid only at 

the ufheU bit 

MT PROSPECT PLAZA 
Rand and Central Roads 



•^'^m. 



< 



^..t 



Page 4 



THE HARBINGER 



Sept. 10 , 1973 



Sept. 10. 1973 



THE HARBINGER 



STAFF HELP WANTED 

Ihe Harbinger is looking for ihose people who are looking for 
that inside view. We can offer you a well rewarding job on our 
staff. Your benefits can vary upon ypur imagination and ambi- 
tion. We can make available tuition rebates plus travel oppor- 
tunities. H you like to write, we will make you a writer, if you 
like taking pictures, you will be a photographer. All you have 
to do is walk into our Harbinger office A367 or call 397- 
3000. ext. 272. 



cccaxximjTi 



mil 



CCCCCOQUUMN A\\\\\ 



Get to know our traditions 



By DAVE GORDON 

It's that time of the year 
•fill). Time to try and for- 
get your summer playthings 
and get back to the serious 
business at improving your- 
self through the educational 
resources offered by Harper 
College. You may even sur- 
prise yourself and learn 
something 

Many of you are returning 
to Harper as veterans of the 
system For you, the hard- 
est thing to cope with will be 
trying to explain to a few 
"former" friends why you 
weren't able to sUy in touch 
over the summer break 
for those much planned, but 
rarely executed picnics, 
beach parties, etc Those of 
you who have never attended 
Harper before are the peo- 
ple who have the great ad- 
justment to make 

You see. tradition runs 
very high here at Harper, 
and in order for you to 
make the transition with as 
little emotional upset as pos- 
sible we would like to begin 
your education with a sn.all 
explanation of some of our 
traditions 

Occupying the first and 
second floors of "F" build- 
ing you will find the library 
and The Learning Resources 
Center. Down through the 
years, at other less enlight- 
ened institutions, these 
facilities would have been 
used as study areas and 



New classes 

(From page 4) 

Classes will b&>held Monday 
and Wednesday^v through 
October 3. 

The 1:00 p.m to 3:30pm 
class will be held in Room 
A -242 Child care will be 
available at 50 cents an hour. 
The 7:00 p.m to 9:30 p.m. 
class will meet in the board- 
room on the third floor of 
Building A. Tuition is $21 
for district residents, $50 75 
for others Registration is at 
the Office of Continuing Edu- 
cation, A319. 



research centers. Here at 
Harper however, many soc- 
ial minded students have In- 
stituted the tradition of us- 
ing these facilities as a com- 
bination student union and 
gymnasium Of course, there 
are a few serious minded 
students who take offense at 
this, but never fear; we are 
certain that there are enough 
traditionalists to make sure 
of the supremacy of past 
habits 

Harper's food services 
and cafeteria facilities are 
located on the lower level of 
"A " building, with snack bar 
facilities available one flight 
of stairs upward. Traditions 
familiar to these areas are 
really quite cummonplace 
things, so there shouldn't be 
much difficulty in making ad- 
justments to your normal 
habits. Rule number one is 
neverj never clean up your 
own garbage, dirty dishes, et 
al ; they pay somet>ody to do 
that Besides, if the place 
looks like a pig- pen, the 
caVd players andsocializers 
might go over to the library 
and make room for the pay- 
ing customers The second 
deep rooted tradition con- 
cerning the food services 
area is never eat the food 



When lunch time rolls a- 
round. head Xor Mac's 
or some other esublishmeitt 
where well planned, well bal- 
anced menus are available. 
By now I hope that you 
have realized that the last 
few words were written with 
tongue- In -che^ Somewhat 
true they may be. but the 
tongue in -cheek aspect still 
remains The real tradition 
here at Harper is also the 
schools biggest problem 
That problem Is STUDENT 
APATHY: a general lack of 
interest by most students 
in the business, as well as 
social and athletic happen- 
ings of the school 

Fortunately, this is a tra- 
dition that can be easily solv- 
ed. All it Ukes is for you 
the student to get involved- - 
to use a much used cliche- - 
to give a damn. The very 
nature of the academic com- 
munity lends itself to the 
availability of many non- 
academic activities All you 
have to do is CARE 

GET INVOLVED, care a 
bout something other than 
leaving campus as soon as 
your last class is finished 
This campus can only be as 
interesting as its inhabi- 
tants. 



'SRITTING 
XS 
PORBDDCN 







4 



Inconvenient and crippling are the only words to des- 
cribe the situation created by the June 9 Fieldhouse fire. 
In the costly fire which affected an estimated 70% of the 
physical education and intramural programming, a val- 
iant effort is being undertaken by Harper's administra- 
tors, led by Dr. Lahtl, and the Springfield legislators. 

After passing the House and Senate, BUI SB 1199 is 
now in the illustrious hands of Governor Walker, who 
must either, sign it or veto the bill. Governor Walker 
has indicated that he is keeping an open mind about 
the funding of this 'emergency situation'. 

Of the $1.65 million need. Harper is willing to put 
up the $600,000 insurance money they received. It 
seems as if the college is doing all it possibly can to 
make the best of and improve an impossible situation. 
We just hope that Walker will see it the same way. 

Should the bill be signed now, it will still entail a two 
to three year wait before completion of a new sports 
and storage facility is finished. If Walker decides not 
to slRn Bill SB 1199. it will be seven to ten yers be- 
fore Harper will have this much needed facility. 

This type of delay could become a serious threat 
to Harper's programming and its conj^nued growth 
as an outstanding junior college. As of now, three trucks 
are being uUlized as storage and the physical educa- 
tion programs have been severely hampered. 

Governor Walker, we strongly urge you to sign 
BUI SB 1199 for the sake of the future of Harper Col- 
lege and its students. 





Editor-in-chief 
Managing Editor 
Bu<iine«in Manager 
Activities Editor 
Sports Editor 
Photo Editor 



Diane DiBartolnmeo 
Steve Bowman 
Dan Young 
Steve Schnlxner 
Phil Battaglia 
Larry Keil 



Advisor - Mr. Sturdevant 



The HARBI.NGER is the shident publication for the 
Harper College campus community, published weekly 
except during holidays and mid-terms. All opinions 
expressed on the editorial page or in the columns are 
those of Uie writer, and are not necessarUy those of the 
college, its administration, faculty or shident body 

For information on advertising, rates and publica 
tion schedule, call or write Harbinger Business 
Office. 

William Rainey Harper College. Algonquin and 
Roselle Rds . Palatine. Illinois. 60067 Phone num- 
ber 359-4200, ext 272 and 460 



International students 
bridge gap 



Page 5 



New courses offered 



Word about Harper Col- 
lege has reached across the 
world. Fifty -six students 
from 15 countries attended 
Harper College during the 
1973 spring semester under 
the F-1 student visa. The 
figure rose from an en- 
rollment of 13 in 1971 
^^ A similar number of inter- 
national students who are 
visitors, spouses or immi- 
grants also attend the col- 
lege, many on a part-time 
t>asis Under the F-1 visa, 
tiie student must carry a 
minimum of 12 semester 
hours of course work. 

While engineering was 
formerly the traditional ma- 
jor of international students, 
this year interests ranged 
from business management, 
liberal arts, economics, and 
food service to secretarial 
science, nursing and child 
care. 

Many of the young men 
and women have studied ex- 
tensively in their own coun- 
tries, but express the feeling 
that American colleges and 
universities offer the best 
education possible Great 
respect is voiced by them 
for American technology and 
educational facilities 

How do the students hear 
about this community college 
in the midwest of America "» 
Through friends, relatives 
living in America, andagen- 
cies 

Is the language a problem'' 
Suppose you were thrust into 
a classroom in a country 
where a language not native 
to you was written and spo- 
ken - how well would* you 
manage? English is taught 
in schools of many coun- 
tries, and proficiency var- 
ies with the individual Har 
per offers English as a 
Second Language' and a 
special section in an English 
class for international stu- 
dents The Learning Labora - 
tory facilities are also avail- 
able to them. 

Several of the students 
had received information a 
bout Harper College at the 
Chicago YMCA where they 
had taken English classes 

Harper student Joaquin 
Garcia, 23, of Mexico in 
quired about business edu 
cation from the American 
Embassy office He had also 
me^a family from the Chi- 
cago area who knew about 
Harper Garcia intends to 
apply his education in busi- 
ness management and mar 
keting to the operation of a 
family clothing business in 
Mexico. 

Florfina Albano of the 
Philippines was a June grad- 
uate of the associate degree 
nursing progr im. and is now 
employed at Resurrection 
Hospital in Chicago. Miss 
Albano. 31, first came to this 
country as a high school stu- 
dent under the American 
Field Service program She 
had been a senior at the 
• University of Illinois, but 



left the school for various 
reasons While in Hoffman 
Estates, helping her sister 
with a family of five chil- 
dren, she enrolled at Har- 
per 

Sahavejjabhand. 19. stat- 
ed, i came here to get a 
better education than I would 
be able to obtain in my 
country. We have four or 
five universities there and 
there is room for only the 
very best students" 

Marcelo Rodriguez. 26. 
had completed five years of 
study at a university in his 
home country of Bolivia when 
he enrolled at Harper in the 
Medical Technician pro 
gram Already familiar with 
the course content, his main 
purpose was to improve his 
English 

I am lucky." said Rod 
riguez. who lives with a 
brother in Arlington Heights, 
"because I have many 
friends in the area. But it 
is hard for most interna- 
tional students to become 
acquainted It seems that 
everyone has his own circle 
of friends, and it is hard for 
others to get inside " 

Simeon Ugwu of Nigeria 
became well acquainted with 
Harper students and offic- 
ials through his role as Stu- 
dent Senate president He 
will be transferring to 
Northwestern Univers i t y 
this fall to continue political 
science studies Having ex- 
perienced the Nigerian Civil 
War. twenty -two year old 
Ugwu intends to return to 
Nigeria and become active 
In his couhtry's politics 

Ugwu's conuct with Har- 
per began when he became 
acquainted with a minister 
from Arlington Height.s who 
was touring Nigeria 

"Language was no prob- 
lem for me." Ugwu said 
"I had to pass English and 
pass it well before I was 
allowed to come to America 
as a student In some coun- 
tries they are notsostrict 

English is the number two 
problem for international 
students, according to Victor 
Cabera of Mexico Cabera 
is president of Harper s In 
ternational Student Associa- 
tion which was organized 
last faU "Communication is 
the number tme prob- 
lem.' said Cabrera, "com- 
munication with other stu- 
dents and with the commu- 
nity " 

In an effort to encourage 
such communication, Cab- 
rera said that a soccer team 
plan was suggested to the 
association 

He explained. "Most in 
ternational students are 
fami'iar with soccer We 
hoped to form a team, then 
when we became well prac- 
ticed, we could spread out 
into the community, play 
other teams and teach others 
the game By this means, 
we could all become better 
acquainted." 



By MARY BETH CHRISTY 

HEY! Did you know Har- 
per is offering some new 
courses this year? That s 
right! If you aren't satis- 
fied with Harpers wide var- 
iety of courses now. mlybe 
you'll find one that you fancy 
below - - 

WOMEN WRITERS THEIR 
LIVES AND THEIR ART 

Creative women will be 
helped to understand the 
challenges facing modern 
women - coping with frus- 
tration and achieving self 
fulfillment The class is held 
Thursday evenings. Sept 13 
to Nov 1 from 7-lu pm 
Tuitibn is $21 00 for in-dis- 
trict residents Out -of -dis- 
trict residents pay $50 75 



PIPE DRAFTING 

This course is intended for 
persons with oneyearof higi 
school drafting orequivalem 
background, to further theii 
knowledge about the procesi 
of pipe drafting Classes art 
held atElkGroveH S .Tues 
day and Thursday in roon- 
195 beginning Sept 11 Hours 
are from 6 30 p m to 9 20 
p m The fee is $42 00 for 
in -district residents and 
$104 29 for others 



BANKING. FINANCE. AND 
CREDIT PROCRAM 

This two-year program, 
usually taught at the Chi 
cago Chapter of the Ameri- 
can Institute of Banking 
(AIB). is now being offered 
at Harper to those already 
working in the credential 
oriented business world and 
who do not especially want 
to travel to Chicago or re- 
main downtown for special- 
ized training Extra infor- 
mation can be obtained from 
ext .156 or 311. Division of 
Business 

DIETETIC TECHNICIAN 
PROGRAM 

This program, first of its 
kind to be offered in Illi 
nois. is now available at 
Harper The curriculum is 
designed to prepare men and 
women for nutritional care 
middle management posi- 
tions in the area of medi- 
cal dietetics. 

Inquiries about this pro 
gram contact Mrs Hen- 
rietle Gebert of Life and 
Health Sciences. 

If you still haven't found a 
course to your liking, there's 
more. 

SCUBA DIVING 

Men and women interested 
in scuba diving, but never 
had equipment or the time, 
can now learn about safe 
diving, weightles.sness. and 
up-to-date diving principle.s 
in the foreign world. Fee for 
all is $48 00 plus SI 2 00 for 
equipment use Classes held 
Monday nights, from 7 .'^0 to 
10 30 atSt Viator HS Start 
ing Sept 10 through Jan 9. 
Registration - 9 AM to ft 
PM in A2I3. 



FOOD PURCHASING 
FOOD SERVICE 
SUPERVISION 

For people interested in 
the extras' of food service 
management, a three credit 
course is offered Tuesday 
evenings, 6:25 to 9:05. start- 
ing Sept 11. 

FOOD SUPERVISION 

Food Supervision, a four 
credit course offered Wed- 
nesday nights, starts Sept 
12 from 6 25 to 9 50 Con- 
tact the office of Continuing 
Education Ext 301 

TEACHER AIDE 

In cooperation with Pala- 
tine School District 15 and 
WheeUng School District 21. 
Harper will offer this 30 
credit hours program to 



those who haven't had time 
to acquire four years of col- 
lege credit To enroll, con- 
tact Paul Jung, director of 
personnel of Palatine School 
District 15 or MarjorieBea. 
assistant superintendent of 
instruction of Wheeling 
School District 21. 

GROUP COMMUNICATION 
METHODS 

' A Continuing Education 
non - credit course in 
Methods of Group Communi- 
cation designed to assist in- 
dividuals in basic theoretical 
and practical skills in group 
dynamics and process, will 
be presented both afternoon 
and evening at Harper Col- 
lege beginning September 10. 



(Turn to page 4) 



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SPACK AGK .MATKRIAI^S Life 
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Page 6 



THE HARBINGER 



Sept. 10. 1973 



A ffolrsfic insight on todays sotiety 



By DIANE DIBARTOLOMEO 

There are few plays which 
can be said to completely 
satisfy »he humor of its en- 
tire audience, especially so 
if inhabited by a melting pot 
of various ages and in par- 
ticular a ladder at social 
classes- -Status quo Vadis 
is one d these select few. 
"Status" is not just a 
social satire shining light 
on a realistic but "hard to 
believe existent " society of 
today. It is a unique exper- 
ience which catches both its 
performers and audience in 
a "bind" of sell - realization 
The satire directed solely 
toward* the audience , result 
ed in deep thought and con- 
centration and later to be 
taken with a "grain of salt." 

During intermission in the 
lobby the reactions ontlie 
part of the audience was 
confirmed with voices of ap- 
praisal ; "The comedy is 
fresh, open and honest." 
shouted an elderly lady to 
her escort above the roars 
and laughter of the people 
gathering in the lobby. A 
young girl in her teens re- 
marked "You know dad I'm 
really glad I came, this play 
is up-to-date, yeah like real- 
ly up-to-date!" "And witty 
too" her father replied. 

As in most plays the sue - 
cess lay in the hands of the 
outstanding performances of 
the actors: -the abilitv to 



reach out and communicate 
to their audience, to create 
a persuading role, in short, 
make the script come alive- - 
as accomplished in Status. 
If you can stand the satire 
and sarcasim see Status quo 
Vadis. 

I would like to close with 
a noteworthy event I encoun- 
tered the opening night of 
the play While in the ladies 
room at The Ivanhoe an el- 
derly well dressed, high 
society type lady approach- 



ed a pregnant young woman, 
about twenty-five (who is the 
wife of one of the perform- 
ers, probably a struggling 
actor), the elder lady said, 
"Don't believe what anyone 
else tells you, Neil is ter- 
rific and is doing just fine." 
A rather somewhat authora- 
tive jesture? As the elderly 
lady left she deposited her 
quarter in the small china 
dish "Thank yah shouted out 
the small meek negro at- 
tendant." 




THE STORY OF BIG JOHN WINTERGREEN 
A 5'r MOTORCYCLE COP IN A 6'2" WORLD 




CALENDAR Or»EVENTS 

On Campus • 

Expanding Horizons - "Women and Their Art", 

1:00 A242 $3. 
GRASS ROOTS Concert, 8:00 Lounge bldg A, Sept. 

14, $2. 
Student Senate Mtg. 12:30 A242-A Sept. 13. 
"The French Connection" starring academy award 

winner Geae Hackman. 8:00 E106 Wept. 21 50 . 

Theatre - 

Pre-Broadway Opening - Studebacker - Sept. 26 
"Children of the Wind," a gifted actor whose suc- 
cess in the theatre terrifies and ultimately destroys 
him. ph. ST2-2280. 

"Crease" originally produced in Chicago this baekr 
ward musical glance at the SO's returns after a suc- 
cessful B'way run. Blackstone The. Ph. ST2-2280. 
"The Marriage-Go- Round" sophisticated comedy 
starrglng Dana Andrews, Pheasant Run SepL 11- 
Oct 21. Ph. 584-1454. / 

"Status Quo Vadis" another B'way fefugee. Thft 
satirical comedy returns to the Ivanhoe for another 
of what will most likely be a pfienomenal run. 
Thru Oct. 7 PH. 248-6800. 
,^" Prisoner of 2nd Avenue" Neil Simon comedy star- 
ring Sid Caesar and lmogen<^ Coca. Arlington Park 
The. thru SepL 16 Ph. 392-6800. 
"The Dairy of Adam and Eve" Mark Twain's 
satire on life in Eden, Elrohurst College Sept. 26 
8:00-free Ph. 279-4100. 

"Tamu-Tamu" world premiere of Menottis' new 
chamber opera realted to the theme of one species; 
many culhires Studebaker Sept. 16 8:00 Sept. 12 
it 16 2:00 p.m. Ph. 922-2973. 

Musk- 

Sha-Na-Na SepL 14 8:00 $5 North NapervUle 

355-5500 ext. 74 Central College 

David Bowie SepL 21-22 Auditorium The. Ph. 922- 

2110 

Uriah Heep Sept 26 Amphitheatre. Ph. 927-5580 

King Crimson SepL 29 at 8:00 Auditorium The. 

Special Films - 

Single ShoWsings: 

Orson Welles "Macbeth" Art Institute of Chicago. 
FuUerlon HaU Ph. 236-2523 $1 SepL 14 5:30 
& 7:30. 
' "Gone With The Wind" 2-part presentation of 
original version SepL 23 & 24 7:30-11:30 North- 
western U.. Tech. Int., Evanston Ph. 864-0752 

$1 

1 

Scries Showings - 

Fred Astaire & Ginger Rogers Festival — 
Beginning Sept. 18 Tues. at 8:00 Fred and Ginger 
tap their way into your hearts for $1.50. Museum 
of Contemporary Art Ph. 943-7756. 



Board schedules events 






A JA*€S WIUAM GUEROO-fM'EmHrrZIGProduaion 
•EUECTRA aOE IN BLUE' sttrrng ROBERT BLAKE 
atLY (GREEN> BUSH ProOuomi and Owcwd by JAMES WLLIAM GUERCIQ Scfwnp>ay by_ro 6£RT BORIS 
Story by ROBERT B0R6ir«J RUPERT H!TZl(>-M«««Compowd by JAMES VVlllAMGUERCO jj^MMIli 



porss»yi»l 



MIDWEST PREMIERE— NOW PLAYING 

|UL/1 -bTrt -4 L^J AJwM CONTINUOUS «RFC«MANCES FROM 2 ^ M 

IWH^Jm^^JkMn me fcoOM t«t o» mim u i wi POPULAR 



By DIANE DiBARTOLOMEO 

Student Senate Program 
Board President Pam Ver- 
chetto has super heavy 
events scheduled for this 
year Concerts and mlni- 
courses are just part of the 
dont miss activities 

Four major concerts are 
booked with such famous art- 
ists as' The Grass Roots 
and Earl Scruggs. For after- 
noon activities comedians 
^re booked in the lounge - 
free admittance! See films 
such as "The French Con- 
nection" and "Mash" for 
*only 50 cents. Every Tues- 
day a haven atmosprfiere is 
created for those who wish 
to get away from it all and 
relax to the melodies of folk 
singers, in the coffeehouse 



located in the third cubicle 
of the cafeteria. 

A flea market is planned 
in May and mini courses 
such as belly dancing tech- 
niques are offered free all 
year long! 

No klip joint activities 
here. The Program Board 
is a non-profit organization 
created just for you, the 
student. These special 
events are just too goo<] to 
miss out on. 

Getting involved, added 
with work and mixed in with 
dedication, may just be the 
right ingredient to get these 
big plans cookin'. But if 
phrases such as getting in- 
volved, time, work and dedi- 
cation turn you off - - better 
forget it, cuz nothin ain't 
gonna turn you on. 



Sept. 10 , 1973 

"The Naked Ape^^ 

A primitive biology lesson 



THE HARBINGER 



Page 7 



By LORRIE BETZOLD 

The Naked Ape, produced 
by Hugh Hefner and directed 
by Donald Driver makes a 
great short movie for the 
high-schoolers. Its message, 
(we learned back in Krosh 
Bio. class, only with a little 
Hegerism spice added) is 
man is still the hunter, whose 
primitive instincts cause him 
to cap up his natural urges 
and needs. 

The stars, Johnny Craw- 
ford, Victoria Principal, and 
Dennis Olivieri lost the pic- 
ture to the animated cave- 
men. The better highlight of 
the movie was a letter to the 
president of the ILS. by a 
soldier played by Olivieri. 
It read: 

"Dear President. 

Twenty-five million years 
ago, when I was swinging 
in the jungle, it shrank. I had 
to come down out ofthetrees 
and adapt to the open 
ground, where, after consid- 
erable sacrifice and hard- 
ship, I evolved into man. I 
know there was a slip-up 
somewhere and you were not 
informed ofthis. because you 
have me back in the jungle. 
I hereby submit that you 



have designed a war for 
apes and as a member of 
mankind, I am exempt and 
hereby tender my resigna- 
tion. Hoping that your ad- 
ministration can find bigger 
and better monkies to fight 
its wars, I remain . . . 

Arnie I)icker«on P. F. C. " 
The Nakes Ape ends back 
in the jungle war setting. Ar- 
nie finds that his letter of 
resignation to the President 
won't go any good. ,He is 
sitting by the body of his 
friend Lee-now a casualty of 
a war neither of them un- 
derstood, and is being watch- 
ed by an audience just as 
bewildered .... 




The Grass 



Grassropts cippeciring at Harp#r 



de Grass Roots, a musi- 
cal group which has produc- 
ed several million-selling 
records, will present a con- 
cert at Harper College Sep- 
tember 14 The program will 
begin at 8 pjn in the Col- 
lege Center. Public admis- 
sion is $3 at the door, or 
$2.50 in advance Admission 
for Harper students, faculty 
and staff is $2 50 at the 
door or $2 in advance Tic- 
kets are available at the 
Student Activities Office 

The five musicians of The 
Grass Roots have been a 
unit since 1966, when their 
first single was Where 
were You When 1 Needed 
You." Their million- sellers 
include 'Midnight Confes- 
sions." "Sooner or Later " 
and "Two Divided by Love "" 

While recording. The 
Grass Roots take advantage 
of overdubbing techniques to 
add on instruments, or to 
' create elaborate harmonies, 
sometimes utilizing just one 
voice. 

Their concerts include in 
strumentals and improvisa- 
tion The group may restruc- 
ture a set in the middle of a 
performance to match the 
mood of the audience 

Musician Warren explains. 
'The most important thing 
to us during a live perfor- 
mance is to stay aware of 
the audience and what they're 
up to " " 




Fate of fieldhouse undecided 



(From page 1 ) 

have junior colleges in their 
districts. In other words, they 
recognized Harper's emer- 
gency need and indicated 
their support for State ac- 
Uon. 

I)r, Lahti also stated what 
effects the fire had caused 
"The instructional courses 
that were offered in the 14,- 
500 squarefeet of area space 
of the previous physical ed- 
ucation building must now 
be completely eliminated 
from the physical education 
•progress. Specific courses 
to be eliminated are basket- 
ball, badminton, volleyball, 



fencing, gymnastics, paddle- 
ball and'wrestling." 

The effect of this tragedy 
on the physical education 
program, the adult and con- 
tinuing education physical 
fitness program, the intra- 
mural program, the club 
sport and student activity 
programs and the intercol- 
legiate athletic program 
has been devastating. With- 
out the facility, seventy per- 
cent of the physical educa- 
tion and intramural pro- 
grams cannot be carried 
out. A majority of the 1500- 
2000 students and commun- 
ity members who have used 




This is what remains of the fieldhouse after the fire 
which destroyed it. 



the facility each semester in 
organized credit prof^ams 
will not be able to partici 
pale in a supervised pro- 
gram or activity. Also af- 
fected are the 500-700 stu- 
dents who participated in 
intramurals, club sports and 
physical fitness on a week- 
ly basis. In addition to on- 
campus programs affected, 
many community groups 
vkho wen? able to utilize the 
facility have also been cur- 
tailed. * 

It is apparent that time 
will elapse until a new facil- 
ity is constructed and this is 
crucial. Only a short period 
of time can exist before there 
is a serious toll taken on the 
progress that ha.s been made 
in program de'velopment. To 
avQJi# serious cutbacks in 
programs and staff, it is of 
the utmost importance that 
a new facility be construct- 
ed as quickly as possible. 

We know that the fire that 
occurred on June 9, 1972 
was a great loss t% Harper 
College not only in the ed- 
ucational field that was lost 
but also in the money and 
equipment that was lost. We, 
the student body, salute Dr. 
Lahti in his efforts to help 
the educational standards of 
our college. 



The Graaaroota 




Win , 

this Honda 

3 Rrst Prizes: HONDA Super Sports 

50 Second Prizes: 

Columbia 10-speed Mkes 

Guess the number of staples 
in the jar. 




NM Mie • Ml« 



The jar is approximately BV*" 
high and 10" in circumference. 
It's filled with Swinglme Tot 
staples. (Look for the clue 
about Tot capacity in the 
coupon ) 

The Tot 50* stapler is un- 
conditionally guaranteed It 
staples, tacks, mends Only 
98c* with 1,000 staples at your 
stationery, variety or college 
t>ookstore 

Cub* Desk and Hand 
staplers are only $1.98*. 
And the Super Cub" sta- 
pler with no-slip, 



no-scratch base, only $2 67* 

Fill in coupon or send post 
card No purchase required 
Entries must t>e postmarked by 
Nov 30, 1973 and received by 
Dec 8, 1973. Final decision by 
an independent judging organ- 
ization Prizes awarded to en- 
tries r>earest actual count In 
case of tie. a drawing deter- 
mines winners Offer subject 
to all federal, state and local 
laws Void in Fla and Wash 
and wherever prohibited 
or restricted. 

5u(j(jMl»<l R«Uil Pricc 




3.' 00 Sli.nmjn fvp LIC NV ItlQl 



J 



^ fc 



J 



Page 8 



THE HARBINGER 



Sept. 10. 1973 



Football players shine in scrimmage 



By PHIL BATTAGLIA 

Saturday, September 1, 
was a bright and sunny 
day and certainly before the 
day had ended things had 
brightened for Harper Col- 
lege football Coach John 
EUasik. That Saturday was 
the day that Wright College 



he was also able to get a 
good look at four transfer 
students, which will add to 
his team. 

Eliasik stated "With our 
fieldhouse burned down, 
things are a little rough but 
it's not holding our team 
back at all. They're all do- 
ing their job and working 




Head Football Coach John Ettaaik 



came to Harper for a 90 
minute controlled scrim- 
mage to test both offen- 
sive and defenaive units 
from both colleges. 

Harper showed well in 
the scrimmage, especially in 
their aggressive piay around 
the linebacker spots. Deep 
coverage will need addition- 
al work, but all in all the 
boyt from Harper were 
very impressive. 

Coach Eliasik and his 
staff should be congratulat- 
ed as several times during the 
scrimmage certain areas 
broke down for Harper. 
But each time either unit 
came to the sidelines, the 
coaching staff would make 
adjustments. 

The adjustments made by 
the staff were very evident 
as the units would return 
to action and what had been 
a weak spot, would become 
a solid part of the Harper 
team. Coach Eliasik did get 
a chance to test his eleven 
returning veterans in ac- 
tual game conditions and 



at It bard". 

Eliasik originally from 
Southern Illinois has been 
the coach at Harper for the 
past three years. During his 
career he was All-Confer- 
ence two times. He played 
on the offensive and was the 
team Captain in 1966. 

"We have a fine addition 
to our staff this year," stat- 
ed Eliasik. "We were able 
to acquire Coach Ed Pug- 
Uese, a former head coacn 
at NUes East High SchooL 
Ed brings a tremendous win- 
ning spirit and reputation 
from Niles East and he is a 
welcome addition to my 
staff." 

A welcome addidon Pug- 
liese will be as there is no 
question Harper has been 
short on coaching members 
the past few years. Noinatter 
how you cut itorwhatmeth- 
ods you try, all the organiza- 
tion cannot replace the ad- 
vantage an additional coach 
gives to a team in individ- 
ual attention. 

The eleven returning let- 




termen that worked in the 
scrimmage are: Steve O'- 
Neil; Mike Brahaney; Steve 
Kolech; Steve Galader and 
Kim Planert. 

Also returning were Carl 
Nightingale; John Herter; 
Kim Menken; Mayo Wil- 
liams; MikeMuti and Wayne 
Huniott. Getting a good look 
from the coaching staff were 
four transfer students, Pat 
l>empsey; Bruce Kay; Dave 
Wajnikch and Jim Leo- 
pardo. 

One thing is certain, and 
that is the Harper team is 
well conditioned and even 
at the end of the scrim- 
mage both units appeared 
willing to continue. 

Cifssti waihikk 
hr $€9b& frt«b 

By PHIL BATTAGLIA 

Students will hear 

"Everybody Into their wet 
suits* at"^-. Scuba Diving 
Course offered this fall for 
the first time by Harper Col- 
lege Continuing Education 
Complete sets of equipment 
including wet suits will be 
used by students of the 
course 

"Students will learn safe 
diving, " says Instructor Dick 
Jacaby They will find out 
about weightlessness and 
about a foreign world They 
will be exposed to up-to- 
date sports diving prin- 
ciples Jacaby said students 
should be able to swim but 
need not be racers 

Scuba Diving will be held 
Monday nights from Septem - 
ber 10, through January 9. 
from 7 30pm to I0:30p m 
at St Viator High School In 
Arlington Heights Fee for 
all students is $48 plus $12 
for equipment use Registra- 
tion may be made at Harper 
College in Room A 213 
from 9:00 am to 9:00 p m . 
Monday through Thursday 
and from 9 00 am to noon 
Saturday The Office of Con- 
tinuing Education telephone 
number is 397-3000. exten 
sion 301 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 



September 15 
September 22 
September 29 
October 6 
October 13 
October 20 
October 27 
November 3 
November 10 



DuPage (A) 
Kennedy King (H) 
Iowa Central (A) 
Rock VaUey (A) 
Concordia (A) 
lUinols VaUey (A) 
Oakland (H) 

Triton (H) 

Joliet (H) 



7:30 p.m. 
1:30 p.m. 
1:30 p.m. 
1:30 p.m. 
2:00 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 
7:30 p.m. 
1:30 p.m. 
1:30 p.m. 



CROSS COUNTRY SCHEOULB 



Wed.. Sept. 

Toes., Oct. 2 
Sat., Oct. 6 

Wed.. Oct. 10 

Sat. Oct. 13 

Wed., Oct. 17 

Sat, Oct 20 
-Sat. Oct. 27 
Fri;, Nov. 2 
Sat, Nov. 10 



Lake County - 

Mc Henry 

May fair- Triton • 

Blackhawk 

Invitational 

Oakton- Keiinedy- 

Klng 

Milwakee 

Invitational 

Elgin-DuPage - 

Waubonsee 

DuPage Invitational 

Region IV 

Skyway Conference 

NJCAA 



Lake County 4 pm 

Harper 4 pm 

Moline 1 1 am 

Niles West HS 4 pm 

Milwaukee 1 pm 

Harper 4 pm 

Glen EUyn 11 am 

Harper 1 1 am 

Triton 3 pm 

Florida 11 am 



Head Coach: Robert Nolan 



Mon.. Sept 17 
Thurs.. Sept 20 

Mon.. Sept 24 

Wed.. Sept. 26 

Thurs., Sept 27 

Mon., Oct^ 1 

Tues.. Oct. 2 
Mon.. Oct 8 

Thurs., Oct. 1 1 

Tues., Oct. 16 

Fri.. Oct. 19 

Fri., Oct. 26 
Sat., Oct. 27 



GOLF SCHEDULE 

Elgin 

Lake County & 

McHenry 

Danville Invitation'*! 

Mayfair & Triton 

Joliet Invitational 

College of DuPage 

Oakton 

Lake County 

Invitational 

Elgin & Waubonsw 

Sectional Tournament 

Skyway Conference 

Meet 

Region IV Tournament 



Away 1:30 pm 
Away 1:30 pm 

Away 

Home 1:30 pm 
(Palatine Hills) 
Away 

Away 1:00 pm 
(Village Links) 
Away 1:30 pm 
(Rob Roy) 
Away 

Home 1:30 pm 
(Palatine HiUs) 



Champaign 



June 1 1-16 NJCAA Tournament 



Head Coach: Roger Bechtold 



Before you buy 



Auto Insurance 
C-' 495-0648 

• 20% Savings for faculty 

* Driver training credit 

* Good student discount 

* Financial Responsibility 

* Motorcycles all CC's 



Football team In action 



\ 



I Brodley/Bradley Agency Insurance Inc. 



Classified ads 
available to 
Harper 
.students 
•FREE" 



L 



1 




J 



; * 




Construction causes Harper headaches 



By RONALD POREP 

Students are goinj? to have 
traveling headaches on 
Algonquin and Roselle Roads 
until the end of this year 
according to the Illinois De 
partment of Transportation 
and the contractors doing 
the work. 

Al Sifrer of the Illinois 
Department of Transporta- 
tion says the south two lanes 
of Algonquin Road have al- 
ready been graded and the 
grading on the north two 
lanes should be completed 



soon. "We hope to complete 
all paving on Algonquin Road 
by the end of November of 
this year. This means weath • 
er permitting, of course, 
stated Sifrer. DOT project 
group leader 

Other roads hotvever will 
be offering travel troubles 
to students and other travel- 
ers in the college area 
throughout the entire year at 
different times 

Fine grading of Golf Road 
between Meachum and 
Roselle Roads has started 




Travel trouble* will be abundant in the college area 
throughout the entire year. (Photo by I.. R. Kid) 



with traffic expected to be 
bottle necked there until the 
end of November at least. 

Those traveling through 
Hoffman Estates will find a 
five- mile resurfacing proj - 
ect underway on streets in 
the Highlands and EkxleRoad 
sections. 

Travelers in Schaumburg 
will experience a fewdaysof 
delay by the end of the month 
at two of the busiest inter- 
sections in that community 
Stoplight installation is ex- 
pected to start at theinier- 
sections of Roselle and 
Schaumburg Roads and Ro- 
selle and Wise Roads. 

Taxpayers in the commu 
nities involved can be of 
decent cheer though as the 
villages are not footing all 
the costs of the road work 
For the stoplight installa 
tions, only 21'f of the cost 
will t>e paid for by SchaiAn 
burg Motor Fuel Tax money 
from village coffers The 
rest of the cost will be shar- 
ed by the county, state and 
the Federal government All 
of the road work is being 
partially financed by the 
Traffic Operations Program 
to Increase Capacity and 



Safety (TOPICS). 

Village and college police 
will be directing traffic 
through the entire mess, but 



Smdent Senate seeks involvement 



I 



By STEVE BOWMAN 

The Student Senate is going 
all out to involve you' The 
upcoming Student Senate 
elections will be much dif- 
ferent than in previous 
years What do you have to 
do to vote. All you do is 
make an X for the candi- 
date of your choice and sign 
your name and mail it back 
And you oan do this in the 
comfort and privacy of your 
own home Simple, huh' 
"This is an experiment." 
said Bob Hayhurst. SSHC 
president. "Wed like to get 
as many p.eople as possible 
to vote We want more p»-(iplr 
to vote Last election we had 
only 150 people voting -- 
and that was a major elec- 
tion ' 

Also this plan will not 
cost the voter anything. 
There will be a post paid 
envelope with each ballot. 
What could be easier! Ac- 
cording to Hayhurst, the bal- 
lots will be mailed just as 
soon after all of the petitions 
are returned. You may ask 
who is a voter, any one who 
is a registered Harper stu- 
dent is also a voter. . 

Now that the Student Senate 
has gone to all of this time, 
trouble, and expense to pro- 



mote a lair, honest. «ind 
easy way for students to 
vote, it rx)w is up to you' 
You could just forget about 
it. of course. \(iu could then 
just about forgt>t student ac- 
tivities as well Hayhurst 
has encouraged students to 
vote because as has bt-en 
stated all of the students 
In activities would suffer 

It is hoped that all of this 
does not fall on deaf ears 
As of this writing the peti 
tions will all be in and those 



running known The rest* is 
up to you! I hope that you 
are up to the task Because 
if you arenH. who else is 

To quote Bob Mayhurst s 
opening remarks in the Stu- 
dent Handbook ". A diver 
sity of Students and organi 
zations abound at Harper 
Any student can. if he wish- 
es, join a number of different 
clubs and participate in any 
activities on our campus " 

(Twn to pace 2) 




students are advised to start 
for college classes from 
home as early as possible to 
ensure arriving on time. 




Comtniction is predicted to be completed by November 
of '73. (Photo hy Jim Moy) 



Significant gains 
in Harper enrollments 



student Senate President. Bob Hayhurst listens intentlve- 
ly. as Dr. Lahll gives suggestions for more student par- 
ticipation. (Photo by Greg Conway) 



By RON ZOBERIS 

Harper Colleges' fall en- 
rollment figures indicate 
that the 1973-74 year will 
be a "catch -up year." says 
Dr Guerin A Fischer, vice 
president of student affairs 

On the first day of Harper 
classes on .,Monday (Sept 
10). there were 8.725 full 
and part-time credit stu- 
dents enrolled, representing 
an increase of l&l over last 
falls first day fibres. Ad- 
ditionally there were 4.530 
students registered for con- 
tinuing education programs, 
an increase of 32^J over last 
year This continuing educa- 
tion figure includes enroll- 
ments in non- credit continu- 
ing education, university ex ■ 
tension, women's seminars, 
business seminars, and adult 
basic education "The con- 
tinuing education figures in- 
dicate the college s interest 
in extending its community 
service role on an ever -in- 
creasing basis. Dr Fis- 
cher said 

The total headcount en- 
rollment of 13.255 this fall 
is a 15 6'J increase over 
last years 11 ,185 students 
The full - time equivalent 
(FTE) credit figure of 5.402 
students, including all day 
and evening students, shows 
an il'^i increase over the 
4,825 FTE figure for the fall 
of 1972 When comparing the 
daytime FTE for both years. 



the increase from 3,928 in 
1972 to 4,322 on the first 
day In 1973 amounts to a 
\(yi Increase 

Dr Fischer pointed out 
that despite the ever-grow- 
ing numbers of students on 
campus, they are spread 
over a 15-hour instructional 
day, including Friday nights 
and on Saturday mornings 
Thus classes remain a man- 
ageable size that helps in- 
sure personal attention be- 
tween teacher and student*- 

Dr Fischer indicated that 
Harper is striving to offer 
its residents a comprehen- 
sive program of educational 
services, and that it is the 
community college which in 
succeeding years will bring 
greater educational oppor- 
tunities to citizens 

Higher education will 
surely look ahead totheyear 
1984 with the growing par- 
ticipation of the community 
junior colleges Over half of 
all entering students now 
enter junior collages This 
number will continuopsly 
grow mainly because junior 
colleges are close to l^ome 
and have an open door policy 
of letting most all students 
enter With the additional 
growth of financial aid pro- 
grams and Federal grants, 
tomorrow's student will not 
end his or her education af- 
ter hjgh school, but continue 
on to the nearest low - cost 
junior college. 



t 



y 



. I 



Page 2 



THE HARBINGER 



Sept. 24, 1973 



Harper field house a victim of red tape 




No funds as of yet have been provided toward the recon- 
struction of the Harper field house. (Photo by L. R. Kid) 
\ 




Win 
this Honda 



3 First Prizes: HONDA Super Sports 

50 Second Prizes: 

Columbia 10-speed bikes 

Guess the number of staples 
in the jar. 




MwMWtMW 



The jar is approximately 8V4" 
high aiHl 10" in circumference. 
It's fillad with Swinghne Tot 
slaplaa. (Look (or the clue 
about Tot capacity in the 
coupon ) 

The Tot 50* stapler is un- 
conditionally guaranteed It 
staples, tacks, mends. Only 
98<* with 1,000 staples at your 
stationery, variety or college 
t>ookstore 

Cub* Desk and Hand 
staplers are only $1 98* 
And the Super Cub" sta- 
pler with no-slip, 

|cLUC: 

(You could fill b«twe«n 700 
and 300 Tots with IfM tu- 
ple* in the jar ) 



no-scratch base, only $2.67* 

Fill in coupon or send post 
card. No purchase required. 
Entries must be postmarked by 
Nov 30. 1973 and received by 
Dec 8. 1973 Final decision by 
an independent judging organ- 
ization Prizes awarded to en- 
tries nearest actual count In 
case of tie. a drawirtg deter- 
mines winners Offer subject 
to all federal, state and local 
laws Void in Fla and Wash 
and wherever prohibited 
or restricted. 

"luoo^ilKI B»l«il Ptirr 
riMOlINC HONDA f I 



Staples in 




Ot» erf S*">glin« Inc 

3? 00 Skillman *>« I I C N Y It 101 



■L ^^ ^^ T,^^^2Li,rV ^^ 3? 00 Sliillman «»> I I C N Y t 



By RON ZOBERIS 

Senate Bill 1199wasplac- 
ed before Gov. Dan Walker !s 
desic for legislativeapproval 
and was vetoed TTiis bill 
would ha ve provided! 1.650,- 
000 toward the construction 
of a $2.2 million physical 
education and classroom 
building These funds would 
have provided for the re- 
construction of the Harper 
Field House which burned 
down Jioie 9, 1973 Since 
these funds are not consid- 
ered an emergency appro- 
priation, they conveniently 
label them a " 'low priority " 

The main reason for Walk - 
er's "Veto" was that he felt 
that this request should have 
been accompanied with an 
approval by the Junior Col - 
lege Board. 

There will be a special 
supplement in the next issue 
of the Harbinger concerning 
additional detailed informa- 
tion on the progress of the 
reconstruction of the Fiela 
House. 



CALENDAR OF EVENTS 



On Campus- - 

ST. LOUIS JAZZ QUARTET Concert. 8:00 College 
Center Lounge. Sept 27 Everything from blues 
and ballads to spirituals and jazz. Free with 
Harper ID. Public: adults, $1 50, students. 75c 

WILDFLOWER Concert Dance, 8:00 College Center 
Lounge, Sept 28 $1 with ID. Tickets available 
at Student Activities Office. 

HARPER PLAYERS, every Tues and Thurs , 12:30. 
F-342. 

Theatre- • 
" Brief Lives." a play for one player, starring Roy 
Dotrice as John Aubrey. Arlington Park Theatre. 
Opens Sept 25 Ph 3«J2 6800 

"Grease." originally produced in Chicago, this 
backward musical glance at the 50 s returns after 
a successful B'way run. Blackstone Theatre. Ph. 
ST 2 -2280 

"Children of the Wind," a gifted actor whose suc- 
cess in the theatre terrifies and ultimately destroys 
' him Ph ST 2-2280. Studebaker Theatre 

"Status Quo Vadis." another B'way refugee. This 
satirical comedy returns to the Ivanhoe for an- 
other of what will most likely be a phenomenal 
run Thru Oct. 7. Ph 248-6800^>^ ' 
"The Marriage -Go- Round, "/fcphisticated comedy 
starring Dana Andrews. Pheasant Run, Sept. 11- 
Oct. 21 Ph 584-1454. 

Music- • 

Uriah Keep. Sept. 26. Amphitheatre. Ph 927-5580 
King Crimson. Sept. 29 at 8:00. Auditorium Theatre 

Lectures- - 

"An Evening with Norman Mailer." covering his 
works, the new Journalism and other topics Rosary 
College. Oct 3. 8:00. Tickets. $3 50 
"Quit Smoking Clinic." Triton College Registra- 
tion in progress and will be accepted during first 
session of clinic Sessions surt Sept. 24. 7:30-9:00 
p m Maple Room of College Center building Regis- 
tration fee: $5 Contact Mr Rohling 456-0300. 
ext. 297 

Series Showing- • 

Chicago Historical Society's September Feature - of - 
the- Month exhibit highlights John Jones, an influ- 
ential blacl( leader, of the 1800's Mon -Sat . 9 30- 
4:30 and Sun . 12 30-5.30. Admission, students with 
ID -^J5c 



Student senate 



(From pace t) 



FACULTY QUOTES 
ON CAMPUS 

"I hate to use these 
big damned lectures. I'd 
like to use them as a 
class The problem is 
when you've got a class 
this size it's hard to get 
to studeitts " 

- Kimmet 



'The Student Senate at 
Harper College is a viable 
force and was established 
to serve the student iMxly 
of which you are now a 
member If any problem 
arises, please do not hesi- 
tate to stop in toi Ulk with 
me or else attend any of 
the Senate meetings We will 
be glad to listen and to help 



you; that is one of our pur- 
poses " This cannot 
happen without your support 
Your vote is needed to make 
this work. For without your 
support we cannot exist to 
support you! 

IMPORTANT 
The deadline for Student 
Student Senator peti- 
tions has been extended 
to Sept. 27 at 12 noon 



^^..vvvvv^vvv^x^^^^^^ 






TIRED OF CAFETERIA FOOD? 

JULY'S 



is jutt minutct away' 



S 



O 

o 

z 




-^^m: 



■^^^ 398-8185 

847 Algonquin Rd. 

•Next Jo Beef 'N" Barrel' 
Schaumburg 



VIENNA RED HOTS 

POUSH SAUSAGE 

ITALIAN BEEF 

CHAR-CO- BURGER 

TAMALES 

SANDVMCHES INCLUDE TRIMMINGS 

AND FRENCH FRIES 

CREAMY THICK SHAKES and MALTS 



In the Algonquin 



Hour* - 9 a.in.-8 p.m. Daily 



I 



Sept. 24. 1973 



THE HARBINGER 



JSR[\ni rlieryone 0l]auld knohi about druqg 
but i6 afraid to ask 



By RON ZOBERIS 

Does anyone really know 
what they are buying when 
they go out and cop that 
weekend lid or those daily 
tabs of beauiiful acid? Well 
If you dig your drugs, like 
most people, you must then 
have the same scene as 
your fellow man; picking 
up some dynamite stuff! 
It is getting harder and 
harder every week to pick 
up any thing worth talking 
about. Still we all sooner 
or later run into our big- 
gest problem of all and 
that is getting burnt What 
a bad trip! 

For those of interest, 
listed for you here are a 
few reports that over th 
past few months were un- 
covered to help you see 
what difficulty might lie 
ahead of you in your next 
buy. 

The most dangerous drug 
analyized in the last few 
months have, contained 
some extremely strong 
doses of PCP This is 
usually sold asAngelDust. 
THC or PCP and over the 
last two months about five 
samples were almost pure 
The problem with this is 
that when the PCP is this 
strong it has a highbisn- 



merpotential and it can 
cause overdose even when 
smoked. Drinking with PCP 
is particularly dangerous 
when it is this strong Re- 
member that all Angel 
Dust and all the THC that's 
on the street is always 
PCP So be sure to be 
czreful of what you smoke 
or snort. 

A sample of what looks 
like* light brown powder 
was sold as Cocaine and 
was analyzed to be no drug 
at all. One of two samples 
of Mescaline one month 
was a light green tab that 
was actually LSD. The sec- 
ond, starch with a very 
small amount of acid in it 
This appeared as a white 
powder in a xlear capsule 

Last month there was a 
sample that was sold as 
THC. cocaine and smak 
combination, that wa anal- 
yzed as a heavy dose of 
PCP Several people hav- 
ing taken this reported that 
they experience side ef- 
fects of their arms and 
legs turning numb ^long 
with a space feeling which 
lasted as long as three or 
four days later Over tbe 
past few months there has 
been an increasing number 
of mis -represented mes- 
caline samples that turned 



out to be a combination of 
LSD and PCP. These to- 
gether represent an animal 
tranquilizer. Remember 
that real mescaline is so 
expensive, and that LSD 
and PCP are so incred- 
ibly cheap to make, that 
chemists are not going to 
lose money just because 
there is a demand for mes- 
caline. Organic mescaline 
is just as expensive as 
synthetic mescaline, and 
it rarely appears unless 
you make it yourself out 
of the original product. Real 
mescaline appears inatwut 
one out of every 500 to 
600 samples, so you must 
use discretion. 

There were three hits 
of quaelude from the south 
side turned out to be just 
plain caffeine These were 
white tabs double -scored 
If the quaalude doesn't have 
a number712 or714 stamp 
ed on it, then it isn t phar 
maceutical. and may 

contain anything Mari- 
juana laced with opium, a 
combination designed to 
hook kids on narcotics, is 
beginning to come into the 
United Sutes This spiked 
pot is t)eing distributed 
by Asiatic dope peddlers 
and sold as straight mari- 
juana. 



Women's workshop examines 



Ski 



(From page 10) 



''The right to know 



99 



A women's workshop at 
Harper College on Sept 26 
will examine the topic. 
'The Right to Know 
Our Most Fundamental 
Freedom." Open (o all in- 
terested women, the sem- 
inar is part of a series of 
workshops on "Women 
in Politics and Govern- 
ment." Women who attend 
four or more of the series 
will receive free adtnission 
to the Nov. 8 lecture at 
Harper by US Congress - 
woman Bella AbsAig of New 
York. 

The program is under the 
direction of Rena Trevor, 
member of the college 
Women's Advisory Board, 
.and will include a four- 
member board of spec- 
ialists Panel members 
are Edward S. Gilbraith. 
political editor ofthe 
Chicago Daily News and 
the person who coordinat - 
ed his paper's coverage 
of the Illinois Constitution- 
al Convention; Bob Lahey, 
political edi.or of Paddock 
Publications. Madeline 

Schroeder, an Arlington 
Heights Plan Commission - 
member, and Joan Kluss- 
mann. school bodrd mem- 
ber from district 25 and a 
former newspaperwoman 

The Sept. 26 workshop 



will t)e held in room A 
242 from 1 00- 3 30 pm A 
fee of $3 ischarged Bat)y- 
sitting is available at $1 - 
25 per child if prior no- 
tice is given by calling 
397-3000. extension 30r. 



dividuals For those who 
have little funds, there will 
be fund-raising projects for 
all to pursue 

The first meeting will be 
held Tuesday. Sept. 25. at 
12,15 pm till 2 00. inbuild- 
ing F-312 Everyone is in- 
vited, from beginners to ex- 
perts. 




FRUSTRAfED? 

CAN'T FIND PANTS 
THAT FIT? 

Let 



SEND YOU BACK TO SCHOOL 
S7 TE£ SEAT OF TOUR FAKTS 

PANTS ARE AVAIlABtE IN 
SHORT OR SUPER lONGS. 

(Sites 21 SfoM Long) 

It the ssat of your fants 




S7N •OTMWBi-rAUkTmi PHONE 

(NCXTTOOWTYNtUJnniSMfU*) ISI-MM 

DOWNTOWN f AlATINf 



HOURS: MON , TUES. 
WED. II t« «, THURS. 
FRI. II to », SAT. »C 

T" c 



Page 3 




GUITARS 
ARE LIKE 
PEOPLE 



NO TWO 
ARE THE 
SAME, . . 



So let our experts help you 
choose a guitar that really 
"Fits." 

Stop in and "strum" our 
strings to compare our guitars 
for quality, performance and 
price. 



i= 



^oore 



Jack Jfh 
^^-- J flu sic Cen/er 



WOODFIELDMALL 
SCHAUMBERG 

882-1434 
(insid« Wurlitzer) 







Mitly 



An engagement ring 
with a Continental heritage: 

Light bursting 
Irom a band ol lace . . . 

eight diamonds clustered 

in starlight . „ 

f 

and each leaf 

in the band individually 

handpolished. 

Holly. 

■ As unique as it is beauiiful. 

Just in lime tor happiness. 

Just in time for love. 



Flaharty Jewelers 

2 North Dunton 
Arlington Hts., 111. 



MH 



^' 



• * V - 



c 




/ 



Page 4 



ccccaounvTiV 



tklitorial Comment 

The Harper Administration threatens to make the col- 
lege "an overblown, disputed and generally bad institu- 
tioa" Those are strong and serious charges that Robert 
Powell. President of Faculty Senate made in his speech 
to the faculty the week before classes started. Unfortun- 
ately, this statement could turn into reality if proper 
attention is not given by the Harper Board of Trustees. 

Since then, two weeks have past and "the faculty 
is as angry as Robert Powell has ever seen a college 
faculty," as he stressed at a recent Sept. 13 board meet- 
ing. 

What Mr. Powell would like to see happen at Harper 
he says, is simple, "1 would like to see the Faculty Sen- 
ate and the faculty members in the departments apprised 
of what Is going to happen to them before it happens. 
Wh«n facxUty members serve on a committee, they should 
know where the decision is reversed and why the col- 
lege board should be made aware of strong dissenting 
opinions on thcfaculty when recommendations are brought 

to them." 

In addition, "many programs are developed because 
of a real need, but others are only the product of good 
salesmanship. Community colleges lend to build their 
own empires." stated Powell. 

Powell believes that Harper's emphasis on large lec- 
ture classes is wrong. "Other community colleges do not 
emphasize large lectures because the boost has been that 
there is more contact with the teachers at community 
colleges than at large universities," he says. 

He also critlzed the emphasis In the college toward 
"management" rather than teaching and said large 
class sizes and teacher loads mean a student who 
leaves Harper "has done less writing and has had 
less faculty criticism of his thought processes than stu- 
dents from other colleges in their state." 

In an evasive reply by Board President Jfssalyn Nick- 
las, she came to the conclusion that "the reputation of the 
college In the community reflects the kind of education- 
al job It Is doing." She also said the board would meet 
with the faculty only after going through the agenda pro- 
cedures. 

It may be too early to decide whether the faculty 
charges are true, but we would rather see Investigative 
action FAST, on the part of the board, as to the serious- 
ness of these charges. 



THE RARBINGER 



Sept. 24. 1973 




'•nv 



Editor-in-chief 
Managing Editor 
BusincHN Manager 
Activities Editor 
Sports Editor 
Fhotn Editor 



Diane DeRartolomeo 
Steve Bowman 
Gary Zdeb 
Sieve Scholsser 
Phil BaMaglla. 
Larry Kiel 



AdviHor - Mr. Sturdevant 



The HARBINGER is the student publication for the 
Harper College campus communit>'. published weekly 
except during holidays and mid-terms. All opinions 
expressed on the editorial page or In the columns are 
those of the writer, and are not necessarily those of the 
college, iti administration, faculty or student body. 

For information chi advertising, rates and publica- 
tion schedule, call or write Harbinger Business 
Office 

William Rainey Harper College. Algonquin and 
Roselle Rds , Palatine. Illinois. 60067 Phone nuni 
her 359-4200. ext 272 and 460 



I feel alone and ignored 




Printed by permission of Paddock Publications. 



Harper Student Senate meeting 



By GEORGE POLALES 111 

Harper College is an in- 
stitution that offers many 
things to many people. To 
be entertained: go to the 
plays. concerts . and 
movies shown weekly. To 
be enlightened; read the 
literary magazine, sll In 
on our teacher's lectures, 
and watch how the food Is 
made inoui cafeteria If 
yet ones wish Is to be 
bored, ah yes' Is this 
the true test of an egali- 
tarian society? To Y>e able 
to furnish an activity to the 
liking of agroup of stu- 
dents even if it be but 
one. 

I assure you. dear 
students, those of you who 
wish to be bored beyond 
all Freudian fancies, have 
no farther than to look in 
on the student government 
meetings. 



In all fairness to our 
student senate most of the 
problem relates fromapa- 
fhy on the part of the stu- 
dent body. There is an al- 
most total unwillingness to 
want to gel Involved. At this 
moment there is a need for 
^■^■good candidates to come 
forward and fill the va- 
cancies on th student sen- 
ate. I hope all students will 
become aware of their res - 
pon.slhilities in the upcom- 
ing elections and at least 
I vote. 
Robert Hayhurst is a 



bright spark in th darken- 
ing situation surrounding 
student government at Har - 



per College If the council 
is saved he will surely have 
been responsible. 



IINFUrmV 



Dear Sir: 

In the past five years I 
have attended Harper Col- 
lege on a part lime basis in 
the evening Duringthaltime 
I have been frequently in- 
convenienced by the students 
(I presume) involved in the 
safety program who patrol 
and direct traffic at the col- 
lege 

As they are in training 
I have expected some digres- 
sion from accepted stan- 
dards of behavior and some 
attempts at self aggrandize- 
ment on their part However, 
since school began this fall I 
believe the situation has be- 
come intolerable Each day 
when I take my husband to 
the college to drop him off 
I encounter a snarling stu- 
dent who thoroughly intero- 
gates me as to whv I wish 



"• ^^Pfc ^^^% ^^^% ^^^% ^^^% ^^^% ^^^\ ^^^% ^^^^ ^^^^ 

letters Welcome 



to come closer than a block 
to the building and then in 
his great generosity allows 
me to pass Also the stu- 
dents who arrive at the col- 
lege first are directed to the 
farthest lot from the back of 
the building No one is al- 
lowed to drive on the road 
which forms the outer west- 
ern perimeter of the campus 
and so we must all go back 
out on to Roselle and j(o 
through the traffic intersec- 
tion (which is already so 
overcrowded that cars are 
backed up for blocks in each 
direction) These actions 
seem to defy common sense. 
Although I do not claim to 
know how a future policeman 
should be trained, I have en- 
countered quite a few police- 
men in the local communi- 
ties and have found them to 
be courteous arKi helpful. 
These traits are glaringly 
absent in the students. They 
seem to have forgotten that a 
.policeman deals la a ser- 
vice. 

Sincerely. 
KATHY WATSON 



Sept. 24, 1973 



THE HARBINGER 



Page 5 



Mourning for the sun 



By George Polales 



Santiago's streets no long- 
er are paved with cobble 
stone. Today they use the 
bodies of their citizens. 

Santiago's newspapers no 
longer are printed with the 
ink of truth Today their 
pages are blotted out with 
the blood of its Editors 
Santiago's students no 
longer go to the univers'ity 
with their books Today they 
go into the streets armed 
with banners and chants to 
protest the military junta. 
Armed with these, they die. 
they are butchered, they are 
slaughtered as all dreamers 
are when met face to face 
with reality 

Eduardo Ruvera. a Chil- 
ean university student in 
Graduate Philosophy, a soc- 
ial worker in the back-alley 
slums of Santiago, a cam- 
paign worker for President 
Salvador Allende, a citizen 
who has lived for his coun 
try 22 years, a man, dis- 
gusted and shocked by the 
gestapo tactics employed by 
the Chilean Army He lakes 
to the streets with thousands 
of other students Like hun 
dreds of other students who 
lived for their country the 
Chilean Army will see to it 
that on September 12, 1973 
they will die for it. 

A woman In front of a 
side-walk cafe with her nine 
year old son watches help- 
lessly as she sees the stu- 
dents fall In broken heaps 
Perhaps it is anguish, per- 



haps despair, perhafs cour- 
age, perhaps none, perhaps 
all of these possessed he no 
raise her hand in a defiant 
clenched fist and release 
from her soul the cry "Lib- 
erty " Her only word, her 
last word Bayonets now 
slash at her from all direc- 
tions Her child watches in 
horror as he tries running 
to her defense. A butt of a 
rifle smashes his face Blood 
spurts from his mouth and 
nose In her last tortured 
minutes, the mother, who 
had cradled him in her arms 
at the moment at his birth, 
now cradled in the arms of 
her child at the moment of 
her death With the last ounce 
of strength she pushes him 
away He understands 
Whether it is his blood or his 
mother's that now soaks his 
body is uncertain What is 
certain is that this child is 
weeping Tanks are now roll 
ing in Santiago, rolling down 
the streets In bursts of 
machinegun fire Still weep- 
ing, the child is running, run- 
ning into the street to escape 
the blood and terror, yet no 
one escapes the blood and 
terror in Santiago today But 
this is only a child who 
throws up his hands, he can 
see no reason why the tanks 
still roll This child still 
weeps These tanks still roll 
This child weeps no more 
He lives no more But his 
tears still flow, each drop 
through my eyes 



A knock echos on the of- 
fice door of one of Santiago's 
newsrooms that supports 
Democracy They don't wait 
for an answer The door Is 
battered down, its editors 
rounded up and taken to a 
dirty little alley in back of 
the press rooms. Lined 
against a wall, bound, kneel- 
ing with their backs to their 
assasins. they are systema- 
tically murdered What was 
their crime? 

A worker fixing the street 
in front of the Presidential 
Palace Bombs falling ev- 
erywhere around him Army 
infantry assaults the Palace. 
The worker knows what is 
happening, he knows only loo 
well This man has worked 
45 years for his nation so 
that he might live in dignity 
This man, who voted for 
President Allende so hisna 
lion s citizens might live in 
dignity, can stand no more. 
He shouts. "Long live Presi- 
dent Allende' long live free- 
dom." This man who sought 
to live in freedom will shout 
no more The Generals of 
Chile have given this man 
the freedom to die in the 
rubble of Santiago's streets, 
in front of a burning Pal- 
ace, In front of a dying Pres- 
ident 

Liberty no longer reigns In 
Chile. She was raped in the 
gutters and back -alley's of 
Santiago From those same 
gutters the Junta has taken 
the whore of totalitarianism 



and raised her ~ as Chile's 
new symbol Therewill beno 
protest from this govern- 
ment. Its officials know her 
loo well, they have slept with 
her loo often to denounce 
her. 

Once again in a Catin 
American country freedom 



IS replaced with dictator- 
ship Once again free 
thinkers have paid the price 
for their thoughts, once a- 
gain the CIA. denies in- 
volvement, once again the 
world is made sale for Coca- 
Cola. If only once the world 
could be made safe for 
Democracy. 



STRANGE, 



but this is true 



THE FOJR H(»SEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE 




By STEVE BOWMAN 

For those of you Harper 
students that travel on the 
Palatine Road Express, 
haven't you ever wondered 
who was in charge when that 
road was created? Well I 
shave wondered too. especial - 
ly with the initiation of stop 
signs instead of slop lights 

Anyone who has traveled 
on the route around the 3 to 
5 tie up will know what I 
mean For those don't, you 
are indeed fortunate. 

The lie- up part comes at 
Arlington Heights Road when 
right where there should be a 
slop light, there are stop 
signs The cars involved play 
a sort of Russian Roulette 
to see who goes first There 



Is no courtesy here for the 
most part Its law of the 
jungle. In other words "He 
who has the biggest car or 
true': goes first' " If you are 
unfortunate enough to get 
into the left lane- -forget it. 
because they put In just to 
really foul things up a set 
of stop signs' The signs 
are located In a very con- 
venient spot right In the 
middle of the North - South 
intersection. t)etween East 
and West roads. So people 
have been known to sit and 
wait and wait and wait I 
know, I've been there and 
back Going bananas? I wel- 
come any comments on this 
issue Bring them to room 
A 36 7 Remember. 

STRANGE. BUT THIS IS 
TRUE 



"**••! 

HIGHEST RATING! ^NY D«iiy n«ws 

"EASILY ONE OF THE BEST OF THE YEAR 
IN ANY CATEGORY!" 

-Richard Schickel, Time Mag 
"A RARE EVENT IN THE CINEMA-a movie 
that takes the elements of heartbreak 
and tenderness and love that made 'Love 
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elevates them to a more artful achieve- 
ment. A TOTALLY WINNING EXPERI- 
ENCE!" _Rei Reed 

"ONE OF THE LOVELIEST OF FILMS! 
De Niro's performance Is 
extraordinary. A CLEAN HIT!" 

_ _.p-«»ntrG«ne Shaht, NBC TV Today Show 

Bang the drum slowly 

Rctoert De hko Mchaei Mon^fy Vinoeni Gttdena »• -=~~^s 



> 




**«mount nc»u»w Presents 



inrTTi:Tin5T 



CHICAGOLAND THEATRES 



CHICAGO 
NORfM 

PLAYBOY 

1 704 N DfARBOBN 



CHICAGO CHICAGO 

SOUTHWfST NORTH 

EVERGREEN I LINCOLN 
VILLAGE 



SUBURBAN NORTH I SUBURBAN WfST I SUBURBAN 



CINEMA I 

OCERflElO 



HIUSIDI 



NORRIDGE I 

NORRIOGI 



s. 



9* 



A 



"1 ' — 



Page 6 



THE HARBINGER 



Sept. 24. 1973 



Sept. 24, 1973 



THE HARBINGER 



Page 7 



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full 




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rs- 


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ACROSS 


43 Building vings 

44 Kellogg Pact 


1 drinks copiously 


4« •ritlth Isl« 


7 Tjrpt of pitch 


47 In the Manner of 


13 Ordor to appMr In 


48 SutMH) of NaMtrk 


court 


49 Quarrel 


IS Hot 


SO IMIstrlct 


U Ttbit 1t«i 


S2 (Mgntflod rIctatMS 


17 Saylngt 


M MMrs aMy 


ia OncortM 


St Si*tract«d 


19 Smilttr 


S« Hn^lUry rulor 


2» ^glpy fndt 
22 Popular tuffli 


S7 Nana and Monica 




23 M iMbltlout 


DOWN 


24 Viuart 




2S On r*Mrv« 


1 location of 1939 


27 Pr«f1i: outtldo 


World's Fair 


21 Irvt 


2 large-llppod* 


t* LMftH loudly 
31 OonTtn 


African no^an 


3 Church titcnslon 


32 In foct 


4 Owdy 


34 UUtrtU 


S Feudal ettatos: 


3S Coll Oft grounds 


»ar. 


yk Irlof oMd to t»w 


4 Tho art of aoddllng 


Mint 
37 hoc* of study 


7 door 




(colltft llnfo) 


9 oing Deng 

Oaddy ..? 


3a Striko out 


39 Irregular, at If 


10 Lnvontor of oarly 


9Mi«4 (My 


photograph 



11 Typo of shoe 

12 S«cond-h«nd dNis 
)} Groove 

14 Capers 

20 Flanlst Tatua 

23 God of the Kinds 

24 Nathan Kale. e.g. 
26 Curtains 

28 Quieted 

30 SMtth and Capp 

31 Mager 

32 Sood-natured 
ridicule 

33 Decorate alth 
bright colors 

34 Uses trickery 

35 Profited 
38 tftirt 

38 — Olavelo 

40 Connective tissues 

41 Adds xest to 

42 Temi noted 

44 Treaty of 
Lttovsk 

45 'Croat art does not 
theory'— Meed 

48 Nuaber (pi.) 

49 AcUallty 

SI Mooa In a her«i 
S3 HMpen 

ioliitlon on pat» "^ 



^STUNNING! BEAUTIFUL! QREATl 

PERFECT! BREATHTAKINQ! 

PKmmiEOF THE MONTH ! A JOY I 

BEAUT(FUL! PASSIONATE!" 

Paramount Pictures takes great 
pride and pleasure in presenting 
to the Annerican public the return 
of the greatest love story of all time. 



r«a«tiiM%tni-nM'< 

rw 




Kran<:<»Zki>irklu 

Romeo 

"r^JlLIET 




PO 



liMIMK WTM« HMifll mWifn MfffMi/ 

...IMIMiariMMirMa/ 
MWIifRII-IIMailRlilMII 



■^. IMfflT 



■fwwnn* Tt 



NOW PLAYING AT A THEATRE 
OR ORIVEIN NEAR YOU 



9ort 

Gort.ftvi party 
Mant« VOUto 
run(!ora seat 
in the Senate! 



Mo thanks. But 

a me5ofiippus 

Moutd hiake 

a perCect 

Senator.' 




MH<flQ».agUnf .^H^^' 



AUOttMmthe 
SanatcTfDont 
maka jokes 
about SUCH *i 

Ouguat 
inetitutKyiT 



I'm not. All 
y'ncad t'do la 
build a rtarrow 
atall Por Heti 
with* 
chamber. 




Ua can't 

iMhoavar 
heard oTa 

taciUjm 
6*iator? 



'ab«n 
<« to b« voted 
upon, ha can 




But haVi uen iook cxacttu 

etickout Ilka a« the other 

I'ka a €anatorB i^uouli 

9ore lead hnieitoh« atall 

thumbf Aeiipoea him tithe 




Iim Distoir{tn(0)ini 



Hard course to flunk 

CAMBRIDGE. Engl and 
(UPI) - - Like to study the 
art of doing nothing? 

A course in doing just that 
begins soon at the Coleridge 
Night School Students can sit 
in a classroom chair and 
sleep, read, write or Just 
gaze. 

The course, which costs 
$3.75, is without a teacher 
"There will not be a tutor," 
said a school spokesman. 
"No one is going to teach 
them to be quiet." 



Lot of noise over sei 

LONDON (AP) A mem 
ber of Parliament said he 
would ask for an urgent gov- 
ernment investigation into 
whether excessive noise, 
such as factory noise, is 
harmful to a man's sex life. 
The Labor Party legislator. 
Tom Torney, is from the in- 
dustrial town of Bradford. 



laxatives solve crime 

PRAGUE (AP) - Farmers 
in the Czech town of Valtice 
injected laxatives into their 
nearly ripened melons in an 
effort to find those respon- 



sible for nu'lon thefts, the 
newspaper Mlada Fronta re- 
ported. The thieves turned 
out to be a herd of deer, 
the newspaper said. 

Where there's sioko 

' KRAMFORS. Sweden (AP) 
-- A - 30-year-old factory 
worker enlisted as a reserv- 
ist fireman to supplement 
his income and reportedly 
earned about $175 fighting 
fires in a single month His 
fireman duties came to an 
end when he was accused 
of setting 10 of the fires. 

County goes to rescue 
of angler losing pants 

CAMBRIDGE. Ohio (AP)- 
The Guernsey County under- 
water rescue unit was called 
out recently to fish a pair 
of pants out of the water at 
Salt Fork State Park 

Deputies said a man fish- 
ing with two friends stripped 
to his swimming trunks and 
put his pants over the stern 
of the boat When he threw 
the anchor overboard, his 
pants went with it- -and so 
did the $800 he had in the 
pants. 

The rescue unit recovered 
the pants -and a soggy $800 



THE H.I.A. REPORT 



By GARRIK 

Have you seen any ne- 
farious misdoings around 
campus lately? Have you 
noticed any underhanded 
undertakings in the parkihg 
lot, or at the base of the 
stairs? Heard any rumors 
of an armed takeover of 
the administrative ofTices, of 
perhaps a mass execution of 
students with overdue park- 
ing fines from last year. May- 
be you have a chornlc case 
of paranoia because of the 
guy in the trench coat and 
barefcct who follows you 
around campus. Or you keep 
getting bills for your fees 
which you have already paid 
and the lady tells you that the 
computer never makes mis- 
takes. Is that your problem 
bunky? WELL PKRK UP, 
WALK TALL, AND HAVE 
CONFIDENCE THAT 
THERE'S ALWAYS SOME- 
ONE WHO'S ON YOUR 
SIDE. 

The Harbinger announces 
the formation of the Har- 
binger Intelligence Agency. 
An Investigative service 
available to students, ded- 



icated to Truth, Jubtjct:, and 
the American Way. 

Not since the Desperados 
Hot Mush Straight Shooters 
Club has there been assem- 
bled a band of such valiant 
and tireless mudslingers. We 
will do our best to dirty 
the faces of proven dirty do- 
ers who give you grief. We 
will be the "Action Express" 
of the college. But, remember 
that no group can survive 
without a raison d'etre, and 
that apathy and constipa- 
tion are synonymous. Like 
any good Intelligence Agen- 



cy we can stir up a coup 
or two in some little known 
far removed place, but If 
we expect to keep up with 
the Pentagon we need your 
help. So come on Straight 
Shooters, take down your 
pants, sit down, and grunt 
up something for us to do. 

Bring your specimens to 
the Harbinger office, up- 
stairs in "A" building next 
door to the financial aids of- 
fice, (in an unmarked plain 
brown paper envelope 
please. ) 




WIGS 

SALES AND SERVICE 



Closed on Men. 




aixdxe.i.i.in 



£ns 1 



cSaLon 



FOR A l-OVUER YOU 




For a lovlier you 
PHONE: 381-4499 



612 SOITH VORTHWKST HUY. 
BARRI\CTO\. ILLINOIS 6(M) 10 



m^. 





"The 
authentic 
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In the 
Suburbs! 

Stnttng specialf I'es of: 

Irish coffee - 

So<M fopt at used by AAik* Ryan el fh« Shannon Airport 

Traditional Folk Musk rver>' nixht exctpl Mo. 

"MOVDAY NIGHT i-(M)IBALL" 

and 2.5C Bmth ALL NIGHT. 

B«Kpipe Band on Swndav NITE 

DRINK 1/2 PRICE WITH AD ^ 

double DRINKS - For Only ll.OCr^W 

^fibthweW'' 



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Houar lo dean 

Thursday or Friday- 
Own Trantporiatiun 
m-4731 

Warrhouae Man 

Part-lime Job* in clean mudem 

warehouse in 1-llk (iruvc. 

No experiene required. 

Hone Mr. Judd 

439-9000 

R»r Sale 

Forlable Smith/Corona typewriter 

•SO. Call aM4«97. 

For Sale 

Mini BIKE 

^.h Horsepower $125.00 

S94-7874 

Hoaae to Clean 
Thurtdaysor Friday 
Own Transporlatiun. 
281-4731 



Help Wanted 

Clean young man to deliver food. 
Tues. & Wed*. Mr. :4:3O-n:30p.m 
Steady. Daviln* 359-7267 
after 3:30 p.m. 

Seno Formal Wear 

Woodfleld Commons NhoppinK 
Center. 1223 (iolf Rd 882-4300 
Wanted male lu work in retail »true. 
Later afternouns, eveninfft & Sat. 
Call (or further information. 

Public Relatiomi 

need personable well Rroomed 
younK men & women lu call on 
local companies. For Blair Bus 
Service Inc. Hours & days flexible 
No .Sellinii S2..50 per hour. 

.3.<>»-(iMn 

Full A Part Time 

Immediate ttprninK, Day A * 
Kvi'. Shift, work around collcKC 
schedule. Weekdays or Sat. 
l.iKhl wprk new facilities, 
(nil or Apply KST ( o 
298-7I20. 



Once in a Paper Moon 



By DIANE DiBARTOLOMEO 

PAPER MOON is another of 
director Peter Bpgdono- 
vich"s movie - movies, a 
black-and-white tribute (like 
"Last Picture Show") to 
movies of a generation ago 
(like "What's Up, Doc'") 
and the way they entertained 
arid affected us If your mov- 
ie experieiKe doesn't go back 
at least 20 years, you'll miss 
much of the subtle richness 
of "Moon," although you may 
still er\joy it as a charming 
oddball of a 1973 flick. 

The road companions are 
usually young - and - old . and 
here they are a small - town 
con - man (Ryan O'Neal), 
touring the backroads of 
rural 1930's Kansas, bilking 
widows of mopey for bibles 
supposedly ordered by their 
deceased spouses, and a pre- 
sumably innocent girl -child 
(Ryan's real-life daughter. 
Tatum) She is an orphan 
being delivered to an aunt 
is St Joe. and may be the 
philandering hero's child. 
they develop an affectionate 
father -daughter relationship 
that is far more genuine 
than any of the "paper 



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Page 8 



THE HARBINGER 



Sept. 24. 1973 



Sept. 24, 1973 



THE HARBINGER 



Page 9 



GRASSROOTS REVIEW 



By E.K. SINNOTT 



It occurs to this reviewer 

that the sponsors of last 
week's Grassroots perfor- 
mance would have been wiser 
than to refer to this event 
as a "concert." 

For ^ is in the context of 
this term, (and ultimately.' 
only that term) that the idea 
can be labeled a failure 

Early last week, this con- 
cert had been all birt dis- 
missed by many students who 
considered the Grassroots' 
sound as somewhat beneath 
their level of sophistication, 
which in turn may account 



for the relatively paltry ad- 
vance ticket sales 

However, a primary ob- 
jective of the evening was to 
induce the attendance of high 
school (and younger) stu- 
dents from surrounding 
communities Judging by the 
somewhat sizable number of 
sixteen -year -olds, it seems 
safe to say that that goal 
was well achieved 

One objective that wasn't 
was that of providing a rea- 
sonable "stage" perfor- 
mance from the attending 
cast of musicians. 

Those who took the time to 
actually look at the perform- 



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ers might have noticed al- 
most nothing, except a com- 
plete lack of communication 
on their part. I have come to 
the conclusion that only 
Stevie Wonder has less vis- 
ually to do with his audience 
than the Grassroots' lead 
singer. 

Unsuccessfully, 1 tried to 
catch one or two phrases 
passed among the musicians 
between numbers. 

Towards the end of the set, 
some restitution was at- 
tempted as the band's lead- 
er mumbled some involun- 
tary passages concerning 
Mick Jaegger, Palatines 
size, etc. 

Most of the audience 
seemed to care little about 
recognition, however, and 
there is something refresh- 
ing about a group that fails 
to trade esoteric quips, ala 
Eyewitness News, with their 
roadies and first - ram 



chicks. 

In order to maintain a de- 
gree of fairness, I think it's 
important to mention that 
much of what I found pro and 
con about the event was en- 
tirely subjective to the in- 
dividual's taste. 

Several of the drawbacks 
I've considered were ob- 
viously taken as positive 
qualities by others, at least 
that was the impression I 
sometimes got. An example 
of this was the not -insig- 
nificant number in atten- 
dance who preferred to treat 
the evening as an expensive 
sock- hop 

For this purpose the event 
was more than adequate 

The group was tight in 
their playing. 

Tlie material was of ro- 
mantic nature 

And there was even a good 
sized dance floor in the car- 
peted area of the lounge 



which is usually vacant be- 
cause the stage isn't visible 
in that space. 

The only lacking physical 
quality that might be dis- 
cussed was the ever notice- 
able poor acoustic texture 
to the lounge, which, although 
certainly isn't new, gave an 
extra annoyance to the peo- 
ple trying to dance 

All in all, though, the eve- 
ning appeared to be fairly 
rewarding Particularly for 
the younger guests, there 
was a generally upbeat feel- 
ing to the entire scene. 

Even the older (18- 22 year 
olds) seemed to be enjoying 
the night, perhaps due to a 
nostalgic interest rekindled 
by some of the band's older 
songs, which, most apprec- 
iably, weren't done to death. 

Next week, A reviewing of 
the new Art Garfunkel al- 
bum. 



(Frmi 



1) 



Paper Moon 



meted out with almost Greek 
precision, but the c hie f plea ' 
sure comes from Bogdono 
vichs detailed re-creation 
of the mood and settings of 



Depression Mid - America, 
down to the radio programs 
little Tatum is addicted to 
Miss O Neal is a fascinating 
new personality (lovable, but 
not the sugar-and-spice 



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"7 



Page 10 



THE HARBINGER 



Sept. 24, 1973 



Get to know the real Gelch 



By Fearless Freelance 
Sports Jock 

John Gelch, Director of 
Athletics, has been working 
for the staff and students of 




Athletic Director John Gelch 



Harper College for ^produc- 
tive years. Gelch graduated 
from Southern 111 in 1957 
after playing 1 year of bas- 
ketball and 3 years of regu - 
lar football. He received his 
Masters in 1958 in Physi- 
cal Education While work- 
ing on his Masters, he was 
an assistant coach for South 
High 1962 found him teach- 
ing and coaching basketball, 
baseball and assisting foot- 
ball and track at South High 
School. One year before 
coming to Harper, he as- 



sisted the coaching staff in 
both football and basketball 
at 111 State in 1966-67. 

When Gelch arrived at 
Harper in '67 there was no 
set programs for the Ath- 
letic Dep>t. Working with Rog 
Herns and Martha Bolt, he 
completely built the depart; 
ment from nothing to a well 
organized efficient team of 
instructors and coaches 

One of the best points of 
his department is that all 
of the coaches in the major 
sports are available on cam- 
pus so that if any of the 
athletes have questions or 
problems, they can get in 
touch with their respective 
coaches easily. 

Some of tlie major res- 
ponsibilities of his includes 
overseeing the active Phy 
Ed. Program involving the 
set-up of the schedules for 
all of the coaches To make 
sure that everything that is 
in his department is done 
safely, to take care of the 
equipment and deal with the 
Administration when prob- 
lems arise with the coach- 
es. 

Future Plans are to re- 
organize the Physical Ed 
Department so that it can be 
the same as it was before 
the destruction of the field- 
house. 

We congratulate John 
Gelch for what he has done 
and we wish him and his de- 
partment Good Luck for the 
Future. 



Think Sn9w 



Ski into action 



By PHILL BATTAGLIA 

THINK SNOW! That s what 
many of the skiers, both be- 
ginners and experts, are do- 




ing right now. because its 
getting very close to that 
time of the year The Harper 
Ski Club staff. Yvonne Tagge. 
(President), and Kathy Di 
duch (V P ). are also think- 
ing snow, and are doing 
something about it. 

Yvonne and Kathy have 
started a Ski Club at Har 
per and are looking forward 
to making it the biggest and 
the best They have drawn 
up a very impressive pro- 
gram for this year, consist- 
ing of weekend trips, parties, 
and a lot of excitement and 
fun 

Yvonne and Kathy will also 
assist in beginning instruc- 
tion and helping find the 
right equipment for the in- 



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Harper buries Dupage 




Harper's defense at work. (Photo by Chuck Zemeske) 



By Phil Battaclia 

The third Harper football 
season got under way on 
Sept. 15. where the Hawks 
were out against the Chap- 
panals of DuPage. The Hawks 
opened the season with a 
27-0 victory, putting a big 
smile on coach Eliaslk's 
face. 

Saturday night the game 
was held at Downers Grove 
North High School. In the 



first quarter Harper made 
their first touchdown, and 
from then on it was com- 
pletely uphill for the Hawks. 
A second touchdown was 
made shortly afteronashort 
punt, giving the Hawks pos- 
session at tfte* DuPage 16 
yard line, and then carried 
by Williams 14 yds for com- 
pletion ending the first -half 
leaving the Hawks with a 
14-0 lead 



In the second half Wil- 
liams came thorugh again 
with a 1 yard run for the 
third touchdown in the game 
leaving the Hawks with 20-0 
lead 

The fourth touchdown was 
completed brilliantly by 
Schnurstein on a 71 yard 
run on pass^ interception 
leaving the Hawks with the 
27-0 victory 

After the game Elaisk 
stated that the victory was 
due mostly because of the 
defense: The defense kept 
the game going and kept up 
the morale of all the play- 
ers. "Everyone got a chance 
to play in the game and it 
gave us a good picture of 
,the team. Defensively we 
were very strong and it kept 
DuPage from gaining mo- 
mentum, but offensively we 
just weren't hitting our re- 
ceivers. Eventually, how- 
ever, the offense will be a 
strong point for us. 

Total yards for the Hawks 
was 139. as compared to 
DuPage's 125 yards. 



HARPER 
DU PAGE 



7-7-13 0-27 
0-0-0 0-0 




Harper scores an extra point 



A new P«E« program offered 



This year. Harperwill be 
offering, for the first time. 
a new credit course from 
their physical education 
program The course be- 
ing offered is Ice Skating, 
which will begin on Nov. 
5 and run until the end 



of the semester. 

The class will begin at 

9 00 am an run until 

10 30 am every Tuesday 
and Thursday at Rolling 
Meadows Rink, located at 
3900 Owl Drive CoachRoy 
Kearns. who will be the 



instructor, is very quali- 
fied and will help to ex- 
pand the beginner's knowl- 
edge of this sport Dead- 
line for registration is 
Nov. 5. 



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HARPER'S FIELD HOUSE GAINS GROUND 



By DIANE DiBARTOLOMEO 

There has been a vast 
amount of discussion within 
the past two months as to the 



rebuilding tA the Harper 
Field House The most sig- 
nificant question being aim - 
ed is, to what direction 



Drinking age law 
passed for 19- year- olds 



By SUE POLLACK 

"To be or not to be" 
for the 15 million 18 to 20- 
year - olds in the United 
States, it has often been the 
question of at what age they 
become adults The answer 
varied, it seemed, with the 
situation: a "minor" need- 
ed parental permission to 
get married, for instance, 
but could get divorced with- 
out It; he could be tried 
for a crime as an adult, 
but wasn't allowed to serve 
on a Jury: he was eligible 
for the draft, but not to 
drink or vote. 

Now. however, this age 
group is achieving more con- 
sistency in the laws repird- 
ing their rights, along with 
getting closer to gaining the 
status of adult under all 



terms. With the passing dL 
House Bill 200 last June, 
Illinois youth are allowed 
yet another privilege as of 
Oct 1; that of buying, and 
therefore legally drinking, 
wine and beer. 

Do Harper College stu- 
dents see this as a big step 
forward? "Hardly," one 19- 
year-old commented. "It'll 
be convenient to buy the 
stuff without a hassle, al- 
right, but we've been drink- 
ing it for years, anyway." 
Other students, too. ex- 
pressed the view that the new 
law is overdue, and that 
they wished the representa- 
tives in Springfield would 
"wake up" to the fact that, 
by 19. most people are not 
only responsible enough to 

(Turn to page 3) 



will the Harper Admin- 
istration turn now. 

The most recent solution 
revealed looks promising. 

The Harper Administra- 
tion will take action Tuesday 
October 2. as they go before 
the Illinois Junior College 
Board and Legislature to pre- 
sent solutions to the prob- 
lem. 

Three alternatives have 
been drawn up by the Phys- 
ical Ed. Dept. at Harper 

To avoid red tape. Harper 
can resolve to building a 
temporary structure with 
what is left in tKe insurance 
policy The disadvantage in 



this alternative being that the 
claim has yet to be settled, 
will take at least one year 
Another approach is to 
build the Phys. Ed. facility 
in Building M of the master 
plan. The one obstacle lies in 
the fact that because of 
Walker's veto the master 
plan has also been vetoed 
and is insignificant. 

The third alternative 
which seems to ^ the best 
solution is to initiate a new 
master plan, placing the 
field house at the top of the 
priority list 

When William Mann. Vice 
Presidertt of Business Af- 



fairs at Harper, goes be- 
fore the Illinois Junior Col- 
lege Board this Tuesday, 
he will appeal to the third 
alternative. 

In a recent letter address- 
ed to Dr. Naren of the Jun- 
ior College Board. Dr Mann 
takes a strong stand; "The 
priority order of the build- 
ings shown in our '75 Cap- 
ital Funding Request was af- 
fected by the governor's 
veto of our emergency ap- 
propriation Our very suc- 
cessful and ongoing physical 
education program was badly 
crippled by the fire loss. 

(Turn to page 6) 



Harper welcomes new security chief 



By RONALD POREP 

Students usually think of 
the men from the Harper 
Public Safety Department 
as ogres who enjoy hand- 
ing out traffic tickets and 
picking on students in gen- 
eral 

Paul Swanson. Harper's 
ne^r acting chief of that de- 
partment, has set out to 



Community leaders appointed 
to Harper educational foundation 



Appointments to the newly 
created William Rainey Har- 
per College Educational 
Foundation have been com- 
pleted. The Foundation be- 
came a legal entity June 7 
in accordance with appro- 
priate state procedures 

The next steps toward op- 
eration of the Foundation 
will be selection of officers 
and approval of bylaws when 
the twelve Foundation direc- 
tors hold their first meeting 
in late September 

Bylav-s will be submitted 
to the Harper College board 
of Trustees fpr approval, 
then to the United States In- 
ternal Revenue Service for 
tax exempt status. 

Foundation directors are: 

Robert Ate her. mayor of 
Schaumburg and well-known 
leader in ti.e community. 

Ray J Blakeman, presi- 
dent of Spotnails, Inc.. Roll- 
ing Meadows 

Roger A Bjorvik. pros- 
ecuting attorney for the Vil- 
lage of Palatine and Pala- 
tine Park District. 

Mrs. Virginia Hayter, 



mayor of Hoffman Estates. 

John Kuranz, senior Vice 
President of G. D. Searle 
& Company. Des Plaines. 
Kuranz is a Barrington Hills 
resident. 

Dr. Robert E. Lahti. pre.s- 
ident of William Rainey Har- 
per College. 

James R. Lancaster of 
Mount Prospect, who is 
president of the Bank of Elk 
Grove and a director of 
Hyde Park Bank & Trust 

Mrs Marilyn Marier. 
Harper College trustee, of 
Arlington Heights 

Jack Pahl. former pres- 
ident of Elk Grove Village 

William J Pailey. Sr . 
business executive and res- 
ident of Buffalo Grove 

William Simpson, co-own- 
er of 645 Electronic Dis- 
tributors Corporation, 
Wheeling, and vice president 
of Mykroy, Inc Arlington 
Heights 

John G. Woods, vice pres- 
ident and general counsel for 
Universal Oil Products 
Company, Des Plaines 

Directors of the William 



Rainey Harper College Ed- 
ucational Foundation will 
serve on a staggered term 
basis. 

The Foundation was or- 
ganized to assist in devel- 
oping and augmenting the fa- 
cilities of Harper College 
for the purpose of provid - 
ing broader educational op- 
portunities in the college 
community 

Responsibilities of Foun- 
dation directors will in- 
clude encouragement of 
gifts, grants and other forms 
of contributions to the col- 
lege These funds and gifts 
would provide the college 
with much needed resources 
for special educational proj- 
ects, and make possible the 
establishment of endow- 
ments and expansion of 
scholarship opportunities. 
Other uses might be to- 
ward buildings and equip- 
ment The Foundation will 
also be in charge of gifts 
or loans of works of art. 
historical papers and docu- 
ments, and museum speci- 
mfens. 



prove to students that this 
just is not so 

"My job is actually to 
help the students where I 
can. I try to keep this cam- 
pus as tazard free as pos- 
sible. For all but the most 
serious violations, we usual- 
ly warn students rather than 
give out tickets or arrest 
them We want to be the 
friends of the students rather 
than their enemies." ex- 
plained Swanson 

Without his uniform. Act- 
ing Chief Swanson looks like 
any student on this campus 
with his medium -length 
blond hair and horn- rimmed 
glasses He also has many 
of the same interests as 
the students have 

Swanson was born on the 
north side of Chicago and 
has lived in the Chicago 
area most of his life He at- 
tendedNilesWest High School 
and has held a number of 
full-time jobs from his 
high school days until he en- 
tered the Harper Law En- 
forcement Program 

"My then 4uture wife. 
Chris, who was a cadet too. 
guided me around through 



my idb She has been tell- 
ing me what to do ever 
since I do not mind it though 
as I love her very much." 
stated Swanson 

Swanson stresses that his 
position as chief of the pub- 
lic safety department is not 
yet confirmed by the college 
board of trustees He has al- 
ready though started fight' 
ing crime on the campus 

"The worst campus crime 
problem we have is theft . 
The average theft on cam- 
pus is $60. but actually 
thefts range from stolen 
wallets with a few dollars 
in them to tape decks worth 
over $200 ripped out of park- 
ed cars. 

To combat this problem, 
we have a constant two -car 
patrol and a foot patrol 
for inside the buildings 
made up of cadets and part- 
time officers. 

"We also get excellent 
cooperation from the other 
college departments. espec- 
ially Buildings and Grounds 
Many of these people have 
spotted theives and given us 

(Turn to page 4) 




/ 



Paul Swanson is Harper's new acting Chief of Security. 

(Photo by Ken K4ssam) 



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Misty 



An engagement ring 
with a Coniinentat heritage: 

Light bursting 
from a band ol lace . . . 



and each leal 

in the band individually 

handpolished. 

Mit*y 

As unique as it is beautiful. 

Just in tmnt-lor happiness. 

Just in time tor love. 



Flaherty Jewelers 

2 North Dunlon 
Arlington Ht«., III. 

253-4690 



HEAR YOUR FAVORITE LOCAL BANDS 
OB WVVX 103.1 FM 

The SCerro Audio and WWX arr HponiioHnK a 
■how each Sunday niRht from 7-8 p.m. FEATURIMC 
Loral entertainerH. 

For further info chU or stop io at — 





iOWMMUr f 

1415 K. pHlMlinr Road (•! Ulndvor I>r.) 
ArltafitaM HU.. IllinoU 






THE HARBINGER 






By RICHARD KUSNIEREK 



William J. Hejnosz has 
recently been added to the 
staff at Harper College as 
the Veterans Coordinator. 
Mr. Hejnosz is a former ser- 
viceman who has beenactive 
in counseling and personnel 
worlc. both here in this coun- 
try and abroad Before com- 
ing to Harper, he was work- 
ing with children and young 
adults attached to the Vest- 
Agder County School Psy- 
chological ServicesinKrist- 
iansand. Norway Graduat- 
ing from the University of 
Oklahoma in 1969. he receiv- 
ed his BA in Psychology 
prior to entering the Army 
for two years service in the 
Pentagon. 

"All veterans in the Har- 
per College area, whether 
attending school or not. are 
urged to bring their prob- 
lems to us." said Bill, whose 
primary jj^oal is to assist 
service veterans, helping 
them with college enrollment 
and helping them to adjust to 
civilian life At this date 
there are approximately 483 
part time and 197 full time 
veterans attending Harper 
The veterans office, locat- 
ed in the college center at 
Harper College has a staff 
of three the full-time co- 
ordinator and two outreach 
workers The outreach peo- 
ple. Carl Jerls and Bob Pow- 
ers, both veterans, spend 
their time conucting. coun- 
.seling and soliciting support 
for veterans in the com 
m unity. 

The Veterans Affairs of 
flee is providing person to 
person contact with the vet 
eran Services include em 
ployment assistance through 
Harpers placement office, 
information on financial 
aids, ccwnseling. and assis- 



Oct. 1, 1973 



New V.A. coordinator 



GIRLS!!! 

NEEDED TO WORK DAYS. 

J AT >i»^ 

Mr. STEAK 



of Rolling Meadows 



n.50/hr. TIPS 

Meals 1/2 Price 
No Experience Necessory 
Apply in Person 

2765 ALGONQUIN 
(E. of HWY53) 





William HeinofU! . . . new addition to Harper. 

(Photo by Jim Moy) 

tance in finding educational phoning 397-3000 Ext 254 

and training opportunities Dally from 8:30 to 4 30 and 

Veterans may contact the on Monday and Wednesctav 

Veterans Affairs Office by evenings from 6 to 8 p m 



WIGS 

.SALKS AND SERVICK 



Closed on Mon. 




fern. 1 






FOR A I.OVt.lCI« VOO 




Kor a invlier you 
PHONK: .181-4499 



«I2 SOl'TH \nRTHUK..ST HUY. 
B,\RR|\f;TO\. tl I i\otsr.(Miio 



Sfiy "I love you" 

with more love 

than money. 




For just SM. in fact. 

Yes we have fine quality 
diamonds for $98 Andonuo 
to $3 000 You II find them in any 
oneof our stores Andyoull 
appreciate two rules every 
Hollands employee lives by 



Firtt we never high pressure We 

prefer th»t you shop slowly and 
carefully Look at only those 
diamondsthat you can afford We 
have a large selection in your price 
category Askasmanyquestionsas 
you like We II give you all the 
answers Straight 

» 
Second, since 1910our policy of 
relurnir>g your mortey if for any 

reason you re not satisfied 
So if you have the love and a little 
bit of money we have the right 
diamond for you jt 



I lollaiiiil.s Jrurk^rs 



I >' iV\ iKdvv I 



il^'N; W ,.!.,,.'' Im-'i^c ..nl"!,,/, 



' l.lk.hni.l W.M.illH 1,1 



Oct. 1, 1973 



THE HARBINGER 



Page 3 



CCCCOOUTFUTiii 



I I I 



liiiNRn; 



■ I I I I 

nil 



Editorial Comment 

The Harper Field House has been placed at the top 
of the priority list over other proposed programs under 
the master plan. Discussion is now left open as to whether 
a temporary or permanent facility should be built. 

Although both facilities will be functional, there are 
obvious obstacles lying ahead. A permanent facility com- 
pared to a temporary facility is more time consuming 
and will, because of this one factor, lose a significant 
number of student enrollment in the never ending struggle 
to "beat the budget." A temporary facility will meet the 
needs just as well, and will cost less in the long run. 

A permanent facility will talce two to three years to 
complete. If fund shartages or construction delsys occur 
it can take anywhere from 7 to 10 years to complete. 
In view of the above information Dr. Lahti describes 
the situations as "crippling and will genr-ally affect 
the quahty of education at Harper." The question is, 
can Dr. Lahti and Harper shidents afford the time 
lapse of a permanent facility over the immediate neces- 
sity of a temporary facility. 



Harper ratio questioned 



1 would lilte to comment 
on the teacher -student ratio 
at Harper College. As 1 en- 
tered last week as a fresh- 
man, I was surprised as well 
as disappointed at thesizeof 
the classes There are 30 or 
35 students in classes which, 
in my opinion, cannot be 
efficiently taught with more 
than 20. 



letters Welcome 



It is impossible for a 
teacher to perceive the 
thoughts and give accurate 
criticism on the work and 
progress of 80 or 100 stu- 
dents (figuring that he or 
she has at least three class- 
es). 

Furthermore, it is pretty 
remote to expect a teacher 
to have to write complete 
and thorough critiques of 
term papers or reports of 
such a phenomenal number 
of students The obvious end 
result: the quality of educa- 



tion goes down 

If enough people become 
aware of how the school is 
being run. 1 feel they will try 
to bring on reform and pres- 
sure the administration to 
allow funds for a sufficient 
teacher force Running the 
institution on the lowest pos - 
sible cost is a very good 
thing, however. I feel it 
should not be at the cost of 
the students' education. 

Michael Weller 
Harper Student 



l\m Croce: a simpfe ma§ 



Yes, it WAS strange 



By GREG CONWAY 



He was a simple man who 
liked to sing about ordin 
ary people; like you or me. 
Leroy and Jim Singingabout 
experiences and dreams, 
ideas and thoughts they were 
all brought together in Jim 
Croce's style of music. All 
of his songs related to life 
and contained those experi- 
ences of loneliness and love 
in which many people have 
felt within themselves as in- 
dividuals. 

After leaving Northwest- 
ern Louisana University, 



Jim Croce lost his life in a 
plane crash How Ironic! A 
man. an individual who we 
all related to so well, died 
after doing what he liked 
the most, singing his songs 
of life THAT Friday morn- 
ing not only did young peo- 
ple of today lose a friend, 
but the world once again lost 
an artist 

Croce was born and rais- 
ed in Philadelphia and spent 
a good deal of his. time on 
the waterfront where his 
father worked After he had 
graduated from Villamova 
University with a bachelor's 



degree in psychology allJim 
wanted to do was play his 
guitar and sing his songs 
After completing his ed- 
ucation during the sixties. 
Croce became a special ed- 
ucation teacher, a disc 
jockey on a soul rock sta- 
tion in Philadelphia, a na- 
tional guardsman, construc- 
tion worker, and a hospital 
orderly, while singing in cof 
fee houses and taverns 

(Turn to page 7) 



Referring to the Septem- 
ber 24 INPUT cojumn of 
STRANGE. BUT THIS IS 
TRUE. I agree that tho.se 
stop signs on the Palatine 
Road Express (Palatine and 
Arlington Hts. Rds.) are con- 
fusing to many people, but 
only because they don't know 
how to stop properly at a stop 
sign. Since I travel that route 
every day I sympathize with 
"Russian Roulette " player.s 
who come to that intersec- 
tion. 

But according to Sgt. Jack 
Weber, of the Arlington 
Heights Police Department. 




"The intersection is not haz - 
ardous. The damage is min- 
imal: no personal accidents 
but a few scraped fcMters. 
Because of the stop slgna, 
there is no speed up. They* 
're actually safer than 
lights." 

If the village wanted lights 
put in. could it be done? 
"We have no control over 
that," says Weber "The 
states does." So until that 
time, you'll have to keep 
gambling, or shout oat ol 
your window "Let the driver 
beware!" 

S. Kafader 



iVeir drinking age 



Editor-inchief Diane I>iBartelomeo 

BusineHs Manager . . . Gary Zdeb 

NewH Editor Ron Zoheris 

Features Editor . . . Rich Kusnierek 

Activities F^Kor . . . Heidi Johnson. Steve SchloKNer 

Sports Editor Phil RHtiaglia 

Cartoon Editor . . . Dennis Miller 

Photo Fxiitor L.R. Kiel 

phntographerM . . Greg Conway. Paul Cond. Ken 
KiMHam. Don Lynam. Jim Moy, 
" Chuck Zemeske 

Contributing Staff 
Mary Beth Christy. Dave Gordon. Frank McGovern. 
Sue Pollack. Ron Forep, E. K. Sinnotte. Garrik While, 
Bill Wliitehead 

Advisor - Mr. .Slurdevant 



The HAKHI\(;KK is the student publication for the 
Harper College cimpus community, published weekly 
except during holidays and mid-terms. /Ml opinions 
expressed on the editorial page or in the columns are 
those of the writer, and are not necessarily those of the 
college, its administration, faculty or student body. 

For information on advortising. rates and publica- 
tion schedule, call or write Harbinger Business 
Office 

William Rainey Harper College. Algonquin and 
Roselle Rds . Palatine. Illinois. 60067 Phone num 
her 359-4200, ext 272 and 460 



(From page |) 

be adults, but are also ex- 
pected to act in the same 
fourth of the 18 to 20- year 
olds are in college, one- third 
of them have full-time jobs, 
one-fifth are married. atKl 
more than 121, have served 
in the armed forces The 
right to buy and drink alco- 
hol seems natural enough 
when faced with the roles 
the young people are filling, 
in me words of the Michi- 
gan Commission on the Age 



HARBINGER HUSTLERS 
NEEDED 

We NEED all of the fol- 
lowing positions' 

If you crave to work on a 
newspaper or just want 
something to do with intent 
WE NEED 
Outgoing salesmen 
Pick- Up Drivers 
Secretarial Help - Filing 

and some Light Typing 
Circulation Mgr and .Staff"! 
SPORTS STAFF to assist in 
covering the play by play 
action 

If interestedpleasecontact 
us at Room A 367 - - 

Or Call 397-300aext 272 
or 460 



of Majority, "the fact is that 
the 18. 19 and 20-year-old 
has already entered an adult 
social and emp1o>rnent 
world, and he will drink if 
he wants to. whether it is 
may be. Harper students 
seem to agree that its pas 
sage is good Many are of 
the opinion that being able 
to buy the drinks will be a 
novelty at first, especially 
with the availability of res- 
taurants and loungies in the 
Harper area "We can al- 
ways watch to see how many 
18-year-olds try to getaway 
with it. '" a sophomore point- 
ed out with a grin 'They're 
going to be the only ones 
left out now" 

A shade of conservatism 
entered the scene when stu- 
dents were queries as to 
whether beer should be al- 
lowed at school activities: 
they all said no Likewise, 
was the consensus, it should 
not be served' at lunch 
through the cafeteria; most 
Students felt that this 'just 
wouldn't work " Some form 
of drunken, disruption would 
be almost guaranteed, sev- 
eral erf them said, if the 
beer could be had that eas- 
ily right on campus 

Whether or not the out- 
come of Bill 200 will be 
visible at Harper in the next , 



month remains to be seen, 
students certainly seem to he 
facing the latest development 
of their expanding adulthood 
with as much calm, humor, 
and maturity as anyone could 
ask for "All we want. " was 
one summing up. "is to re- 
ceive some of the rights of 
adults along with their res- 
ponsibilities We re just ask- 
ing the government and 
everybody else to acknow- 
ledge that most people are 
grown up these days by the 
time they re 18 or 19. that's 
all ' 

If the new drinking law is 
an indication, maybe for 
American youth the answer 
to Hamlet's question is not 
as far off or uncertain any- 
more. 



The "Harbinger " is open 
to opinions and complaints 
presented in a mature and 
business-like manner Only 
letters with names and 
addresses will be consid 
ered for this column Sig- 
natures will b.^ withheld 
on request, but signed let- 
ters will be given priority 
Letters are limited to 300 
words maximum and are 
subject to editing. 



A 



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Page 4 



THE HARBINGER 



Oct. 1, 1973 



Oct. 1. 1973 



THE HARBINGER 



Page 5 



Speech involves you 



Do you like to talk - - 
especially when no one can 
talk back? Do you like to 
travel - - to exotic places 
like Tiffin, Ohio"* Manches- 
ter. Indiana; and Muncie, Ind- 
iana? If so. then the Speech 
Team is for YOU 

There are many events 
available for you to select 
from Persuasive Speaking 
allows you to pick a con- 
troversial topic, write an 
eight to ten minute speech 
on the topic and then give 
the speech in your best form 
Extemporaneous Speaking 
requires that you keep up on 
current events. You are 
given three topics on cur- 
rent happenings, you select 
one and then have an hour 
to write and prepare your 
speech Impromptu Speech 
reqiUres that vuu be glib 



and quick wilted You draw 
three topics, si-lcrt orv' I 
then havi' si'vi-n rninul«s <«> 
prepare .ind sivt .1 sf).«'(li 
Oral Inter prelaiii:! 1 ) ■ s.- 
allows you lo ; <• • • 1 1 
ite short storj- ami perlurm 
it to bring out u;. 1 isi iiiali 
ties. Oral Inlerpn iaii« n of 
Poetry allows you to lake 
three or four poems, lie 
them together with a central 
theme, and give them to 
make a concentrated effect 
Finally. After Dinner Speak- 
ing is humorous speaking, 
based on a central theme 
It is not a string of jokes 
but rather a clever speech 
designed to make a point - - 
in a humorous way 

This year the SpeechTeam 
will travel to a number of 
new and different colleges 
and universities Heidelburg 



COME TO THE 
PARTY TONIGHT 

19's • 20's I OTHERS 

GROVE MARINA 
LIVE ROCK BAND 

NO COVER CHARGE.no MINIMUM 
WMINUTES RIGHT ON UP RT. 14 
AT STOPLIGHT IN TOWN (POX RIVER GROVE) 
TURN RIGHT 



I 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 



10/1 




GOOD FOR ONE 
FREE DRINK 9-10 PM 
GLASS OF WINE OR BEER 

((>r COCKTAIL for thoM> OVKR 21) 

GOOD ONLY ON 
10/1 




10 1 



10/1 




New ^ec, chief 



OPEN: 1 1 A.M. TO 2 A.M. 

FREE DRINKS FOR 
THE LADIES 
FROM 9-10 



♦ 
I 
I 
I 
♦ 



(From page I ) 

accurate descriptions of 
them so we can arrest the 
right person." statedSwan- 
son. 

Swanson does not drink or 
smoke, but has- nothing 
against those who do He 
in 24 years old and thinks 
America is the best coun 
try in the world. 

"Many people criticize 
the high prices here, but 
prices in other countries 
are higher This country has 
its faults, but is still the best 
nation on earth. . 

Contrary to some stu- 
dent's opinions. Acting Chief 
Swanson actually likes slu 
dents Swansonlus instruct- 
ed his men to think before 
they give out tickets or ar- 
rest 

"In this Job , you have 
got to be flexible My job 
is to protect the rights 
of all the people on this 
campus If you steal some- 
thing, we are going to ar- 
rest you. but we also want 
to know the why of ihe crime 
If you have some problems, 
we might be able to work 
something out 

"I think most of the stu- 
dents like us I believe we 
get 99% cooperation from 
the students. There are on- 
ly a very few students who 
dislike us We try to keep 
?s many people as we can 



Simon now 



College in Tiffin. Ohio, Is 
first on the schedule in mid 
October. It will be followed 
by trips to Butler Univer- 
sity in Indianapolis; Morton 
College in Cicero. The Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin in 
Whitewater; Miami Univer- 
sity in Oxford. Ohio; Ball 
State University in Muncie. 
Indiana; American Univer- 
sity in Washington. D C ; 
and the Regional Junior Col- 
lege Speech Tournament in 
Miami. Florida 

If any of the alx)ve events 
appeals lo you or you want 
to see the various colleges 
listed, see Pal Smith, lor- 
ensics Director in I' -Jril. 
before Oct. 10 



By E. K. SINNOTT 

Somehow I've really en- 
joyed Paul Simon much more 
since his separation from 
Art Garfunkel. 

On both his first and 
second albums, a late-night 
TV talk- show appearance 
and a concert at Chicago's 
Opera House Simon has been 
able to create a sense of per - 
sonableness and human 
frailty that was too often 
missing in the duo's per- 
formances. 

Of course, it could almost 
be expected that the man who 
wrote "I Am A Rock" and 
"The Boxer" would also be 
responsible for "Koda- 
chrome" and "American 
Tune". 

But who would have antici- 
pated that the other half of 
ihe duo' (Who was too busy 
making a movie to help 
out with the final touches on 
the Bridge Over Troubled 
Water album) would be able 
to record an epic disc that 
stands favorable comparison 
to any Simon & Garfunkel. 
(or Simon) work 
(hereafter I will refer to 
him by surname, only) has 
released Angel Clare. 

It includes performances 
by several capable west 
coast musicians (such as 
Larry Knechtel. JlmGordon 
and Jimmy Haskell) and the 
vocal backing of some bet- 
ter known singers like Cass 
Eliot and the St Mary's 
Choir 

The entire production is 
Handled with a delicate blend 
of professionalism and emo- 
tion 

This work is a master- 
piece, if only because it 
absolutely defies all of the 
cynicism that any Simon it 
Garfunkel fan, such as my- 



self, could offer. 

My greatest pleasure 
^came from my conclusion 
that what should have been 
the albums worse pitfalls 
have somehow become its 
highest attributes. 

Consider, for instance, the 
chorus of children who 
sitig the last verse of the 
song, "Woyaya". 

I have always despised 
children's choirs since I 
was subjected to twenty - 
three French toddlers re- 
create the entire score of 
The Sound of Music for my 
fourth -grade class in Par- 
ochial school. 

But in this song (which is 
somehow optimistic and be- 
lievable) the change in vo- 
calists seems to fit inquite 
well with the tune's meaning, 
also contributing to a sense 
of modesty on the part of 
Garfunkel himself. 

"All I Know" is the 
most realistic song at»ut 
love ever composed. 

"I bruise you 
You bruise me 
We both bruise too easily 
Too easily 
To let it show 
I love you, aixl that's all 

I know" 
"I ShaU SiAg" is a tune 
that everyone should. 

Even Andy Williams (so 
that it will be played- on 
( WYEN) 

The combination Bach- 
Fugue- Ecology lyric track 
(Feuilles-oh) has some ex- 
hilarating overdubbing by 
Garfunkel (who has, in any 
opinion). one of the most 
soothing voices in the re- 
cording industry In short, 
there isn't a weak cut on the 
disc and I sincerely believe 
that there is music here that 
will delight almost anyone. 

I give it my highest rec- 
ommendation. 



happy 

I know the drug user 
will not think this when we 
bust him or her. but I think 
we are doing that person a 
favor as all drugs are dan- 
gerous and have the poten- 
tial to kill. 



"We are here though to 
serve the student as much as 
anybody else on the campus. 
My highest priority is the 
saving of human life. I have 
a very high respect for the 
individual." concluded 

Swanson 



S TIRED OF CAFETERIA FOOD? i 

i 






TIRED OF CAFETERIA FOOD? 

JULY'S 



I 



a. 
O 

$ 
O 

z 



o 



i» jwtt minut** away' 



?ff-Jfe 



W^ 



VIENNA RED HOTS 

POLISH SAUSAGE 

ITALIAN BEEF 

CHAR-CO- BURGER 

TAMALES 

SAND\MCHES INCLUDE TRIMMINGS 

AND FRENCH FRIES 

CREAMY THICK SHAKES and MALTS 



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'^ 397^185 

847 Algonquin Rd. 

Next lo Beef N' Harrel' '" *«" Algonquin 
Schoumburg Shoppine Cenlrr 



Houn - 9 a.m. -8 p.m. Daily 
CI»M»ed NundHy<t 






HARBINGER FOLLIES 




Odfs, The 
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lOPoOurW. 
•rtd i/Ou'r« 

r MONC ^ 









MEET THE 
MADMAN 



VAN'S ARTS A CRAFTS 



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( 3 bloclit North of Algonquin oM l«« St. ) 

• 24 - St03 



COMMIRCIAL - GRAPNIC - flNI ART 

QUALITY ART SUPPLIES AT BUOCET PLEASING PRICES 




(e)\^«76 mjcSkAiiM:^ 








THE WEEK 
•IM DISTOMTION 

Old-time religion 

LONE)ON (AP)- -Shortly after police found a sheep 
wandering in north London and turned it over to the 
animal protective society, a man insisted the sheep 
was his He told reporters he belonged to a group 
that is recreating ancient Greek rituals and had 
planned to sacrifice the animal to the sun god Heliok. 

Cathedral in drive against body odm* 

LONDON (AP) - Tourists and worshipers visiting 
St Pauls Cathedral are being warned tinit the t>uild- 
ing has an embarrassing problem BODY ODOR 

Consulting engineers reported that the smell from 
3.000 visitors during peak summer periods can be 
"quite unpleasant " A new h(<ating and air-condition- 
ing system will replace the hot-water radiators in- 
stalled in 1909 

Tavern visited by town drunk 

MUNICH. Germany (UPI) Police rushed to the 
city's English Gardens after passersby reported spot- 
ting an elephant standing in front of a tavern 

It was there all right, and police said they found 
the owner inside drinking coffee 

The caretaker of the local university's animal re- 
search clinic explained he took the elephant on a 
convalescence walk, wanted a cup of coffee and tied 
up the elephant outside 

Pony imperiled by beef prices 

LITTLE ROCK. Ark (AP)- The owne/ of a New- 
port riding stable said the high cost of beef has forced 
him to consider barbecuelng a Shetland pony. 

William Stowe said the .300-pound ponies were sell- 
ing for around 3 cents a pound undressed 

'Ponies aren't too much good to me anyway. " he 
said. 

Socks go from rot to hot 

LINKOPING. Sweden (AP) - Hot socks putSOSwed 
ish soldiers on the sick list, some suffering second 
degree burns on their feet 

Authorities said a computer at the central defense 
laundry apparently mixed far too much lye or disin- 
fectant in the wash 

A warning was issued that at least 1.500 "poison- 
ous" pairs of socks may have been distributed to 
army regiments. 

It's male's turn for bias charge 

ALBANY. NY (AP)- A would-be state policeman 
has forced a postponement in the appointment of New 
York's first women troopers. 

Thomas Button. 21. an Albany patrolman who has 
received the backing of the state troopers' union, 
contends that he was "bumped" off the eligibility 
list for the state police because officials wanted to 
appoint the state's first live women troopers 

A temporary state Supreme Court restraining order 
was Issued pending a full hearing. 



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Page 6 



THE HARBINGER 



Oct. 1, 1973 



Oct. 1, 1973 



THE HARBINGER 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 



NOTICE TO: 

All Full-time students 
who have not taken one of 
the college test admis- 
sions battery required 
for Harper College and 
are on temporary accep- 
tance status: 

ACT AMERICAN 
COLLEGE TESTING 

(for transfer students) 
The next national test 
date is Saturday. Oct. 
20. Application forms 



may be picked up in the 
Admissions Office or 
Counseling Center. 
DEADLINE TO APPLY: 
October 1. 1973 TODAY 

CPP CAREER PLANNING 

PROFILE 

(for career students) 
This test will be given 
Saturday, Oct 27 Sign 
up in the Office of Test 
ing Services (A 347) 

DEADLINE TO APPLY - 

October 24. 1973 



/ 



WWWMli«M 




Caryt 

Pat Rosr 



fh* S^\T)^ 'N' Sef Baauly Solon .n 

INTERNATIONAL VILLAGE 

INTRODUCES 

Personalized Beauty Service 

by skilled Fjcperienced Beauticians 

SuscMe (manager) 

and 




Debbie 

PHttle 



OPKN SUNDAYS 
open 7 days a week 
MANICURING 



12iO ALGONQUIN KD. 
MCHAUMBURG 

call for appointment 397-0990 

- I Tn-rTf-rT-ih — " " -^-■^^^— ^^ 



l&obbv — ^ 
ITlc Occ*s 

D»«p-Pan Pizza 
Pitchers of Be«r A Win* 



704 N. River Road 
INt. Proepect. ill. 

Phone: 297-9520 




Woodfield Mall Schaumhurg, III, 

884-1170 

"PUBLIC SESSIONS 
EVERY DAY" 

" CLASS LESSONS FOR 
ALL AGES'' 




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ACROSS 

1 nkter b«Ck 
11 HlgKett point 

15 FMr of HcighU 

16 01tco»fort 

17 Ctrxwt p«rfor«»r 
(pi.) 

18 Nats. of Tteh. 

19 Part of Madding 
ctrwoAy (pi.) 

20 tonun city 
?2 Scully 

23 Mivtr: G«r. 

24 Type of soup 
26 SMMttop 
2a Nan's naiw 

30 JoNi or Jan* 

31 Nadlclnal 
substances 

33 Ont n«Md after 

•nothor 
3S Kasts 

37 lullan coin 

38 Hu9h Htfncr Imnny 
42 Hard Morkar 

46 PoatU tarn 

47 Mvtrt1s«Mnts 
(slang) 

49 Alaskan city 



SO Florida resort 

city 
S2 Play on Mords 
S^Fual 

S4 196S basaball MVP 
S7 Fmous ship 

S8 Japanese Mar 

S9 Ftendtsh 

61 OktaiMMn city 

62 Cxpcct 

63 NoslfB potentates 

64 Abstainer 

1 Aids to digestion 

2 Sourness 

3 Crosby, e.g. 

4 SMOtoda and Hunt 

5 Hake a choice 

6 If a haMer 

7 Artbur Nlller 
fwlly 

8 Spanish or 
Porluguet* 

9 U. S. MlllUry 
decoration 

10 QpWjr 

n ielatlng to beet 
12 6. i. SItav play 



13 Racognltcd 
Incorrectly 

14 CoMon suffix 
2L kill fighter 
2S Bom 

27 Eastern group of 
colleges (abbr.) 

28 -Sucb for the 

course* 

29 Leaves out 

32 Ar^ientlnc pUInt 
34 Spahn's teaHute 
36 Part of an 
Intersection 

38 te to 

39 telng oMy 

40 aeglon of Asia 
Minor 

41 Try to equal or 
surpass 

43 Sound 

44 Com forth 

45 Sec o ndhand dealer 
48 12H cents 

51 Urges 

55 Malay lav 

56 SratiHan heron 

57 Pal* drink 

58 Body Of Mt«r 
•0 Ignited 



Solution on pg. 8 



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Immediate openinic* 

Day or Kve. ahift. 

Wurli around roHene schedule 

Weekdays and/or weekends 

I.ICHT WORK 

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250 K. Hamilton Dr. 

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Phone 4.-3fMn44 



(fllasstfirds 



STUDENT HKLP WANTED 

lo ffive lour* of the campua. 

Contact Patty Schnatdar 

In the Campus Info. Office (/\228) 

In the Collece Center LounRc 

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Well groomed appearanre a mual. 



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10% Off 25% Off 

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MILLBROOK 

(GOLF MILL! 



NILES, ILL. 
967-5596 



Page 7 



Educational 
portunities 






By RON ZOBEkiS 

Students who need money 
to attend the college or uni- 
versity of their choice this 
fall have more of an oppor- 
tuiuty today than ever before 
in the history of Educational 
Aid. 

The department of Health 
Education and Welfare 
(HEW) has allocated Harper 
alone some 700.000 dol 
lars in financial aid grants 
to assist those students who 
have qualified for F'ederal 
student Financial Aid Pro- 
grams this fiscal year 

The total of $700,000 In- 
cludes $56,139 for the Col- 
lege Work Study Progttim. 
in which 100 students at 
Harper are now qualified. 
$30,000 for the Supplemen 
lal Educational Opportunity 
Grant Program where Hur 
per rww has in siuiKms. 
$40,000 plus for the Nation- 
al Direct Student Loan Pro- 
gram that now nas arrowing 
number of 4.'< students. ii2'}. ■ 
000 for the Federal Nursing 
Scholarship l>oan Program 
in which we have 21 plus 
students, aivl $82,000 for the 
Illinois State Scholarship 
where Harper has over 500. 
students qualified There is 
over $70,000 for the Law 
Enforcemetx Progrcm this 
year for the 100 students of 
Harper and $60,000 for the 
Illinois State Loan Program 
in which 100 plus students 
are participating These are 
just the major programs that 
are offered for the college 
students of today There are 
many more 

Included with the Federal 
Programs of student finan- 
cial aid there are basic 
grants such as the Guaran- 
teed Student Loan Program 
This program was estab- 
lished under the Higher Edu 
cation Act of 1965 to assist 
students with bc»iTiAvtng to 
finance part of liiuir post- 
secondary o d u c ti t I on 
Through this pioKruin a stu- 
dent may borrow uptoS2.- 
500 each academic year up to 
a maximum total of $10,000 
extending through graduate 

(Turn to page 8) 



Jm^^^^^^^^^^^^^^-m^^pu^^*^^*^^ 



fhU H99S9 

(From page 1) 

Some sizeable and relative- 
ly rapid action must be tak- 
en to salvage this program 
and this means the providing 
of facilities in keeping with 
the program's- needs. We 
have decided that ongoing 
programs have ^ higher 
priority than proposed pro- 
grams and therefore have set 
the following priority... I. 
Building M (Physical Educa- 
tion): 2. Buildings G and 
H (Vocational Education); 3. 
Buildings I and J (Vocation- 
al Education and Class- 
room), and 4. Building L 
(Vocational Education and 
Classroom). 



CALENDAR OF EVENTS 



On Campus - 

THE WHIZ KIDS. OCT. 5 at 8:00 P.M. 

"Pat Paulsen Looks at the TO's". Pat returns to Har- 
per, Oct. 2, College Center, 8:00. Free with Harper 
ID. PutUic: $1.50 adults, 75 cents students. TickeU 
available at Student Activities Office. 

' Community Chorus-Singers needed, auditions not re- 
quired. Tuesdays, 7:45-10:15 p.m. Ph. Anthony Mos- 
lardo. 437-1137 or 437-7581. 

Mini-Course, Houseplants & Terrariums. Tuesdays 
and Thursdays, 12-1:50 p.m., A-241 A & B. Ftee to 
Harper students. A representative from Frank's Nurs- 
ery in Schaumburg will instruct the class. 
Intramurals - Students interested in soccer meet on 
athletic field. Wed. & Fr., 12-12:30 p.m. Touch foot 
baU, Mon. & Wed. at 12:00 noon. 
Student Senate, Thurs., 12:30 p.m. Board room. 
Harper Players, Tues., 12:30 p.m. F-304. 

Chess Club, Tue«. & Thurs. 12:00-2:00 p.m BIdg. A. 
3rd. Floor. Game Room. 

Theatre— 
'Forty Carats by the VUlage Theatre Inc. of 

Arlington Hts. An attractive divorcee becomes involved 
with a younger man. Starring Lynn Jessen, .John 
Grayson. Bill Bailey, Paul Gary. Halita Botkin and 
Kate Clarke. Oct. 5. 6. 12 & 13, at Prospect High 
School. Ph. 259-3200 between 12 noon and 6. 
"Father's Day", comedy on divorce, starring Chita 
Rivera. .Julie Adams. Clifford David. Robert KIston. 
.Mark LeMura and Carol Ruth. Opens Oct. 11, Ivan- 
h5€. Previews Oct. 9 & 10. Ph. 248-6800 or GR 2- 
2771. 

"Brief Lives ". a play for one player, starring Roy 
Dotrloe as John Aubrey. Arlington Park Theatre. Ph. 
392-6800. 
Continuing — 

"Crease". Blackstone Theatre. Ph. ST2-2280. 
"Status Quo Vadis". Ivanhoe. Ph. 248-6800. 
"Children of the Wind". Studebaker Theatre. Ph. 
ST2-2280. 

"The Marriage-Go- Round". Pheasant Run. Ph. 584- 
1454. 
Music — 

B.B. King. Gladys Knight & The Pips. Mill Run Thea- 
tre. Oct. 4-7. Ph. 298-2170. 

Cirrus — 

Ringling Bros, and Barnrim & Bailey Circus. Chi- 
cago International Amphitheatre, Oct. 2-22. All seats 
reserved. Ph. 847-4748. 

Series Showing- 
October Feature-of-the-.Month at the Chicago Historical 
Society is "Chicago Baseball", an exhibit of photo- 
graphs taken between 1905-1919. Ph. 642-4600. 





Serving special fies of: 

Irish colle*? • 

Snrrt 'tripf a^ <f'ri fiy M'lie Ryan i 

TriKlitionHJ Vulk MiKif evrr> hiKhl rxrrpl Mon 

■MOM>AV \tC;HT FCKITBAI.I.- 

and 2.iC Bwr* A 1. 1. MKHT. 

RaKpipp Band «>n .Sunday NITK 

DRINK I 2 PRK KUITII AD 



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(^\ RnKpipc Band «>n .Sunday NITK ^^^ 

W^^ DRINK 1 2 PRK K W ITU AD ^N^ 

I^JV^ouble DRINKS - For Only SLWI'^V 
O^JV .1588444 O^ 




Pat Paulsen hdis at Harper 



Comedian Pat Paulsen will 
entertain with his satirical 
wit ia a return engagement 
at Harper College on Octo 
ber 2. 

Paulsen had lectured to a 
sellout crowd at his prev- 
ious appearance through the 
Harper College program 
series in 1969-70 

The lecture. "Pat Paul- 
son Looks at the 70s." will 
be held in the College Cen 




VSTiiz Kids 



Mm Cr»c0:« sim^k am 



(Prom page 3) 



Now that all is said and 
done I think to be a good 
judge of a person's life work, 
one must view what the per- 
son has left the world to re- 
member them by Here are 
a few ending lines from one 
of Jim Croce's last songs 

"I've got a name. 

I've got a dream 
I've got a dream 



I've got a dream 
I've got a dream 
Oh I can share it 
if you want me to. 
If you're going my way 
I'll go with you 
Moving ahead so life... 

won't pass me by. 
We've lost a good artist, 
but we are more fortunate 
than Jim. for we have his 
words of life lo aid us in 
our understandings of the 
world today. 




U /k ■ MB NEW - UNDf Tf CTAIlf NAIRPIICE 

fv *'»o- ^^»o" Mo"^ A Miliorv Wigs 

try it lr*« ^ 

COME IN TRY IT ON. and i( your re not 

overjoyad. soy no thonki and l«ove. 

We speciolize in long Hoir hoirslyling & shoping 



EXTRA INCOME 

Own your own vending route & keep all the proHts. 



CiRarettr<« 
Candy 



Cannrd Pop 
Hand«irtie<t 



Hoi Bi-veratt*-* 
Amu«ifment 



Locations already established. Profit Profile: 10 cigar- 
ette machines net SI 47.00 weekly to Vender. Only 
20% down. We finance balance. Pay from your prof 

Its. < 

Call now DANT, INC. 777-9494 



p^y WOO east Central 

H&n INDUSTRIES Arlington Heights. IH. 
ARCHITECT AND ENGINEERING 



f 



Avr)ro>ntt.M ^CIAL ART MATERIALS 

_ai 



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WE HAVE: 



259-3600 



LETRASKT 
MAGIC MARKF.RK 
CHARTPACK 



BEIKANG: 

Pad* 

Paper 

Clearprint 

Technical paper 



ter at 8 pm. Public admis- 
sion is $1.50 for adults 
and 75 cents for students 
Harper College students, 
faculty and staff are ad- 
mitted free with an ID 
card. 

Tickets are available at 
the Student Activitites Of- 
fice, (telephone 397-3000. 
extension 243 ) 





IN CONCERT HERE 
OCT. 5 



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RESEARCH 



Thousands of Topics 
$2.75 per page 
Send lor your up totet^ I60p«c« 
nuil order cjlilof ErxloM SI OO 
to cover OOTtj|e 'delivery Imc is 
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Paae 8 



THE HARBINGER 



Oct. 1, 1973 



WOMENS COACH 



Ski Club gets underway 



Miss Martha Lynn Bolt 



By PHIL BATTAGLIA 

Miss Martha Lynn Bolt. 
Asst. Professor for Wom- 
en's P.E. has been working 
for the students and staff 




MisH Bolt is Harper's Wom- 
en's Athletic Coach. 

(Photo by Jim Moy) 

of Harper College for six 
productive years, and going 
on to complete her seventh. 
Miss Bolt graduated from 
Eastern Illinois in 1962 with 
a BA in P.E. She receiv- 
ed her Masters in 1967. 
While working on her mas- 
ters, she taught in High 
School District 214. From 
'62- '64 she taught basic P.E. 
at Arlington High School. 
In '64 she went to Wheeling 
High School, accepting the 
job of lead teacher in P.E. 
forming the new womens' 
programs now offered there. 
She continued there until 
'66 where she went to Elk 
Grove High School to car- 
ry out the same thing as she 
did for Wheeling. In 1967 



Miss Bolt arrived at Har- 
per, and began working im- 
mediately with the staff 
and administration setting up 
our Womens' P.E. program 
here and has been working 
on it ever since. 

Miss Bolt's programs at 
the present consists of gym- 
nastics and tennis. Because 
of the present conditions of 
our field house it is hard for 
her to pursue many of the 
other programs (rffered 
which she would like to do. 

Future plans for Miss Bolt 
are to be able to teach more 
of the Indoor sports in the 
program to students and al- 
so to widen the program. 

Miss Bolt, while being the 
only woman coach here at 
Harper has had a few as- 
sistants in the past, but 
this year she is alone We 
congratulate Martha Bolt 
on her fine job she had done 
here at Harper and wish her 
the b^t of luck in the future. 



A meeting was held on 
Sept. 25 for the Ski Club. 
There was a turn out of 
about 70 students consist- 
ing of beginners all the way 
up to experts. 



During this meeting things 
were explained, as to how 
the club was going to be run 
and what it was going to in- 
volve. 

There will also be a new 




Miss Bolt tumpH Pro. 
(Photo by Jim Moy) 



Harper wins again! 




Harper Hawks kickoff. 



By FRANK McGOVERN 

Saturday , September 22. 
the Harper Hawks played 
Kenned>-King in a game 
where in the first quarter 
the Hawks were losing 
12 to But the^ Hawks 
made a fantastic comeback 
to beat King 27-18 

Eriv Kimb nought who was 
offense olayer of the week. 



(Photo by Chuck Zemeske) 

made 6 passes for 116 yards 
and 2 touchdowns. The most 
yardage of any player in 
one game in the history of 
Harper College football 
Terry Courrie, who was the 
leading defensive tackle, 
was player of the week. 

Coach Eliasil's team 
plays Iowa Central Septem- 
ber 29. Iowa Central is the 
#1 team in the country. 



L 




Ski Club officers 
Tadge. 



V.P. Kathy Diduch and Pres. Yvonne 
(Photo by Ken Kissam) 



meeting place for the club 
in D-231 every Tuesday from 
12:15 p.m. til 2:00 p.m. 

So if you missed the first, 
be sure to make the second, 
for an interesting movie on 
"Skiing Country U.S.A.." 
and a lot of fun. 

Tentative trip schedules 
will be: Thanksgiving, Arf- 
ton Alps. Minn.; Christmas. 
Squaw Valley. Calif.; Semes- 
ter Break, Steamboat Srings. 
Colo; February. President's 
Day. Indianhead. Mich. 

Other weekend trips to 
be scheduled: Devilshead. 
Wis ; Boyne Mt and High- 
lands, Mich and Mt Tele- 
mark. Wis: 




THF mW CHEEUiADIMG TtAHH 




'73-'74 Hawk Cheerleading Squad (from left to rt.) boHom row, Laura 
Cummings, Minday Lou Boles. Donna Skoglund. Top: Kathy Myzia, 

Sue Hanson. Karen Romano 
(captain), Mary Helen 
Slingerland, and Mary 
Truty. 
(Photo by Donn Lynam) 




M. 0^ 



Harph«'s F'NCst W ^ V£w ficcet. %C P"0».«*ir 



Before you buy 

Auto Insurance 
C-" 495-0648 

• 20% Savings for faculty 

* Driver training credit 

* Good student discount 

* Financiol Responsibility 

* Motorcycles all CC's 



Bradley/Bradley Agency Insurance Inc. 



(From page B) 

school The US Office of 
Education estimates that 
since 1965 more than three 
million students attending 
more than 69.000 eligible 
institutions have benefited 
from these loarvs Other 
grants not mentioned are the 
veterans benefits (GI Bill), 
also Social Security benefits 
and Illinois State Scholar- 
ship Commission program. 
Illinois State Monetary A- 
wards. and the bilingual 
scholarships grant program 
The first step toward get- 
ting a grant is filling out 
an application for determin- 
ation of i-xpected family con- 
tribution which may be ob- 
tained at the congressman s 
district office 108 North 
Main Siie<<i \N'i. iton Also 
his tfUithince Olli-c Stu- 
dent rinanci.il Ani ofliri" al 
a college, post office and 
state empI'Aiii' i i 



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H/KBINGER 



William Rainey Harper College, Algonquin and Roselle Roads, Palatine, Illinois 60067, 312-397-3000 



Vol. 7, No. 4 



October 9. 1973 



CANDIDATES VOICE OPINIONS 



Student Senate elections 
will be held tomorrow. The 
following are the reasons 
why some of your fellow stu- 
dents are Senate canditates 
and why you should vote . . 

"I would 11 k.e to be a Sen- 
ator because 1 feel that I am 
well qualified and concerned 
I am taking psychology, 
sociology' and speech and feel 
these things can be applied 
by me as a Senator I am 
against all forms o( pre- 
judice and am an active fem- 
inist I hope that by being a 
Senator I can advance the 
cause of humanity one small 
step. Win or lose. I will 
always listento you. the stu- 
dent " are Lee Sloan's rea- 
sons for running for Senate. 

Joyce Bruzzini is running 
for Senate because she wants 
to help improve Harper 

"I would like to share with 
others and have others share 
with me the* idea by which 
Harper can be i nip roved I 
want to be an integral part 
of this college I want to 
represent the student body at 
Harper That is my main 
reason for running for Stud- 
ent Senate." explained Miss 
Bruzzini 

Sucey B Bueschel wants 
to do his best to contribute 
to his fellow students by 
being a Senator. 

i would like to become a 
member of the Student Senate 
in an effort to study a stud- 
ent government inrelationto 
our national government, but 
my prime interest goes be- 



yond the fundamental struc 
tures. I intend to do 
best to contribute to my f^l 
low students. 

In my previous yea^ at 
Hillsdale College in Michi- 
gan. I was active in several 
student groups including the 
governmental Student Fed- 
eration With this past ex- 
perience. I think 1 can help 
introduce more student par- 
ticipation within this college 

James F Fink sees a 
growing need for involve- 
ment by the students in col- 
lege governmental affairs. 

•'For the last two years, I 
have observed the growing 
need for student involvement 
in theaffairs of government 
Here at Harper this is espec - 
ially evident In those same 
laA two years. I have been 
drawn toward more ex- 
tensive involvement in pro- 
grams beneficial to student 
interests and welfare," ex- 
plained Fink. 

David M Franson thinks 
sincere involvement in stu- 
dent affairs is very import- 
ant to the students 

"I want to get involved 
with the college and its 
activities I want to hear the 
students and their thoughts 
and to help represent them 
and their college I feel 
sincere involvement In pro- 
grams beneficial to stu- 
dents 

"I want to get involved 
with the college and its act- 
ivities. 1 want to hear the 



Student rep. on board 



A new Illinois law (House 
Bill 1628) provides for non- 
voting student represen- 
tation on all of the boards 
governing higher education 
including two-year com- 
munity colleges and four- 
year institutions 

The new law. recently 
signed by Governor Walker, 
became effective on October 
1. 1973 The community 
college section of the law 
stipulates that each college s 
board of trustees shall have 
one non-voting member who 
is a student enrolled in the 
college under the jurisdic- 
tion of the board. 

The method of selection 
of the student to the local 
board is presently being 
clarified by college officials 
in order to insure com- 



pliance with the law. An 
initial opinion offered by the 
Illinois Community College 
Trustee Association in- 
structed the college board's 
secretary to conduct a re- 
ferendum in which the stu- 
dents decide how to select 
a representative This would 
be followed by an election, 
if necessary, to choose the 
student who would serve on 
the board 

It is thought that the stu 
dent will be either elected 
at large by the student body 
or appointed by the Student 
Senate. Plans are being 
formulated to have the se- 
lection process completed by 
the end of October The term 
of trffice is for one year 
beginning on July 1 of each 
year. 



students and their thoughts 
and to help represent them 
and their college I feel 
sincere involvement is 
important for all students." 
emphasized Franson 

David Hanneman feels his 
past political experiences 
qualify him as a good Sen- 
ator. 

"I feel that I am qualif- 
ied to handle the job because 
in high school I had one year 
in student government, am 
active in the Republican Or- 
ganization of Schaumburg 
Township (ROOST) and was 
appointed to the Youth Com- 
mission of Schaumburg and 
Elk Grove Township. " re- 



lated Hanneman. 

Doug Janis wants to ac- 
complish things that deserve 
attention and that might not 
get done without him 

■ 'I want to be a part of the 
student government and to 
have a vote in what goes on., 
I want to get involved and 
accomplish things that de- 
serve attention and which 
otherwise may never be 
done" 

Meda Johnson believes in- 
volvement and caring are the 
only ways to get things done 
She is showing she' is caring 
by becoming a Student Senat- 
or 

"People have told me 



many things about Harper 
before I came here. They 
told me I would not meet 
anybody and that this college 
was one big high school. I 
think if you get involved in 
things you can not help but 
get involvedand meet others. 
If Harper is like a high 
school. I think that Student 
Senate can change this I 
want to run because I believe 
involvement and caring are 
the only ways to get things 
done, ' explained Miss John- 
son 

Jackie Kroplopp wants to 
get involved too but she wants 

(Turn to Pace X) 



Temporary structure foreseen 




Inltriiir view «»f 4.'>.0<MI i*q. ft. track fadlity showing well lighted Interior. 



By DIANE DIBARTOLOMEO 

The first of many stra- 
tegic steps have been taken 
on by The Harper Adminis 
tration Approval for placing 
Phy Ed building M of the 
master plan at the top of 
the priority list, has been 
finalized as of* Tuesday 
nights meeting of Harper 
with The Junior College 
Board 

Build mg M does not stand 
by itself at the top of the 
oriority list Vocational 
buildings G and Hare sharing 
the position along with build- 
ing M, in what has been 
phrased as a package deal 
With this adoption, the goal 
for the completion of Har- 
pers Master Plan will be 
achieved at a faster rate 

More steps have yet to be 
imprinted in a redlapedlrail 
which lies ahead A second 



appro\'al is needed by The 
Board of Higher Education 
and then onto The Illinois 
Legislature to approve the 
funding of the project From 
then on the fate of Harper 
acquiring a permanent field 
house is up to Gov Walker, 
who can either pass the bill 
or do an instant replay of 
bill SB 1199 With cons- 
truction delays and a red 
tape trail lying ahead, a 
completion date is estimated 
at 3 years minimum. 

In view of the above, it 
is quite evidertt some type 
of a temporary facility will 
be needed The Phy "Ed 
Dept is now looking into the 
possibilities of acquiring a 
temporary facility and have 
come up with the following 
alternatives ... An infla- 
tible air structure has been 
introduced as both econo- 
mical and functional The 
cost is estimated at $40 



thousand for an activity area 
of 1400 sq ft alone- -without 
the support structures The 
second alternative is a sys- 
tem type metal building, with 
a price estimated at $350 
thousand This structure 
will take less than a year to 
complete The one disad- 
vantage being, it has a bad 
reputation of the destruction 
of campus master plans 
Since its life expectancy is 
permenant. but si9)posedly 
considered temporary, a 
college will end up substi- 
tuting its structure for the 
real thing, as seen at The 
College of Dupage 

The quality of both facili- 
ties are equal., but better 
than the quality of the old 
field house. 

Although they are tempo- 
rary it should not be confusedf 
that they will completely re- 
place the higher quality of 
the permanent structure. 



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Page 2 



HARBINGER 



Candidates speak out 

(Cont from Page 1) 

to also see what the world 
is abou through the Senate 

"I would nice to run be- 
cause I like being involved 
and watching things happen. 
Not everyone wants to get 
involved and they should not, 
but I did I won't stand 
here and condemn those who 



October 9, 1973 



do not want to be involved. 
I do not want to redeem th« 
world but just to see what it 
is about High School Stu- 
dent Council opened up a dif- 
ferent world of friends, re- 
sponsibilities and exper- 
iences for me and I want 
to recreate the experience. " 



Greg "TSCrosse says his 
past qualifies him to be a 
good Student Senator and he 
wants to share his ex- 
perience with the rest of the 
student body. 

"I worked for Senate in- 
directly several years ago. 
I am a candidate for Presi- 
dent of KononiaClub.member 
and former member of the 
counselor committee. ' ' 



Rick Mclntyre wants to 
communicate with the stu- 
dents, kill rampant cor- 
ruption in the Senate and 
cause things to happen at 

"How much do you really 
know about Harper's Student 
Senate? What has the Sen- 
ate achieved? You probably 
do not know the answers and 
that is why 1 am running. 
Secondly, I can not accept 



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the current practice of tui- 
tion rebate liere for select- 
ed members of the Senate. 
I believe this practice has 
no valid fq-ounds. And 
third, I want to make things 
happen here nite the new 
fieldhouse that we desper- 
ately need." 

James Richter wants to be 
a politically involved citizen 
and enjoys serving others 

"Since I am Interested in 
politics as a possible career 
and being a member of the 
Senate is a logical step in 
that direction. I chose 
to run." 

Steve Bowman wants to be 
a part of the great things 
that Senate can causetohap- 
" pen with his help 

"I am interested in help- 
ing out in the Senate and I 
want to serve with the hope 
that Harper's Senate can 
achieve great things I 
want to be a part of it " 
Carole Schuh has always 
been interested in school 
government "In juniorhigh 
I was student council pre- 
sident. I never ran for any 
part in high school be- 
cause we moved too much 
A Scott Rieger 
In the wisdom of God the 
world through Its wisdom did 
not come to know God. God 
was well pleased through the 
foolishness of the message 
preached to save those who 
believe For indeed Jews 
ask for signs, and Greeks 
search for wisdom, but we 
preach Christ cnictfied. 
to Jews a stumbling block, 
and to gentiles foolishness, 
bui to those who are the 
called. both Jews and 
Greeks. Christ the power of 
God and the wisdom of God 
Being reconciled through 
the gift of repentance and 
of faith from God and to- 
ward God. I am convicted 
that man needs to know be- 
fore he can be properly re- 
presented 

Jeanne Rodseth - Id like 
to help students at Harper 
by getting involved with the 
Senate Student government 
gives me a chance to make 
Harper College a better 
place 

San Sa pie ha - Student Sen 
ate has been an ambition 
of mine for many years 
Here af Harper I have the 
time and opportunity to see 
this goal accomplished Dur- 
ing the time when I attended 
New Trier East High School 
in Winnetka and Maine Town- 
ship West in Des Plaines, 
I was involved in various 
student activities Among 
these were track, gymnas- 
tics, entertainment (social 
activities) and a committee 
to re- evaluate the school 
paper. I have attended Nor- 
thern Illinois University for 
one year, where I worked 
with their newspaper staff 
as a photographer. Thruout 
high school and college I 
have minored in history 
and political science, which 
are of great interest to me 
and the enthusiasm I have 
of becoming a senator at 
Harper can only be beneficial 
to the organization 



Oct. 9, 1973 



ouTPur- 



The people of this country cannot affor<l to be tired 
of Watergate. 

The popular phrase these days seems to be "wal- 
lowing in Watergate". It apped^ that the Watergate is- 
sue is quickly becoming a dead one. Even the networks 
voted by a two to one majority (C.B.S. opposed) to 
stop covering the Senate hearings. Many senators return- 
ing home during the August recess came back to Wash- 
ington saying the public was tired of Watergate and 
wanted to move on to more important issues. If this is 
Indeed the true trend in the country then, we the editors 
feel it is our job to help strike up the fire under the Wa- 
tergate kettle until all the complete story is known. 

Also recently Vice President Spiro Agnew has been 
under attack for allegedly receiving kickbacks while 
governorof Maryland. It appears that information has 
been leaked from high scores regarding the Investigation. 
We believe that. If the Vice President Is guilty he should 
be conironted with the evidence. The business of leaking 
information to draw attention away from the lYesident 
himself and Watergate Is an extremely dangerous game 
to play with our court system. 

A democracy functions properly only when It is con- 
stantly checked, and if problems found, are corrected. 
If that system fails, then the democracy is doomed to 
fall to serve the people It Ib governing. But, the checks 
cannot come only from within the governing structure, 
but also conr>e from the governed. If the people tin of 
Watergate, the system has failed and the democracy will 
certainly fall. 



Placement 
Aids 



and Financial 



Are you graduating in 
January? Are you gradua- 
ting in June? Coming to 
campus October 17. 19. 23. 



and 24. twenty four com 
panics and industries inter 
viewing prospective emplo- 
yees and giving out informa - 
tlon on their company. For 
more information, please 
contact the Placement Office 
NOW 



# "H/RHNGER 



r 



t^ditor-in-chief 
Managing Editor 
Business Manager 
News Editor 
Features Editor 
Activities Editor 
Sports Editor 
Cartoon Editor 
rhoto Editor 
Photographers: 




Diane DiBartoiomeo 

Donn L-ynam 

Gary Zdeb 

Ronald Porep 

Ron Zoberis 

Heidi Johnson 

Phil Battaglia 

Dennis Murray 

L. H. Kiel 

Greg Conway, Paul Cord, Ken 

Kissam, Jim Moy, Mike Wellman 

and Chuck Zemeske 



Contributing Staff 
Mary Beth Christy. Dave (Gordon, Frank McGovern, Sue 
Pollack, Steve Schlosser, E. K. Slnnott, Garrik White, Bill 
Whitehead 

Advisor - Mr. Sturdevant 



THE HARBINGER 



Pao« 3 




p^iesident in dwihne&A. 



-i-.-iiii^j «.- 



"Nothing is here for 
tears, nothing to 
wail or knock the 
breast, no weakness, 
no contmept, dis- 
praise or blame; No- 
thing but well and fair, 
and what may calm us 
in death os ngble " 
Milton 



I 



The HARBINGER is the student publication for the 
Harper College campus community, published weekly 
except during holidays and mid-terms. All opinions ex- 
pressed on the editorial page or in the columiis are 
those of the writer, and are not necessarily those of the 
college, its administration, faculty ck student body. 

For Information on advertising, rates and publica- 
tion schedule, call or write Harbinger Business Of- 
fice. 

William Rainey Harper College, Algonquin and 
Roselle Rds., Palatine, Illinois 60067. Phone num- 
ber 397-3000, ext. 272 and 460. 



Beneath a settled ground 
lay an unsettled grave. A 
tormented President A 
peaceful martyr He lies 
in darkness; the same dark- 
ness of ignorance and pov- 
erty, he ought to bring his 
Nation out oi Into the bright- 
ness of the Sun 

He was a man |x>ssesed of 
love; love of people, idess, 
love of thoughts, truth, and 
freedom He lived his life 
bringing these dreams to 
fruition He died his last 
moments watching them torn 
apart 

He sought to rid his nation 
of Imperialism Imperial- 
ism sought to rid his nation 
of him 

Drowning in the tears of 
despair his nation weeps the 
sorrow of its age Move- 
ments across an empty 
street The broken ashes of 
dead thinkers fall withinair 
Shadows and shades are 
pulled on windows; to minds 
Doors are shut no steadier 
than ears to the terror of 
the streets Night Is no 
blinder than this nations eyes 
to the slavery of a race 
Thousands still remain 
political prisoners in the 
circus areanas of the new 
Emperors Hundreds more 
are yet in refuge Dozens 
die each day in their homes, 
universities, and factories 
fighting Facism Facism 
brought to their once Demo- 
cratic country by the Ameri- 
can CIA. and the White 
House Gestapo 

This government bears no 
more of a scar on its con- 
science for the responsibi 
Ilty of Allendes death than 
it did for the brutal Mael- 
stom unleashed against the 
Vietmanese People A peo- 
ple who also sought to rid 
their nation of Imperialism 
It bears no scar because 
It has no conscience The 
White House lieutenants 
wear jack -boots on their 
minds to protect them from 
the reality of Time and 
Space; the reality that ail 
things are ever changing, 
nothing is constant, that 
there is no Absolute when 
perceived Abstractly in 
truth. Not even the almighty 
will of a government, or a 
particuliar President This 
they should keep we 1 1 in mind. 
Another oi the famous 
White House memos has been 
released by a leak in the 
State Dept , naturally denied 
by that very same White 
House. It reads as follows: 
April 17. 1970 
Atten : ITT Brd Chm 



Oper. ^"Chrysan- 
themums" 
Allende must be stopped at 
all cost. His plans to na- 
tionalize Chiles Industries 
will be the first step in 
breaking our economic hold 
on South America. Buy Al- 
lende off If possible Set 
up a puppet dictatorship 
under our dome, be sure 
their on our team If indeed. 
Allende will not cooperate, 
there will be no choice but 
to bury him. We will leave 
particulars in your capable 
hands. Destroy after as- 
similation. 

Yours truly. 
CC db 

Charles Colson 
Deceit and lies pervade 
our Government Thieves 
and murderers pace the Oval 
Room of the White House 
These are the kind of po- 
licies and men that runour 
Nation Salvaoore Allende 



and Robert F. Kennedy are- 
the kind of men they kill. 
In the darkened hours of 
of a mornings past lie the 
Worlds future truths En- 
compassed and held as 
dearly you would think to 
hold Powers rise and fall 
with each passing of the 
guard, yet we see it as clear- 
ly as they did then. Cold 
and warm within Life and 
death, war and peace, love 
and hate are' all Intwlned to 
each. In time. In space. 
In the perception of a thought 
that transcends mere citizen 
and State In the (k^am. 
then this too, is at opqosite. 
From the throws ol tyranny 
and dictatorship comes the 
form Utopia 

The wind is in from Africa, 
and it is Tuesday afternoon. 

We are outlaws free and 
high . 

Hail to the birth of an idea. 




As a Chilean citizen it's 
of a meaningful importance 
to denote and to refute 
abysmally about an article 
appeared in the Harbinger 
of September 24th. 73 titled 
Mourning of the Sun ' 

It is noticeable that the 
redactor of that article has 
absolutely no idea of what he 
is dealing with, neither has 
he been in Chile lately so 
that he could have giv^i a 
proper opinion about the 
matter. 

Thus. It's necessary to 
refute h i s erroneous 
thoughts and give a thorough 
informative overview. 

Since Allendes 1970 pres- 
idential election, the country 
was involved in a continu- 
ous commotion of illeg,il ac- 
tions and facts, such as 
illegal take over of farms, 
industries and the clandes- 
tine smuggling of soviet- 
made weapons. The econ- 
omical chaos brought hun- 
ger to the people whoevery- 
day had to line up In a 3 



block long row or more to 
get a pound of sugar, flour 
or salt Do you think tills is 
freedom? 

What about being fired 
from your job be<^use you 
don't agree with the govern- 
ment's political ideas 

That's the dogma Allende 
tried to impose to the Chil- 
eans bu we fought because 
we could no longer resist 
being oppressed by the 
marxist doctrine Unfor- 
tunately innocent people got 
killed trying to defend a 
government that cheated 
them with wrong hopes and 
false promises that never 
arose 

Nevertheless, it has been 
hopefully just ahundredpeo- 
pie killed instead of a Civil 
War. which would have killed 
millions of human lives In 
Chile right now Liberty and 
Peace is just starting to 
reign and people will be 
able to live with dignity and 
freedom again. 

Juan Carlos Nunez 




/ 



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THE HARBINGER 



Oct. 9. 1973 





"When I look back on all 
the crap I learned in high 
•chool. . . " 

The words of Paul Simon 
may upset many people, but 
the unfortunate truth of the 
matter iB that "Grammar 
School" should be added to 
the quoted phrase; "Gram- 
mar School" and to some 
extent "college". 

Our entire system of mass 
education, from stage one all 
the way up to the university 
level is in trouble. It is in 
trouble because our educa- 
tors are reluctant to admit 
that In today's society the 
Idea of mass education as 
it has existed for the past 
75 years or so is painfuUy 
inadequate in preparing 
young people for their place 
in the Ule^tyk of todays 
world. 

Too much emphasis is 
plaqad on college and edu- 
cation in college. Too much 
emphasis Is placed on grades 
and grade point averages. 
The purpose of education is 
too often lost t>ecause of a 
mythical sense of responslb- 
Uity on the "college is your 
key to success" thought. And 
of course, you must get A's 
and B's or else no one will 
want you, degree or no de- 
gree. 

The pressures on students 
sometimes become more of 
a detriment than a help. 
There seems to be some great 
belief that the more you push 
students to teach themselves 
the better they will learn, 
and of course, this is true- 
•ometlmes. The problem 
arises here when you are 
dealing with a person who Is 
not an outstanding scholar, 
some one who is not a natur- 
al go-getter, some one whose 
intelligence far out-weights 
his motivation. 

What our educational In- 
stitutions must do is simple. 
We must get away from a 
regurgitation type of learn- 
ing. 

Where the major change 
must take place is In the 
method of education. Ameri- 
can education must become 
personalized. No longer can 
"reading, writing and 'rlth- 
metic" be taught by aftand- 
•rdiied program. 

Each individual is differ- 
ent. His interests rest in dif- 
ferent areas. It istherespon- 
slMUty of the educator to 
determine where the stu- 
dent's interests and talents 
He and then develop these 
interests and talents. 



Goprf ^mts on a bad night 



The on 

authentic 

Gaelic Pub 

in the 

Suburbsl 

Serving spccJa/f»«s o^* 

Irish coMe* - ^ ,,. .• ^ 

Sam* rtcip* oj u»*d by Mik« Ryon at m« Shonnon Airpoft 

TrMdlttonal Folk Mu»k every nlghl cxrepi Mo. 

"MONDAY NIGHT KOOIBALL" 

and 25C Bttn ALL NIGHT. 

BaKpipe Band on Sunday NITE 

DRINK 1/2 PRICK WITH AD 




By E K SINNOTT 

The Program board finally 
came through for us last 
week. They contracted an 
up- and- coming country- 
rock band named Wlldflower 
to play a concert- dance In 
the lounge 

Wlldflower has an extre- 
mely strong reputation in the 
Chicago area They are 

consuntly in demand at the 
better Chicago ckibs and at 
Dex Card's Wild Goose In 
VMteeling 

One night at the Aragon 
Ballroom Wlldflower hadthe 
audience dancing in the 
aisles while the Byrds (who 
were the headllners) re- 
ceived only polite applause 
Last Friday was no ex- 
ception The weather was 
horrible Pacific Stereo was 
drawing huge crowds for 
their own show down the 
street Wlldflower's roadies 
were late (very late) And 
yet the whole set came off 
with a really smooth feel- 
ing The group's playing 
was unusuallv tight_ 

John Hums, their lead 



guiurist is among the moat 
proficient in the area. His 
work holds up well to that 
of any other rock guitarist 
I know of The pedal steel 
playing of Stoney Phillips 
was excellent in that it was 
timed almost precisely to fill 
in gaps in the lead work 
The rhythym guitar and 
dnims were given capable 
backif). making the groups 
overall sound evenly ba 
lanced However once the 
sound passed ihroOgh the 
speajs^^ It suffered more 
than the usual distortion and 
feedback for which Harpers 
student lounge Is becoming 
legendary This can only be 
attributed to the group's 
sound crew who seemed to 
feel that the best way to han- 
dle a live' hall is to in- 
cr«»8e the sound levels, 
which is. sadly, untrue 

One note Sean Ryan's 
coffeehouse on Tuesday was 
very well done The per- 
former timed and spacedhls 
music well If you like 
folk music, the coffeehouses 
are usually quite ei\joyabla. 




WILDFLOWER photo by L.R. Kiel 



«%, 



double DRINKS - For Only fl.W 






^^ 3SS-8444 ^ 

^•fibth\Me» 

GILENQ4^ 
OFEl/ENTS 

On Campus- ^.«^ 

"Catch 22" presented Oct. 12, 8:00 p.m.. E106 
Mini-Course, Moog Synthesizer. An introduction to the 

Moog. an electrical Instrument capable of reproducing 

practically any sound. Limited enrollment. Tues.. 

12:30-2:00. Oct. 9& 16, A147. 
Student Senate Mtg. Thurs., 12:30, A241-A & B 
Harper Players, Tues., 12:30. F304 
Seekers. Thurs.. 12:00-1:30. D227 
Ski Club. Tues.. 12:15.0231 
Chess Cltab. Tues. & Thurs.. 12:00-2:00. 3rd floor. 

Game Room. 

Theatre-; 

"The Night They Shot Harry Llndsey With A 155mm 
Howitzer And Blamed It (hi Zebras", a political 
farce by Richard J. Cusack on man's proclivities for 
destruction, starring Mlna Kolb. Premieres Oct. 18 
at The Body Politic. 2259 N. Lincoln Ave. Previews 
Oct. 11-13. Ph. 477-1977. 

The Skin of our Teeth", Thornton Wllders spoof 
on mankind's Industructlbillty through the ages, 
starring Sarah Miles as Sablna. Previews on Oct. 

1 1 at 8:00. Opens Oct. 12 at 8:00. Arlington Parl^ 
Theatre. Ph. 392-6800. 

•Freedom of the City", about the conflict In N. 
Ireland. StarU Oct 9, Goodman Theatre. Ph. 236- 
2337. 
'Forty Carats", an attractive divorcee becomes In- 
volved with a younger man. Presented by the Vil- 
lage Theatre Inc. of Arlington Hts. at Prospect 
High School, Oct. 12 & 13. Ph. 259-3200 between 

12 noon and 6. 

"Father's Day", comedy on divorce, starring Chita 
Rivera. Julie Adams, CllfforJl David, Robert Elston. 
Mark LaMura and Carol Ruth. Opens Oct. 11, 
Ivanhoe. Previews Oct. 9 & 10. Ph. 248-6800 

Music- ,n a nn 

The Four Seasons, Arle Crown Theatre, Oct. 12, 8:30 

Ph. 791-6000. 
Bette Midler, Auditorium Theatre, Oct. 12, 13 at 8:30 

and Oct. 14 at 7:30. Ph. 922-2110. 

Sandler & Young and Lonnie Shorr. Oct. 12-21, MllJ 
RunTheatre. Ph. 298-2170., 

Blood, Sweat, and Tears. Clct. 13. 8:00, C^lseman 
Memorial Auiditorlum. Concordia Teacher's CoUege, 
740a Augustrf) River Forest. Ph. 771-830O. ext. 243. 

The Lettermen. Arle Crown Theatre, Oct. 13, 8:30. 
Ph. 922-2110. 

Gospel Program, presented by LeRoy Jenkins Evangel- 
istic Assoc. Auditorium Theatre, Oct. 15, 7:00. Ph. 
922-2110. 



t 



N 



Oct. 9, 1973 



Dial a Sei'reiary 
893-3332 
Win typ« reports, thesis, resume, etc. 
Special student rates. 

'72 Cadet 

3-speed noor shift 
35 cu. p/8& radio 
Steave 359-8392 

Enclosed Vet Tractor 

4'x8' 

Studio couch, green or gold cover 

1 dresser (Sdrawer) & 

brown lay bacic chair & 

1 man's bike 26" & 

1 girl's bilce 24" 

1 girl's bike 16" 

1 trlke 

894-4970 

House to Clean 

Thursdays or Friday 
0«-n Transportation 
381-4731 

StHdent Help Needed 

Students Tteeded to give lours of the 
campus to area high school stu- 
dents and local community groups. 
If you have some free time in k)e- 
tween classes and would like tueam 
sum* money on campus, contact 
Patty Schneider In the Campus In- 
formation tmce (A228) in the Col- 
lege Center Lounge on the second 
floor of BiUkilng "A". 
Well groomed appearance a must. 



RESEARCH 



Thousands of Topics 
S2 75 per paga 

Send tof your up to dste. IGO^afr 
mail order cOdoc Enclose SI 00 
to cover ix»li|c idclirtfy tioK it 
I to 2 days) 

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11941 WIISHIREBIVD SUITE «? 

LOS ANGELES. CAIIF 9002S 

0131 477 8474 or 477 5493 

Ow >>%»»f(X ««it'i<i tt tsM tar 
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THE HARBINGER 



P»Q0 5 



Help Wanted 

Full or Fart time 

Immediate openings 

Day or eve. shift i 

Work around college schedule 

Weekdays and/ or weekends 

LIGHT WORK 

Call or apply: 

250 K. Hamilton Dr. 

/Vrlington Hts., lU. 

Phone: 439-4044 

Wanted - 

Male or female for 
NKW ROCK GROUP 
Northwest suburb area 
Organ/ Keyboards and BaM 
You don't have to t>e super 
Just t>e interested. Serious? 
CaU Al: 392-1409 

Help Wanted 
Teacher Helper 
Industrial Arts 
..At Friendship Junior High, 
Des Plaines. Hr.: 11 a.m. -3 p.m. 
>2.19perhr. 
437 1000 Mrs. Jeffers 

For Sale 

1970 Dodge Dart "340 • 

Orange w/ black top 

Hungel-Hee strip 

Headers and more 

$1550. 

Randy. 2.'i9-259fl afl. 6 p.m. 

8lereo Component* 

All major brands 

AU new. AH 100 guaranteed. 

20'~-40". off Fair Trade list price. 

CaU: Mr. Faftcr: 358^7 II 



rif C9lh§ N«f St 

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fhe Swing 'N' Set B«auty Soion 
INTERNATIONAL VILLAGE 

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INTRODUCES 

Personalized Beauty Service 
by skilled Experienced Beauticians 
SuMtte (manager) 
and 




Debhif 
Pattie 



OPEN SUNDAYS 

open 7 days a week 
MA NICURING 



12iO ALGONQUIN Rl). 
HCHAUMBURG 

call for appoinlmcnt 397-0990 



202 S. Cook St 



Barrington 



DARKENS 



FOR, 



NON RESIDENT WiSC. HUNTING IIC. IN STOCK 



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De«p-Pan Pixza 
Pitchers of Beer A Wine 

704 N. River RomJ 
Mt. Prospect. III. 

Phone: 297-9520 




HEAR YOUR FAVORITE LOCAL BANDS 
on WVVX 103.1 FM 

The Stereo Studio and WVVX are sponsoring a 
show each Sunday night from 7-8 p.m. FEATURING 
Local entertainers. 

For further info call or stop in at — 

Jereo 

'»o« (ouNO leut- 
1415 E. PalHline Road (al Windsor Dr.) 
Arlington Htn., Illinoln 




398-1510 



WIGS 

SALES AND SERVICE 



Closed on Mon. 







ens X 
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FOR A UOVUIIR VOU 




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PHONE: .381-4499 



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What you 

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about diamonds: 




S»>«INC 



Color 

Diamonds that are abso- 
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are valued accordingly 
A colorless diamond, 
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Every ArtCarved Dia- 
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JEWELERS 



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Palatine. III. 



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Schaumburg 



in thp Algonquin 
Shoppinc Center 



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Page 6 



THE HARBINGER 



Oct. 9,1973 



Hawks drop one to Iowa Central 



By PHIL BATTAGLIA 

Harper's Hawks played 
Iowa -Central, the nationi^s 
number one football team. 
Sat. Sept 29. at Dogers Sta- 
dium. The game got under 
way wHh the Hawks receiv- 
ing, opening kick-off was a 
squibber that hit a Hawk 
lineman, bounded away and 
was driven by the Panthers 
for the 1st TD in the game 
with 11 43 remaining The 
Hawks received again and 
was 1st and 10 on their own 
32 They continued to move 
the ball up to the 41 where 
there was a fumble and the 
Panthers took over, but Har- 
per's defense look over and 
with a few good moves by 
Terri Corry the Hawks 
stopped the Panthers drive 
and ended the 1st quarter 
with a 7-0 score. 

In the 2nd quarter the 
Panthers actually domi- 



nated. Joe Bombicino 

showed excellent moves. He 
took the ball all the way into 
the end zone where he was 
stopped by the Hawks d«» 
fense on the 9 yd. line, with 
only 4 seconds remaining. 
This was a highlight that 
cost the Hawks the game 
The ball was snapped and the 
clock was not started until 
after the ball had left the 
(Quarterbacks hand The 

clock sounded while the ball 
was still in the air and the 
second Panther touchdown 
was completed ending the 
1st half with a scoreof 13-0 

The 3rd quarter the Hawks 
received and Kevin Leo put 
the ball on the 43 There 
was another fumble and the 
Panthers recovered the ball 
But the Hawks got it back 
and Andreas executed a 
beautiful 55yd pass to Kim- 
brough who completely rtm 



past the Panthers and struted 
into the end zone at 13:21. 
The rest of the 3rd quarter 
was just a back and forth 
motion between both teams 
with neither one giving an 
inch, ending the 3rd at 13-6. 
4th quarter the game was 
marked by the conditions of 
the field and the point that 
the offenses couldn't hold 
onto the wet ball causing a 
lot of fumbles and more back 
and forth motion between 
both teams leaving the final 
score of 13-6 with the 
Hawks losing. 

But the Hawks were 
hampered and slowed down 
due to the condition of the 
Doger Stadium turf, reduced 
in places to a pig pen by 
the end of the game Heavy 
rains in the prior days before 
the game left the floor of 
the stadium with puddles of 
water here and there, making 




J Iowa Central Collegian 

t — ^^ 



it difficult for all 

All in all the Hawks played 
a good game wit^i 173 total 
yards as compared to the 
Panthers 250; far better than 
our lost to them last year 
at 40-13 

CAME STATISTICS 

Htirprr Iuwh C. 
Ktrai downs 7 15 



Yds. RushinK 

Vidt Eatiting 

ToiaJOffeMe 
loWnWays 
i'unts (avR) 
Fumbles lost 
Yds. i'enalized 
Pasaes 



SCORK BY PERIODS 

HAKI'KK 6 « 

IOWA i 7 1.1 1.1 l.J 



70 


217 


57 


-• .33 


127 


250 


" 65 


81 


10(35) 


6<36) 


1 


2 


3(25) 


5<.55) 


7-lft-O 


2 11-1 



1^ This skiing season, the 
styl^is easy. loose, natural, 
and rhythmic But one can't 
possibly hit the slopes with- 
out building elasticity, 
suppleness, and strength, 
through prepeaaon condition- 
ing exercises 

So to prevent lost skiing 
days as result of sore mus- 
cles, and to avoid injury from 
an occasional tumble, here 
are some exercises designed 
to stretch, loosen, and pre- 
pare one's body easily and 
naturally for fluid rhythms 
of modem skiing. 

TOE TOUCHING 

Stand straight, arms to 
side, knees locked Now roll 
down, forward, curving the 
shoulders, letting the arms 
dangle and the head sink to 
the chest Bre|ithe deeply 
Reach as far toward the toes 
as you can withixM bobbing 
When your hamstring ten- 
dons feel thd pull. relax 
in that position a few se- 
conds Remember to keep 
your head relaxed 



Ski buffs warm up for winter 



ANKLE BENDS 

Use a chair or table for 
support Stand facing the 
support, three or four feet 
fr(xn it, lean forward and 
place your hands on it. Keep- 
ing your heels on the floor, 
press forward and downward 
with your knees, until you 
feel the pull in your Achilles 
tendons. Stop short of pain. 
Proceed gently, gradually 
pressing your knees farther 
forward Relax 

TORSO TWISTING 

Stand comfortably, arms 
at side Swing your arms 
loosely like a baseball swing, 
twisting your back, torso, 
and rib cage Twist until 
'you feel the pull Remem- 
ber to breathe deeply. 
TORSO BENDS 

Stand at a comfortable 
straddle Keep torso and 
shoulders facing tar^atd. 
and bend down as if to touch 
ankle on outside of your foot 
Keep knees straight Repeat 
on each side. 
EDGINC; 



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Start in a sitting position, 
pressing weight against the 
outside of the foot, then the 
inside Try the same thing 
standing, proceeding gently 
until y(xj are sure the ankle 
will bear the weight of your 
body; then walk around a few 
steps on the outsides of the 
feet, then the insides This 
exercise is great for deve- 
loping strong ankles of edge 
control. 
SPLITS 

Stand with the legs well 
apart, toes pointing outward 
at right angles toeach other 
Keeping most of your weight 
on one foot, with that knee 
straight, gradually bend the 
opposite knee until you feel 
pull along the inseam'of the 
extended leg Keep toes 
firmly on the floor Reverse 
to the other leg. Relax. 
This develops snowplow 
muscles and nelps avoid a 
particularly wicked sore- 
ness 
TOE PULLS 

Stand so you can support 
yourself at the side, with a 



Mi 



chair, table, or wall. Reach 
behind you and grab your 
toe on the side away from 
the support Pull your foot 
up toward your back, doub- 
ling your leg Pull gently, 
until you feel the stretch in 
your thigh muscle as well 
as your foot. Relax as much 
as possible while pulling up- 
wards Change legs and re- 
peat. 
BACK BENDS 

Stand three or four feet 
Irom a wall, and reach back 
over your head until you can 
touch the wall with your 
palms. Now walk' ycxir 
hands down the wall, gra- 
dually increasing the 
stretching force on your sto- 
mach muscles. If you've 
ever had back trouble, don't 



attempt the exercise until 
you ve checked with your 
doctor 
NECK ROLLS 

This is ^ great favorite 
with Yog^^mhusiasts Stand 
or sit in a relaxed position 
Gently turn the head from 
side to side, as far as it 
will go without pain Let 
it loll around the periphery 
of its miiiement;then reverse 
direction Make sure the 
shoulders are relaxed 

It should be recognized 
that muscles must work to 
stay in shape It does not 
matter whether this work is 
in the form of play or cal- 
isthenics Its rewards are 
more than worthwhile; better 
skiing and a strong sense 
of well-being. 



Intramural activities offered 




Coach Roy Kearns (asst 
prof ) of intra mural athle- 
tics is offering for the first 
tieme a series of sports for 
the students during the day 
at noon till one. Mon thru 
Fri The activities offered 
will consist of touch foot- 
ball and soft ball for the 
men Equipment may be 
checked out by contacting the 
coach in room F345. 

Also there will be a pow- 



derpuff touch football game 
for the women Two teams 
are needed Practice will 
be held Tues and Thurs 
from noon till one Prac- 
tices have already started. 
Prospective players can sign 
up in F345 

The game will be played 
during half-time, when the 
Harper Hawks take on Jo- 
liet at Buffalo Grove High 
School. Nov 10 



Before you buy 

Auto Insurance 
Calf 495-0648 

* Good student discount * Motorcycles all CC's 

* Driver training credit ' Financial Responsibility 

• 20% Savings for faculty 

Bradley/Bradley Agency Insurance Inc. 



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H>1?BINGER 

William Rainey Harper College, Algonquin and Roselle Roads, Palatine. Illinois 60067, 312-397-3000 



Vol. 7. No. 5 



October 15.1973 



STUDENT SENATORS ELECTED 



By 

DIANE DiBARTOLOMEO 

Fifteen senators were elect- 
ed to The Student Senate on 
Octol>er 10 for the '73- '74 
■chool year. 

A total of 257 ballots were 
cast with three being invalid. 
The turnout at the polls was 
similar to the number of 
senator petitions ^ubmitted- 
very poor. There were fifteen 
senatorial positions open 
and only nineteen candidates 
running. 

Although the turnout was 
poor, the senators proved to 
be a tucccM. At an October 
1 1 Senate meeting, new ideas 
were heard. A promising fu- 
ture was revealed through 
the voices of new senators; 
Steve Bowman. Joyce Bruz- 
zini, Stacey Brooks Buec- 
chel, David M. Franson, 
James F. Fink. Dave Hanne- 



man, Doug Janis, Med a 
Johnson, Jackie Krolopp, 
Greg LaCrosse, Rick Mc- 
Intyre, James Richter, 
Jeanne Rodseth, Stan Sapie- 
ha and Carole Schuh. 

Bob Hay hurst. Student 
Senate President, said that 
his senate is looking pret- 
ty good due to the fact that 
there is a "diversity of stu-. 
dents." Hayhurst also ex- 
pressed hopes of encourag- 
ing more students to attend 
meetings. 

In other Senate business; 
Tom Trunda was appointed 
to The Student Evaluation 
Committee and George Po- 
lales to The Student Conduct 
Committee. An educational 
trip was scheduled for two 
senators and two political 
Science majors. Twenty dol- 
lars was approved for home- 
coming decorations. 




Newly elected Senators (from bottom left), Siaivy Bui-M.hel, Meda John- 
son, Senate Secretary Kris Johnson, Jackie Krolopp, Jeanne Rodseth. 
(2nd Row) Hope Spruance, Activities Advisor, Rick Mclntyre, Senate 
Pres. Bob Hayhurst, Greg LaCrosse, Tom Trunda. and Frank Borelli 
Activities Advisor. (Top Row) Jim Fink, Mark Taboc. V.P., Doug Janis, 
Dave Hanneman and Mark Goldsmith treasuMrr. 



By SUE POLLACK 



Sex bias at Harper 



V, 



A report of the Illinois 
Commission on the Status 
of Women names Harper, 
among several other sub- 
urban public junior colleges. 
as discriminating against 
women faculty members and 
administrators " 

Whether sexual discrim- 
ination actually doesexist at 
Harper is hard to determine 
The number of men teaching 
full-time, for instance, is 
twice the numt)er of women 
100 as opposed to 50 Part- 
time faculty reflects approx- 
imately the same ratio, 
though the proportion varies 
widely within the different 
divisions there are 17 wo- 
men part -time instructors in 
Communications. and 12 
men; 7 women in the Social 
Sciences and 28 men: and one 
female part-time teacher in 
Engineering along with 9 
men. 

These figures alone can- 
not indicate discrimination 
or the lack of it. however; 
what must also be consider- 
ed are such factors as the 
number of comparably quali - 
fied men and women that 
have applied for positions 
at Harper in relation to the 
number that havebeenhired 
According to the Social Sci- 
ence') division, one out of 



four applications to their 
department is from a wo- 
man, and the ratio of wo- 
men to men currently teach- 
ing there full-time is atxxit 
the same 

In the Engineering divi- 
sion, one application out of 
the 19 received in the past 
few months was from a wo- 
man, and all but one of its 
full and part-time staff are 
men The Business depart- 
ment reported one woman 
and nine men teaching full- 
time, while one out of every 
five who apply is female. 

Ms Sharon Alter. As- 
sistant Professor of History, 
explained that evencomplete 
figures can never fully de- 
termine to what extent the 
purported discrimination ex- 
ists, since it stems from 
within the personalities of 
the people who do a school's 
recruiting and hiring One 
of the Commission's charges 
was that the lack of women 
department heads here 
signifies sexual discrimina- 
tion on the administrations 
part, this may be partially 
refuted. Ms, Alter stated, 
with situations where the 
women qualified to bechair- 
men just don't want the job 
She knows of at least one 
instance at Harper where 
this has been so 

In the administrative area. 



Harper boasts two female 
directors of the college 
While Ms Alter said she 
wouldn't charge Harper as 
being discriminatory as a 
whole, she pointed out that, 
even here, the two positions 
would still have tot>eclassi- 
fied as what is commonly 
thought to be "a woman's 
role '■ Ms Maryann Milter. 
Director of Community Ser- 
vices, sees this as being 
part of the status quo 

"We live in a conserva- 
tive part of the country. " 
she commented "It has a 
built-in sex bias, though sub- 
tle, in all social and busi- 
ness interactions. ■■ She 
added, however, that she 
feels "Harper is to be recog- 
nized for utilizing the hu- 
man resources available in 
women " 

Not only may women have 
trouble getting hired at area 
colleges, but they are also 
paid up to $3,000 less than 
men per year, according to 
the Illinois Commission's 
report. Harper administra- 
tion will not discloseor ver- 
ify any of its faculty salar- 
ies, but both Ms Alter and 
Ms Miller admitted "there 
might be some discrepanc- 
ies " Raises, Ms Miller 
explained, are automatic on 
the level of the position, so 
discrimination at that point 



is eliminated, bit even with 
this aspect equalized be- 
tween the sexes, "there 
are. " as she noted, "no 
women vice - presidents 
here ' 

Furthermore. Ms.. Miller 
said, the "buddv system" Is 
what promotesHarper facul- 
ty as well as people out- 
side in the business com- 
munity; interviews, evalua- 
tions, and recommendations 
make both the hiring and 
promoting processes "good 
ones procedurally, but just 
the same they can never be 
totally cleared of bias 
against women or anyone 
else" 

Ms Alter pointed out that 
because no wage scale is 



used at Harper, any sexual 
discrimination that exists 
can more easily be hidden. 
A woman is hired within a 
certain income range and 
has no assurance that her 
salary is the same as that of 
an equally qualified man. 
A main assumption that ad- 
ministrations use in deter- 
mining salaries, she went on. 
is that a man can or should 
be paid more than a woman 
because he had a family to 
support; but many of Har- 
pers women faculty mem- 
bers, she noted, are married 
and also support more than 
themselves 

Dr. Lahti stated in the 

(Tura to Fagc 2 ) 



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«H>4RBINGER 



October 15. 1973 



V;A. Ovtreach 



^m 



Oct. 15, 1973 



f€ 



H/1RBINGER 



Page 3 



Anyone who comes Into our 
Veteran office can get some 
type of help with virtually 
any problem they have, said 
Carl Jerl, one of the three 
outreach workers that the 
Veterans Office of Harper 
College has. What ever the 
problem. Carl said this 
agency can give immediate 
help to the vet. or if not, 
be able to send him to the 
proper people he needs to 
see Carl stated that their 
main function as Outreach 
workers is essentially one of 
solving the vets problems 

A veteran coming to Har- 
per and a new town may need 
to find housing or employ - 
menl Another veteran may 
be having a gard time adjus- 
ting to the society around 



school, or a bet's monthly 
GI Bill check may have 
stopped These are but a few 
problems that Outreach 
Workers versatilty ukes 
""care of. 
• Anyone talking with Carl 
learns quickly that he is just 
one of them Here Carl 
promotes friendship and un- 
derstanding Being able to 
offer assistance to the vet 
has become a personal 
achievement for the Out- 
reach Workers. 

Carl charaterlzed Out- 
reach as a buffer between 
the veterans service life and 
the outside world He ex- 
plained that hte man comes 
form as atmosphere of 
secirotu. where everything 



is taken care of, to a 
situation where the person 
must provide things for him- 
self Outreachs goal, he 
said, is to make the tran- 
sition as smooth as possible 
Counseling and testing 
counseling are part of help- 
ing theveterandevelopepro- 
flciencies. and points him to- 
wards that end. This applies 
to both academic and trade 
pursuit adding that many 
veterans realize they dont 
want to pursue a college 
degree Any veteran with 
a problem or suggestion is 
welcome to call the Ve- 
terans Office, daily at 397- 
3000, EXT 254, from 8:30 
to 4:30 and 6 00 p m to 8 00 
p m on Mondays and Wed- 
nesdays. 




Selection of Rep. undecided 



By RONALD POREP 

Robert Hayhurst. Studertt 
Senate presldait. has an- 
nounced that Harper students 
will soon select the way that 
their new student board 
member will be selected as 
prescribed by a new Sute 
bill 

•There are two ways we 
can select the student who 



will represwit the student 
body on the college board. 
One is by a Senate com- 
mittee appointing a grojp 
of candidates and then hav- 
ing die entire Senate vote 
The other is an open elec 
tk>n of all students A refer- 
endum will be held right after 
the general Sepate election 
to determine the method to 
be used." explained Hay- 



Singies Only-Acapuico Holiday 




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Say "I love you" 

with more love 

than money. 




Y^ we trave f me quality 
diamonds for $98 And on up 
toO.OOO You lUindtheniinany 
one of our stores And you II 
appreciatetafo rulesevery 

Hollands ^^oyee lives by 



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nrsi we never high pressure. We 

prefer that you shop slowly and 
carefully Look at only those 
diamondsthat you can afford We 
have a large selection in your price 
category Ashasmanyquestionsas 
youlike We 1 1 give you all the 
answers Straight 



SecorHJ. since 1 91 our poNcy of 
returning your money i f for any 
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So if you have the love and a little 
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hurst. 

The person elected will 
not be a voting member oC 
the board but will be able 
to voice his opinion on any 
proposed board action with- 
out having to be scheduled 
nranths before. 

"I attend all college board 
meetings now. but I can nor 
speak out on any issue with- 
out having been scheduled 
in beforehand This student 
will be able to speal( out 
on all board issues without 
prior notice to the board 
as can regular board mem- 
bers. " explained Hayhurst 

After it has been deter 
mined how the student board 
meml>er will l)e selected, any 
student can request his name 
to be placed on the ballot 
or before the committee for 
consideration 

•The bill did not define 
who can run. but Just stated 
that "a student ' is to be a 
board member We are in- 
terpreting this to mean that 
any student -- full or part- 
time - can be the member ' 



Abortion Is murder! Anyonewho 
condones abortion la a murderer, 
as Is anyone who performs the pro- 
cedure. Any woman who would 
submit to an abortion, or worse, 
openly seek an abortion Is a mur- 
derer. 

These are Just a few of the idiotic 
notions harbored by the many 
"goody-goody, stick your nose In 
someone else's business" organisa- 
tions that have taken up the anti- 
abortion ficht recently. 

It seems to me that there are so 
many other areas In which these 
"busy-bodies" could keep their 
bodies busy. 

For example, the Right to Life 
organizations cguld and In my 
opinion ihould - show a little more 
concern for Oiose human lives that 
are In danger because of sub- 
standard living conditions, racial 
or ethnic preiudkes, and hunger. 
There Is so much constructive work 
that can be done for people with- 
out running around brow-beating 
Innocent women because they 
choose not to bring another un- 
wanted child Into our society. 

I am aware of the trite nature 
of this line of argument, but often 
Hmes more truth can be expressed 
in a trite statement than in all of 
the originality one can muster. 

The simple truth of unwanted 
children U startllf«. Orphanages 
are depressli^y over-crowded. 
The number of children rtetdln g 
parenU surpasses by far the 
number of parents wandns chil- 
dren. 

Another argument that may be 
seen as trite Is also Irrevocably 
trie. In those areas of the world, 
in addition to those areas In this 
country, where poverty levels are 
as low as the birth rate is high, 
children are being made Innocent 
victims of social genodlce, govern- 
ments, churches, and other organ- 
fatatlorM that should be concerned 
with aid and education programs 



to be more concerned with 
self-destruction through over-pop- 
uladoa 

Medically, abortion —perhaps 
pregnancy termination is a better 
phrase) during the first 10 to 12 
wedcs following conception Is a 
relatively simple procedure and 
most doctors are in agreement that 
until the 13th or 14th week of 
pregnancy the fetus is not a hu- 
man organism. 

Isn't it about time we stopped 
Judgii^ our fellow man by our 
own standards and started help- 
ing him with understanding, com- 
passion, and un-sdflshneas? Isn't 
it about time we tried helping those 
people, young aiMl old, who are 
with us - alive and not too well? 



WIGS 

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CloMd on Mon. 




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CHANDLER'S, INC. ANNUAL TEXTBOOK VWAREHOUSE 
SALE-Our entire vKorehouse stock of over one million 
textbook«~nrfW and u$ed-both hardbound and paper- 
back-current editions andout-of-prints-50%ormoreoH 
list price. CASH AND CARRY ONLY. All soles final. 
Monday thru Saturday, Oct. 29th to Nov. 3rd, 9 A.M. 
to 5 P.M. Chandler's, Inc. Textbook Division, New lo 
cation of 1019 University Place, Evonston, Illinois. 
One block South of Emerson and 1/2 block West off 
of Maple. Directly across from the Evonston city 
yards. 




<' 



Sex bias 



(Cent from Page I ) 

Chicago Tribune that the 
Commissions discrimina- 
tion survey was "superfic- 
ial." and that Harpers dif- 
ficulty lies in finding women 
qualified for administrative 
positions Perhaps some of 
the trouble is also Harper s 
attitude toward the female 
sex as a whole, for the ster- 
eotype that women are best, 
and sometimes only, suited 
for community service, soc- 
ial - oriented activities, and 
teaching English is not only 
illustrated here but maybe 
helping create the situation 
as well. 



The University of Illi 
nois offers scholarships to 
children of veterans of 
WWl, WWII, and the Na 
lional Emergency between 
June 25. 1950 and .January 
31, 1955 One scholarship 
will be awarded in each 
category in every Illinois 
county The scholarship is 
a tuition waiver for any 
program for 4 years at 
any of the University of 
Illinois camixises 

If you are eligible or 
know someone who is, come 
to the Financial Aids Of 
fice for more details 



Whiz Kids 



By BL'HIi \ kt.LIKLLIS 

The Whiz Kids were the 
best act I liave ever seen 
at Harper College. They 
were tight and precise and 
exciting The one character- 
istic missing from most con 
certs lately has been the lack 
of personality in the musi- 
cians 

The Whiz Kids had the 
personality, plus their un- 
canny ability to perform well 
and simultaneously on sev- 
eral instruments 

They played a wide variety 
of electronically influenced 
popular songs (such as 
"Stairway To Heaven ■).and 
some of their own. which 
fared equally well 

For a group involving only 
two players they produced 
more sounds than other 
groups involving many more 
players The comment that 
they are the Emerson, Lake. 



and PalmerofDetroit is cer- 
tainly well deserved, and 
maybe with a little time 
and work they too can rise 
toward the top 

The acoustics were al- 
most bearable, apparently 
due to extra care taken by 
the sound men during the 
performance. 

All in all IT WAS A VERY 
enjoyable concert and 1 am 
sure that everyone that 
showed up will agree. 



' 4^ 


^ 


i 'Vv ^ - 


-# 




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1 



L^wMCNce R Kiel. 

PHOTOGRAPHER 



•••••aie 




WHIZ KIDS (Pholo by L. R. Kiel) 



WHIZ KIDS (Ph(»to by Paul Cord) 



Representatives of the 
Illinois Army National Guard 
will be available in Building 
A. Room 241b. on 17 Oct 
197.3 These representatives 
will be available to provide 
current information about 
the guard 

Come out and find what 
the Guard has to offer in 
Job training, in extra cash, 
in leadership training, in 
your interest 

Don't rely on secondhand 
rumor, find out from the 
Guard, why today it s a new 
army. 

You are invited to report 
08.30hrs 12 OOhrs 




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Page 4 



T€ 



H/1RBINGER 



Oct. 15, 1973 



OUTPU- 



» 



Stress on powers 

As of this writing the war in the Middle HIast is three 
days and several thousands dead old. The military here 
in the U.S. say that neither side is likely to obtain vic- 
tory soon. If the war continues as it is, the Israelis can 
hope to achieve, at best, a very limited victory. And it 
would be at a terrible cost in money and lives. But 
reports from Israelis say that they can only continue to 
fight at the present level of intensity for ten to twelve 
days. After that their military strength would be too low 
to maintain any security at all. 

Already the ambassador from Israel has said that his 
country needs more time and equipment. The request 
is receiving support from Senators Henry Jackson (Wash- 
ington) and Harrison Williams (New Jersey). It has al- 
so been reported that an Israeli plane was seen at the 
Oceana Naval Air Station in Virginia Ikach, Va. The 
report said that the Israeli Boeing 707 was being load-* 
-«d with, anumg other things. Sparrow and Sidewinder 
air-to-air missiles. Also reports have come in saying 
that the Russians have shipped several plane and ship 
loads of military equipment (including the Sam-6, 
an advanced surface-to-air missle) to Syria and Kgypt. 

It appears that if the war continues as is, the big 
powers (the U.S. and Soviet Union) will be under tre- 
mendous pressure to supply military assistance to 
their Middle Ea»t allies. This is turn would put stress 
on Soviet-American relations, which would destroy any- 
thing we have accomplished ^during the past couple of 
years In regard to those relations. 

The lime has come for the United Nations to come 
out of their shell and take affirmative action on this 
matter and bring the bloodshed to a halt. It has so far 
been unable to do what it was created to do, stop and 
settle world disputes before they become the crisis 
of a war. We also put it up to the major powers to re- 
strain themselves from sending more equipment Into 
the battle. TTiis is imperative for the potential for another 
Vietnam is clearly there. 



' 'its'' 



«H>1RBINGER # 



Kdltor-in-chief 
Managing Kditor 
itusiness Manager 
News Kditor 
Features Kditor 
Activities Kditor 
Sports Kditor 
Cartoon Kditor 
Thoto Kditor 
Photographers: 



Diane Diliartolomeo 

l)onn Lynum 

(■iar>- Zdcb 

Honald I'orcp ~ 

Hon Zobcris 

Heidi Johnson 

I'hil Battaglia 

Dennis Murrav 

K. R. Kk?l 

dreg Conway. Paul Cord, Ken 

Kissam. Jim Moy, Mike Wellman 

and Chuck Zemeske 



Contributing Staff 
Mary Beth Christy. Dave (iordon. Frank McC.overn, Sue 
Pollack. Steve Schlosscr, K. K. Sinnott. C.arriW White. Bill 
Whitehead (leorge Polales III. Rich Kusnierek 
Advisor - Mr. Sturdevanl 



The HARBIN(;KR is the student publication for the 
Harper College campus community, published weekly 
except during holidays and mid-terms. All opinions ex- 
pressed on the editorial page or in the columns are 
those of the writer, and are not necessarily those of the 
college, its administration, faculty or student body. 

For information on advertising, rates and publica- 
tion schedule, call or write Harbinger Business Of- 
fice. 

William Rainey Harper College. Algonquin and 
Roselle Rds., Palatine. Illinois 60067. Phone num- 
ber .397-3000, exi. 272 and 460. . 



INPIJ 



Stand up and fight like a man 



To the married men. who 
have a wife who does not 
work. I ask them WHY' Put 
your wife to work, and you 
stay at home Let her know 
what it is like to be the 
breadwinner Then when she 
comes home, tell her that 
you have a headache, and 
that vou are not in the mood 
to fuinU her amorous adven - 
tares. See how long she 
lasts 

I can think of nothing more 
stimulating than a date with 
a girl who has just complet- 
ed a cross country run in the 
c^of a d«sil«, or one who 
has just finished planting 
thirty trees I think that a 
girl like this would be ter- 
ribly sexy in a pink chiffon 
evening g,awn 

I would let her take me to 



all the expensive restau- 
rants, and then out to a 
show I figure that the whole 
evening would only cost her 
around forty dollars, and if 
she is nice to me. I will 
still shake her hand. 

If this sounds bitter. I 
guess that it is I for one. 
do not care to have some- 
body, who has never lived 
my life call me a sexist 
pig. Just because I look 
at some girl who is wearing 
a dress which exposes a 
large amount of a shapely 
anatomy. I don't like some 
body telling me how easy it 
is to be a male in this soc- 
iety, when there is no pas- 
sible way for that person to 
know what she is talking 
about 



What difference 
does it make? 



My name is I am 

announcing my candidacy for 
student senate I think that I 
should be elected because of 
the following reaaons: 

I 1 was on student gov- 
ernment in Junior High 2 I 
am not a member of any mi - 
'norlty group ^ 1 really 
want to get involved 4 I 
want to be a part of the 
really important decisions 
made in .student senate ev- 
ery day ^ I want a tuition 
rebate. 6 I will do my very 
best 7. I was always in 
terested in government k I 
- want the students to have a 
say In what happens at Har 
per. 9 I was an honor stu- 
dent 10 I want to changr 
the world II I believe I 

have thf .tbility to lead 12 
I had a j^ood limt- as a part 
of the Hijjh -^hool govern 
ment and I want to repeal 
the expi-rit nee I.T 1 want 
to maki- ^.t^l(Jl nl senate me.in 
something I J Im afraid 
things won i get done unless 
I'm thf'« i!> do I hem If) 
I want tr) H«>t my namo and 
picture in ihf paper IK 1 
want to A !(>«• Dill apathy 17 
I will |<i'>t( <t the students 
rights 1^ I want to go nn 
free trips I . 1 will he 
respoasi' i- .> ludent neetls 

20 1 w.int () mi't't mier- 
esting |>t>.pl( ..nd do inter 
esting III n^> .'1 I am con 



judice - 1 I .im an active 
feminist .' • I .im activeina 
local K( (jvioliL-an (Democra 
tici orgaM.^aiiun ;:6 I uani 
to see what the work! is all 
about through senate 27 I 
want to lM>f rfMi's represents - 
live on studi-nt senate 2H 
How much do yiKi really know 
about student Henate? You 
probably ilont know and that 
is why I m n.nning 29 I 
'vant to kill lampant cor- 
ruption tn ilw student sen 
ate to I Iwvi sei'n all the 
marshal .irts films M I 
care aUmt tl.." students at 
Harper t sometimes I 

cry all n i -•» 

'• i; whii. 



Men of the world unite 
The time has come for us, 
as members of the -group 
of primate referred to as 
HonK) Sapiens to stand up, 
and demand things which 
have been denied us for too 
long 

I look at the present trend 
of the female members of 
this group to demand libera- 
tion, and 1 think to myself. 
If it is right for them, than 
why isn't it right for me'' 
This might, at fir.st glance 
appear to be an extremely 
poor comp>arison. but once 
one thinks about it It takes— 
on new light When was the* 
last time that a girl asked 
youior a date, and then paid 
for that date'' It has been 
the accepted role of the Am 
erican Male to cater to the 
desires of the female for too 
long. The time has come for a 
change 

Next lime you and your 
favorite woman are out for a 
night, nnake her pay Why 
should you continue to foot 
the bilP Ask her ^as your 
equal to do the thfngs that 
you have IxM-n doing for her 
Let her ojH'n 'hr dmirs. and 
drive, and sw«>at out the 
money for o-.u-f L<'t her 
make all of th*- liecisions 
that go into a date 

I for om .ini tired of 
placing a fen.alf on a pedes- 
tal, in hopes that she will 
think that I am polite 

The second phase of this 
movement is to write your 
congressman, and demand 
that for the next twenty 
years, the armed forces 
draft females, and put them 
into the companies tradition 
ally occupied by men I.«t 
them knoM Mliat being a male 
in this country is like 

M Chauvinist 



cerned 


I. I im taking soc- 


iology 


"id ps\rholoR\' and 


basket 


n iTiii and feel tli.it 


these tl 


-'-. I an he applied 


to IP«' 


.- .1 < -luitor 2.i I 


am ii«.i 


.Ills of ()i 1 




<. 



Oct. 15. 1973 



T€ 



H/1RBINGER 



Pma9 5 




tampus? 



Photo by L. R. Kiel 



^ •:?•::;#!• ■i;ir ■}.-'•'■ jfr-:^^.^^ '.i!:.':!'^! 



5B Wt»„ gjiioi, M an J a bit of her W^\ 
FALL FASHION 
GIFT CERTIFICATE 



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I 19/3 Limn one 

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Not transterabieof 

•fiffniabip in casM 
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r'«nd anrt Genital Roads 



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EVERY TUESDAY IS HARPER NITE! 



PITCHER OF BEER 



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Bring this Ad! 



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(East of Paloline) 



m^im 



'/iid^m 




Reminisce 

The pattern o/ this ring dates to 

the Middle Ayes where it was known 

as "the ceremonial ring." 

The symbols used then are as appropriate 
today as thfiy were in the year 1320 

Joined Hearts 
two mortal souls m love 

Clasped Hands 
togetherness lor a lifetime 

Scnptuies 
wisdom Ql the ages tor guidance 

Horn ol Plenty 
tuHillment and happiness 

> * Orange Blossoms 
symbols ot the dream you share 

Reminisce A ring as eternal as time 
As young as your dream 



2 North Dunlon 
ArlinM'«>n Mto . IN. 

253-4690 

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Page 6 



f€ 



H/1?BINGER 



Oct. 15, 1973 




IT 



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Phone : 358-2550 



OF EVENTS 

On Campus — 
"Triumph of the Will," Hitler's rally at Nuremburg. 

Documentary of a dictator's philosophy and methods. 

Oct. 19. 8:00. El 06. Admission SI. 
"A Thief in the Night, " motion picture about what can 

happen when Christ returns. Presented by Seekers, 

Oct. 16, 12:30, El 07. 
Mini-Course in Ceramics. Learn how to form, shape and 

fire objects from clay. Limited enrollment. Lab fee 

$1. Tues. and Thurs., 12:00-1:50. Oct. 16 and 

18. TlOl. 
Harper Players. Tues., 12:30, K304. 
Student .Senate Mtg., Thurs., 12:30, A241-A& B. 
Seekers, Thurs.. 12:00-1:30, D227. 
Ski Club Mtg., Tues., 12:15, D231. 

Harper Players, casting tryouts, Tues. at 12 and 
9 p.m. Mtg. F304 
Ski Club Bake Sale, Wed., 9^, Lounge 

ThtMtre— 
"The Wonderful Ice Cream Suit," starring Joe Mantegn a 

and Cordiss Keier. Organic Theatre Co. at l>eo A. 

Ixrner Theatre in Tptown Center Hull House. Ph. 

LO 1-8033. 

The .Night They .Shot Harry Lindsey with a 155MM 

Howitzer and Blamed It On Zebras," political farce 

starring Mina Kolb. Premieres Oct 18 at The Body 

Politic. Ph. 477-1977. 
'Fret^dom of the City," about the conflict in Northern 

Ireland. At the Goodman Theatre thru Nov. 11. 

Ph. 236-2337. 
"Father's Day," comedy on divorce, starring Chita 

Rivera and Julie Adams. Ivanhoe Theatre. Ph. 248- 

6800orC.R 2-2771. 
"The Skin of our Teeth." Thornton Wilder 's spoof of 

mankind's Indestructibility through the ages, starring 

Sarah .Miles. Arlington Park Theatre, thru Nov. 18. 

Ph. 392-6800. 
"Oh Datf, Poor Dad. Momma's Hung You in the Closet 

and I'm Feeling so Sad," presented by Schaumburg 

Festival Theatre, Oct. 19-21, 26-28, Schaumburg 

Public Llbrarv. 8:30, 7:3a on Sundays. Ph. 289- 

4785. 
The National Chinese Opera Theatre from the Republic 

of China. Auditorium Theatre. Oct. 19 & 20 at 8:(H), 

Oct. 21 at 2:00. Tickets available at box office or any 

Ticketron ( Kitlet. 
CiMitinuing.— 
"Grease," Blackstone Theatre. Ph. ST 2-2280 
"Children of the Wind, " .Studebake/ Theatre Ih. SI 2 

2280. 

Muoii — 

•Sandler «: Young, Mill Run Theatre, thru Oct. 22. Ph. 
298-2 1 70. 

The Kinks, Auditorium Theatre, Oct. 24. 8:00 I'h 
922-2110. 
Clrm- — 

Ringllng Bros, and Barnum & Bailey C Ircus, Chicago 
International Amphitheatre, thru Oct. 22. All seats 
reserved. Ph. 847-4748. 



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tcoriKjiM tisoo 

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v*iui iijo or. 



« t\tr I 



NOW $219 



PRO SPORT CENTER 

205 E. Evergreen Ml. Prospint 394-980O 



Oct- 15, 1973 



K 



H/f^BJNGER 



Pag* 7 



H/1R6MGER FOLIES 



+ 




t 




DISTORTION 




"I don't know ... I just feel like 
my whole life is just a big mess." 



Ww<< 




397-81 H,"} 
iM7 AlKorxiuin Rd. 
'Next to Heef N' Barrel" 
SchaumburK 



is th« Hot Dog 
Dood? 

NO! 

But it's hard to breathe under 
a heap of onions, relish on a 
poppy seed bun. 
Ask any hot dog. 
ASK OURS! 



Chinese women's lib 

TOKYO (AP) - Chinese 
women who follow the 
resolutions at recent wo- 
men's congresses will 
marry late and promote the 
"sharing o f household 
chores between husband and 
wife." a Peking broadcast 
said T 

Nixonmugs confiscated 

Secret Service agents have 
confiscated some 2.000 cof- 
fee mugs, each bearing the 
likeness of President Nixon 
on mock currency, from a 
downtown San Rafael (Calif.) 
firm. Agents said the reason 
for the seizure was that the 
mugs bore a facsimile of a 
dollar bill with a picture of. 
the President where George 



Washington's por|ra it usual- 
ly resides. (AP) 



Where traffic fines 
can be paid in blood 

LEXINGTON. Ky (AP) - 
Motorists can now pay traf- 
fic fines in blood at Fayette 
Quarterly Court here. 

The court, according to 
John Norris, director of the 
Central Kentucky Blood Cen- 
ter, is offering, for persons 
between the ages of 18 and 
65. the option of donating a 
pint of blood to the center 
or paying a fine and costs. 

Court Clerk Katherine 
McBrayer said only fines 
up to and including $10 can 
be paid through a blood dona- 
tion. 



(!Ilas6ifieds 



1968 Dudge Coronet 

Auto. Trans, F/S 
Snow rim $525. 
CL 3-3862 

For Sale: 1973 Honda CB4S0. 
cutlom, 14" extended handle bar*. 
2.000 ml. good condition. 
Mutt «cll. $950.00 , 
CaU: 766-7431 or 255-8646. 

Wanted: 1 sir aight respectable malt 

to share rent of tuwnhouse 

with same, over 21. 

In Roaelk area. 

Call S944tn6 after 6:30 p.m. 

Garage Sale: Saturday, OcL 20 
103 N. Benton St. PalaMnc. 
Sponsored by the 
Dental Hygiene Department 



A I.I. m«ior brands available 
20 40 off fair trade Ust. 
35H871 1 MKK alter 5 & weekends 
l-eglt 



Help Wanted 

(lean cut young man 
to deliver food Tues. & Weds. 
Mrs. 4 30 11 30p m. 
Steady. Davtios 359-7267 
after 3 30 p.m. 

Sena Formal Wear 
Woodfleid Commons .Shopping 
(enter. 1223 (k)ld Rd. M»-4300 
Wanted male to work in 
retail store late aftcrnoont, 
e\'enings& Saturdays, 
(ail for further Information. 

Puhllr Rrlntirtn* 

need personable well groomed 

young men & women to call 

on local companies. 

For Blair Buolnena 8er%'ice« Inc. 

Mourn & days flexibia. 

.\o selling. 

S2.50 per hour. 35»6II0 

B— l erling 

200 S Mt Prospect 

De« Plaine*. Cook 

Kull & fart Time 

Immediate opening 

day St eve. shift 

Work around college schedule 

Weekdays or Sat. • 

Light work - new facUitlct 

Call or apply 

Kasterling Co. 

298-7120 

Representative .Needed! 

Karn $200.00 plus each semester 

with only a few hours work 

at the t>eginning of the semester. 

International Marketing Service 

519 (Henrock Ave., 

Suit 203. Los Angeles, Calif. 

90024 

Warehouw man 

Part-time in 

clean modern warehouse 

in KIk drove. 

No experience required. 

Phone Mr. ludd 

4399000 'rrr-'-- 

Drafting board, used 

36 X 60, needs new 

lino top $15.00. 

Call P. Daly X492 WED/FRI 

afternoons or humanities 

div. off. 



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Page 8 



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H/RBINGER 



Oct. 16, 1973 



Harper heartbreak at Rock Valley 



/ 



Golfing 

By RICH KU8NIEREK 

Even after watching his 
Hawks flnish in a dismal 
1 0th place, coach Roger 
Bechtold was In fairly good 
spirit "Considering the cir- 
cumstance, I thinlc we play- 
ed pretty well," coach Bech- 
told said. 

Finishing behind Lake 
County's winning score of 
291 Harper could only 
squeeze a total of 321. With 
a few good breaks and a 
healthy Rick Miller, the score 
would have been consider- 
ably lower. 

Scott Persson continued 
with his best effort with a 
round of 77 followed by 
I>ave Willits and Brian 
.Brown each with 81, Bob 
Powers 82, and Jeff Orrel 
with 87. 



/ 



Printed by Permiuion 
Paddock Publicatloiis 

By DON FSI8KE 

One by one, the Harper Hawks 
came out of the locker room. Some 
limped, some hung their heads, 
and some Justlookedouttnto space. 
All of them, though, had to have 
an empty feeling. The feeling that 
overcomes a person when some- 
thing they had wanted so badly 
had been taken away from them. 
The Hawks had Just lost the bat- 
tle for the title of number one team 
in Illinois. 31-28, and up until 
the last minute of play it appear- 
ed that they were going to walk 
away with a victory. 

The Trojans of Rock VaUey. 
however, thought twke and de- 
ckled that they didn't want to 
give up the number one spot 

With only 69 seconds left In the 
game, the Hawks led 28-21. They 
had the Trojfina deep in their own 
territory at the 16 yard line. 

It took the Trojans Just three 
plays to burst the Hawks' hope 
balloon, a sbc-yard run, a 2 1 -yard 
p«8s. and a 57-yard touchdown 
run by quarterback Dave Hopp- 
maa 

The Trojans then wouldn't set- 
tle for a tie so they attempted the 
two-point cdbversion. The attempt 
was good and wHh only 24 sec- 
onds left, the Hawks were down 
29-28. 

A Trojan safety with 10 second 
left ended the scoring. 

The Hawks, now 2-2. Jumped out 
to a 14-0 lead In the first quarter 
on two touchdown runs by Marty 
Williams. The first one was a four- 
yard run off right tackle at 10:53 
capping a 75-yard drive, 55 of 
which were covered by WUllams. 
The second was a 23-yard sprint 
at 2:46 with the drive covering 57 
yards. Williams ended the game 
with 161 yards in 21 carries. 
Fighting back to tie the game 
at 14 points apiece the Trojans 
used the same play to score the 
touchdowns. Both times the ball 



was carried in by halfback Russ 
HoCfman from two yards out 

^ With only seven seconds left in 
the first half, the Hawks utilized a 
big play to own a 21-14 lead at 
halftlme. 

Quarterback Pat Dempsey threw 
a 48-yard pass to halfback Kevin 
Uo to score the Hawks' third 
touchdown. The drive, which took 
only five plays to complete, cover- 
ed 85 yards. 

At 4:32 in the third quarter, the 
Hawks again took a 14-point lead 
on a four-yard pass from Dempsey 
to Erwin Klmbrough. Place kicker 
Kevin WUson booted his fourth 
extra-polm kick to end the Hawks 
scoring, givli^ them a 28- 14 lead. 

Deep in their own territory, the 
Trojans scored on a 92-yard run 
by halfback Robert Williams, after 
an offsides penalty had pushed 
them back to their eight yard line. 

From this point, the Hawks had 
two other opportunides in wtiich 
to score, both dmes getting the ball 
within the Trojans' 20 yard Une. 
On the first drive, a Ift-yard hold- 
ing penalty pushed them back to 
the Trojans' 24 yard line from the 



The Hawks lost the ball on the 
second drive as a result of a fumble. 
This play set up the Trojans' last 
minute touchdown, putting the 
Hawks and their fans into a state 
of shock. 

Eight of the Hawks' 18 first 
downs came in the first quarter, 
while the Trojans didn't have any 
of their 17 in the same period. 

The Hawks had a total of 386 
yards, ^99 of which were cover- 
ed on the ground. Their oppon- 
ento gained 236 total yards, 149 
of those coming on the two plays 

that dowYicd the Hawks' effort 

The long bus ride home gave 
the Hawks time to forget the game 
and think about next week's con- 
test Even though H will be a hard 
one to forget, the game is in the 
past and the Hawks have to go up 
against Concordia Saturday night 
in Milwaukee, Wis. 




'1 



Photo by Chuck Zemeske 



CRITICS RIVE! "I HILARIOUS MUSICIL!" 



Ut Want Ads 
Sell For You! 



For Sale 

Portable Smidt/Coroni 
typewriter t30. 
I'aU 29»«6»7 



Fur Sale 

Mini Hike 
3.5 itoraepo 
$126.00 
W4-7S74 



Mud<t Wanted 

KKMAi.K, must t>e pholoRenlc 

(iood pay. No porno. 

Send picture and qualiflcations lo 

514 W Maude Ave. 

Arlinitton Heights. Ill 6O0O4 



fWM UOMASS. Tt. 
lOISTilOUt AHD lOWOr* IVIITOMf SHOULD SAVOI 
THIS SAit fVIMT! IT SHOULD APfiAL MOT OMIT TO 
THOSI WHO WINT TO SCHOOL IN THI IS. BUT TO OTHIS 
A6fS AS WILL -■ 

THE WILDEST. FUNNIEST. RAUNCHIEST EVENING 
YOU'VE EVER SPENT IN THE THEATRE. I LOVED IT' 

HOV LiONARO. 1RIBUNI: 




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fur 



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TIMETSAT BOX OFFICE &IY MAIL 

ffitloMHll«Mrwaad. » t a» w p« d tii ii ny a^ ii M tl if 
•«n>T nrrf*' until <• StACKSTONf THf ATSf . SO 
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BOXnfFICi OPfN 
lO'iPM SUN lOfiFVI 
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WrinTlCKETRON 



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Men ttyg TWt * ** ^ 
^fi ond Sof ty»^ 8 30 



Wed Motinee* ? PM 
Sof MotKwei 3 P M ' 



OWCH 



I 



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lii BAIC 
M00^6 50 



M 90 7 50 



$7 50 5 90 



?nd BAIC J 



:>5 00 



"5155- 



M^O 



nrfTJnrriTT: 



SUNDAY MATINEES AT 3 P M 

SAME PRICES AS TUe& THURS 



I>oe Hertschel 

Coord, of Women's Programs 
or home .192-74.<>2 
A« part of the women's program, 
we are offering child care during 
xpecifled times for women ( or men ) 
with preschool children. We have 
space available on W & F morn- 
ings from 9 - 11:50 a.m. at 50 
cents an hour. .Supervision is un- 
der the direction of a trained pre- 
school teacher and it is not Just 



babysitting. 

I'm eager to let Marper students 
know about this additional child 
care facility, at>d even though per- 
haps it will help some whose sched- 
ules include VV & F classes. 

Please call me if you have ques- 
tions or want more info. .Students 
wishing to enroll their children 
should also call me. It is rrat nec- 
essary for the child to l>e there all 
3 hrs. of both days. 



PUBLIC StSSIONS EVERY DAY 

C/fiss irssons fo» a// Aqcs 884 1 } /O 



id/ield. 



ce 



202 S. Cook St. 



Harrington 



DARKENS 



FOR. 



BUZZARD-OUNHEAD $KI$ 



Before you buy 

Auto Insuranc* 
Call 495-0648 

Good Student discount ' Motorcycles oil CC's 
• Driver training credit ' Finondol Responsibility 

• 20% Savings ^or faculty 

Bradley/Bradley Agency Insurance Inc. 



L 



"•CW^™™"*"*-*- -■i«~- 



. iiajC Wii Ti iliii' r" "- 



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"H/1?BINGER 



William Rainey Harper College, Algonquin and Roselle Roads, Palatine. Illinois 60067, 312-397-3000 



Vol. 7. No. 6 



October 23.1973 



Homecoming to present a variety of octivities 



"Homecoming" as cele- 
brated in institutions of ed- 
ucation has stood for a time 
when alumni return to their 
alma mater for a nostalgic 
get-together with their old 
teachers and friends who 



they've somehow been out of 
touch with. 

More than two thousand 
alumni, parents, and 
friends are expected to hit 
Harper College on Satur- 



Dispute between Harper and 
maintenance staff continues 



The dispute between Har- 
per College and its Main- 
tenance workers continues. 

Contract negotiations 
have been going on between 
Local 1 1 of the Service Em- 
ployees International Un- 
ion, and the Harper College 
bargaining team since .lune 
18. Up to this point, these 
negotiations have failed to 
produce a contract. 

According to Mr. Wil- 
liam Von Mayr, both sides 
appear to be bargaining 
in good faith. When aslted 
the general question of how 
the negotiations were going, 
he answered, "We have 



agreed with them on alot 
of things. We have given, 
and they have given." 

The original Union de- 
mands were for a 10% in- 
crease in pay, and a change 
to the grievance procedure. 
Also disputed was the right 
for Union members to have 
Union dues deducted from 
thei r checks. 

Ahho, Von Mayr doesnot 
think that a strike is in the 
offing, a strike could result 
in the stopping of shipments 
to the college by Teamsters 
Union members who would 
|x)ssibility honor the strike 
lines. 



day, October 27 for the third 
annual homecoming. 

Homecoming festivities be- 
gin with a footbal 1 game at 
1:30 p.m. The Harper 
Hawks will take on the Oak- 
land Raiders of P'arming- 
ton,Michigan. Thegamewill 
be held in the Fremd High 
School stadium on Quentin 
Road in Palatine. 

A caravan built by the 
cheerleading and Pom Pon 
Squads to anticipate spirit 
will accompany the team on 
the way to the game. 

A concert will follow after- 
wards featuring Karl 
Scruggs in the College Cen- 
ter Lounge at 8 p.m. Ad- 
vance tickets are $2.00 for 
students with I. D. and $2.50 
for the community. 



[ 



OH, 60b, GIVE fAE TWE 
STRE.K&TH TO K»V.\. 
THOSE MOTMERSI 




§i®§[J5 



Gala Homecoming Edition 



Chantry appointed as 
director of computer services 




By RONALD POREP 

Robert W. Chantry, the col- 
lege's new director of com- 
puter services, is a man 
whom every college student 
should know about. 

Chantry, appointed to his 
directorship over the sum- 
mer, controls every aspect 
of your life at Harper. 

"We do many things here 
for students that they are 
most likely not aware of. We 
grade most of your tests, 
maintain your student file, 
help you fix your class 
schedule at registration, and 
many other things. We arc 
the department in the college 
where everything comes to- 
gether from most other de- 
partments," explained 
Chantry. 

Students should n<^* 
worry 'oo much about 

the computer service depart- 
ment as it is Tn good hands 
with this director. V 

Chantry started in conv' 
puters at United States 
Steel under a two-year train- 
ing program that took him 
into every part of the vast 



Gary, Indiana executive 
complex. After testing Chan- 
try in all of the different 
areas, U.S. .Steel decided he 
would be best for them in 
computer operations and let 
him manage systems analy- 
sis and cost operations for 
two years before he moved 
on. 

In .July 1961, Chantry be- 
came the computer systems 
manager for Presbyterian- 
St. Luke Hospital. He help- 



ed install and program one 
of the first Honeywell 200 
computer systems there and 
coordinated all computer 
services for the complex 
medical center. 

In 1966. Chantry became 
director of information ser- 
vices at Kvanston Hospital 
where he controlled all com- 
puter information for the 
hospital. He held this job 

(Turn to page 2) 




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H/1RBINGER 



October 23, 1973 



Bluegrass comes to Harper 



Earl Scruggs, America's 
foremost banjo picker, 
brings his electrified blue- 
grass band to Harper Col- 
lege's homecoming on Satur- 
day, October 27, in the 
College Center Lounge The 
starting time is 8 p m , and 
the public is invited to at- 
tend. 

Billed as "Earl Scruggs 
Revue/' the group features 
Scruggs' sons Gary, Randy 
and Steve on guitars, har- 
monica and vocals with Josh 
Graves on Dobro guitar, and 
Jody Maphis on drums 

Scruggs, originator of the 
three- finger style of picking 
the fjye-string banjo, is con- 
sidered the greatest banjoist 
in the country today He 
began playing banjo at uge 
four. 

Each member of tht- group 
is given an opportunity to 
solo but nevvr at the ex- 
pense of the lolai group 
sound. 

Scrniggs is probably best 
known for his song f'-oggy 
Mountain Rd .ikdawn " which 
was the bacKrrriund music 
for the nK>> i Koimie and 



he wroU' i:.. r. onUi! in 
1948 

Homeconiiiiii; ueckt'iul .ic " 
tivities begin vviih .i )• t ii>.iii 
game at 1 .')() p m .< i o.iK 
land Cullegi- ol iannin^ioi.. 
Michigan The game vmiI be- 
held in thf i rrniti Mi^li 
School stadiuni on Qiantin 
Road in Palatine 

The Bill Quuti-nj.in concert 
which was scheduled for Fri- 



day, October 26, has been 
cancelled. It will be re- 
scheduleu for January 4, 
1974 

Advance tickets for the 
"Earl Scruggs Revue" are 
$2 00 for students and $2 50 
for the community. Prices at 
the door on the night of the 
concert are $2.50 for stu- 
dents and $3.00 for thecom- 
munity. 



Creativity souglit for 
"Point of View" 



Clyde. It w.i 



first sbofi! 



l_AWReMCC R. Kici. 

PHOTOGRAPHER 



asB-sats 




By RICHARD KUSNIEREK 

Are you seeking for recog - 
nition of your heretofore un- 
tapped creative utlent'i' Ifyou 
are, your ship Iws come in 
and is presently docrked in 
"F' Building on (he third 
floor The iianii- of yuurship 
is POINT OF VU:W 

POINtAoF VIEW is seek- 
ing people^v^'ith talent or 
even think that they might 
have talent It's Harper's 
literary magazine that is 
published twice a year. Win- 
ter and Spring, at the end of 
the semester This literary 
publication is the vehicle 
open to any students full or 
part time who have original 
ideas that they want to put 
in graphic or literary form 

Ms Betty Beery is the 
captain and she definitely 
wants to see more student 
creativity exhibited. She 
believes that there are vast 
quantities of untapped talent 



^UBLSCRITGGS 



(Cont from Page 1) 

for seven years before com- 
ing to Harper. 

"I see Harper as an op- 
portunity for professional 
and personal growth. It al- 




Dyf^AMlTE EVEM^G WEAR 



Long, flowing & daring 

Lurex, velveteens & 

crepes w/ sequins 

FLASHY LUREX TOPS 

satin & velour go-withs 

SWEATERS GALORE 

This is only a peek 
Therm arm lots, lots morml 





("itrvi 
Pal Rone 



I 



OPK\ SIIM>AYS 

opt-n 7 (liivs a wei'k 

MANIC I RING 



ng N' Set B«o.>«r Sat.i« .« 
INTERNATIONAL VILLAGE 

ftt'molly Clipper* 

INTKOOUCKS 

rsunaltzed Hvuuty Scrvicv 
skilled Fjcptricnced Heaulicians 
SuKTtte (manager) 
and 




Drhhir 

Pa Hie 

1220 AK.ONOl IN RI). 
M MAlMRiRG 

<i«ll for appointment 397-0990 



' ^i^»^ ^i^^^^i m t^0^0t^t0^0^0^0^m 



caJSuialcxjrner 



Design Your Ring. 

Jus; Decause n s your love. 

and your day, 
make it your very own ring 




sonata 






Choose the band, the finish, the setting 
And it sail yours. 
Sonata ' 

Lets you be you. 

Flaherty Jewelers 

2 .North Dunton 
Ariin»!t«>n Mts . |!|. 

253-4690 




at Harper. Even tho you 
might not have any talent in 
these related fields but want 
to get involved, you can join 
the Student Selection Com- 
mittee Just contact Ms. 
Beery, F334B or the divi- 
sion office. F35I between 
November 16-30. 

Whatever road you want 
to take, you won't go wrong. 
This is the chance to see 
your talent in print The 
deadline for entry is Novem- 
ber 16, 1973. If you do sub- 
mit an essay, poem or any 
piece of literature, you will 
be requiredVto sign a re- 
lease paper.^Any additional 
information can be found by 
contacting Ms Beery, F334B 
or Division Office, F 351 
They want interested people 
and talented people This 
may be the only opportunity 
you have to explore your 
creative mind Take a chance 
and find out what it's worth 



Chantry named 

so has a high potential in 
the educational field and 
it can teach me much as 
well as I can aid it the 
same," stated Chantry. 

F*or you lovers of statis- 
tics. Chantry was born on 
September 3. 1935. He lives 
in Arlington Heights with 
his wife, Grace, and three 
boys and two g^irls. 

The computer services di- 
rector has.no pets, but does 
have a passionate interest 
in a 1962 MGA 2-sealer con- 
vertible which he drives or 
works on in his spare time. 

But Chantry is a deflnite 
man"*to know for adminis- 
trators, teachers and gener- 
al members oflhecommun- 

ity. 

Chantry wants the Harf)€r 
computer to benefit the en- 
tire community surround- 
ing the college. Already the 
computer is used to aid stu- 
dents and teachers in set- 
ting up tough class assign- 
ments. 

"I do not see why this 
could not be done in the near 
future. We do not, however, 
have any deflnite plans we 
can release right now 
though," explained Chan- 
try. 

The next time the 
computer goofs up your 
class schedule, paycheck, or 
tests, do not blame Robert 
Chantry, as your teacher 
and the machine probably 
goofed it up, but send some 
praise his way when things 
go' right with the machin*-, 
which, is more often than you 
might think. 



Oct. 23, 1973 



OUTPUT- 



» 



It is understandable that 
Atty. Gen. Elliot Richardson 
asked that compassion be 
shown for Spiro Agnew be- 
cause he had "rendered a 
high service by resigning 
and relieving the nation of a 
long and potentially dis- 
astrous period of anguish." 
Richardson is a decent man 
and Agnew has had much 
disgrace . And we agree with 
him. But the scope of the 
matter should not be forgot- 
ten. After all, Spiro Agnew is 
guilty of son;^ of the worst 
crime that anyone that has 
ever held a high office has 
been charged with. Surely 
this is a man that had no 
right in an office that holds 
to much public trust, after 
all isn't this the man that 
has to lake over the office of 
president in an emergency? 
The people for whom we are 
really sorry are the ones who 
believed Spiro in his never 
ending attacks on the Justice 
Department and the press. 



He can not blame news leaks 
for the trouble he is in. It 
was his own dishonesty that 
got him into this. 

This reporter and staff of 
the Harbinger cannot for- 
get the attacks leveled 
against George McGovern 
and Thomas Kagleton by the 
Nixon re-election commit- 
tee during the *72 election. 
Then the issue was that of 
some psychological treat- 
menffh the mid-sbcties. There 
was no criminal action in- 
volved. It is no wonder that 
Spiro had nothing to say 
during that time, his con- 
science was too guilty. And 
isn't it surprising that Pres. 
Nixon not only had no 
knowledge of this in '68 but 
did not find outuntil he had 
served in office for 5 years? 

But now it is time to get 
a man into the position that 
Agnew held that will restore 
dignity and honesty to the 
2nd most important office in 
the country. 



We welcome and encourage letter<i to 
the editor. They are subject t«» editing 
and condensation to meet space and 
style requirement!)!, and each must 
bear the writer's Kignalure and ad- 
dre**. Names may be withheld from 
publication al the writer's request, 
but signed letters will take precedence. 






J£ 



H/4RBINGER 




Kditor-in-chief 
Managing Kditor 
lousiness Manager 
News Editor 
Features Kditor 
Activities Kditor 
Sports Kditor 
Cartoon Kditor 
f'holo Kditor 
Photographers: 



v\ 



Diane DiHartolomeo 

Donn Lynam 

Gary Zdeb 

Ronald Porep 

Ron Zoberis 

Heidi Johnson 

Phil Hattaglia 

Dennis Murray 

L. R. Kiel 

Greg Conway. Paul Cord, Ken 

Kissam, Jim Moy, Mike Wellman 

and Chuck Zemeske 



Contributing Staff 
Mary Heth ( hristy, Dave Gordon. Frank McGovern. Sue 
Pollack. Steve Schlosser, K. K. Sinnott, Garriic White. Bill 
Whitehead George Polales III, Rich Kusnierek 
Advisor - Mr. Sturdevant 

The HARBINGER is the student publication for the 
Harper College campus community, published weekly 
except during holidays and mid-terms. All opinions ex- 
pressed on the editorial page or in the columns are 
those of the writer, and are not necessarily those of the 
college, its administration, faculty or student body. 

For information on advertising, rates and publica- 
tion schedule, call or write Harbinger Business Of- 
fice. 

William Rainey Harper College. Algonquin and 
Roselle Rds.. Palatine. Illinois 60067. Phone num- 
ber 397-3000. ext. 272 and 460. 



Tf 



H/IRBINGER 



Page 3 




"HO COMTFJ r/ 



INPU 



To M Chauvinist 

I ask you why'' Do your 
glands rule your life"' How 
can you think of human be- 
ings in terms of money spent 
and effort expended'' 1 agree 
that it is an unfair practice 
for you to always have to 
pay. but you may have to 
lower your standards in re- 
gards to where to go, etc , 
since we. on the average 
make about a third of the 
money that you do 

Why is the image of a 
female human being plant- 
ing trees or engaging in 
athletic activity repugnant to 



- Pigkt nbntted - 

you? You find satisfaction in 
these pursuits, so why should 
they be denied to us'' Per 
sonally. Ithink that you might 
be sexy in a pink chiffon out- 
fit 

In what way is it easy to 
be a woman in this society? 
W'ho is it that really dew>s 
the catering'' Who i.v condi- 
tioned from linn of birjh lo 
spend the u^ of Iwr' life 
catering to mal«- needs * 

Perhaps it would btM-asier 
to forget thp rllfhfs nid tlie 
jockeying for >i.iius rtiid (he 
roles and the gamo.s but 
just relate tu one another 



as fellow human beings We 
will willingly come off the 
pedestal (great viewupthere 
bit nothing to do') if you 
will open your eyes and see 
us as we really are- fellow 
members of the species 
Homo sapiens. 

And don't give me that 
"headache " line 

S. Lee Sloan 



Dntm whh Apathy 



Last week an article en- 
titled "What Difference Does 
It Make? " appeared in the 
Harbinger In it. the author. 
G E White, listed thirty- 
one selected excerpts from 
the statements made by Stu- 
dent Senate Candidates 

I, personally, was pleased 
to see a student that was 
willing to express a per- 
sonal opinion - although 
it was derogatory 

The Student Senate needs 
feedback from the student 
body I invite G E White 
and the entire student body 



to express their thoughts on 
the Senate, either in this 
column, at the Senate meet- 
ings, or in the Student Ac- 
tivities Office In A 336 If 
we are to function as repre- 
sentatives, we need to know 
what you think You do - - 
don t you'' 

I would also like to 
"'thank ' the student body for 
the fantastic " voter turn- 
out A loLai of 2^H. based 
on an tniolltnunt of 8.000, 
about 3 2', 



Rii 



l.i'v 



0bJ9€fS ft 

compti preocAfiif 

-As a student <>f Harper 
College and as a taxpaying 
citizen of a country which 
incorporates the policy of 
separation of church and 
state, I heartily object to 
the use of Harper school 
grounds by a proselytizing 
(converting) religious group 
which displfikjs itself In the 
manor of a business sales 
organization in the student 
lounge 

There are appropriate 
places for all sorts oftnings 
in our multiplistic society, 
bil a publicly supported col- 
lege is not the appropriate 
place for religious solicita- 
tion. 

Mrs. E. M. Levin 



1 



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Page 4 



T€ 



H/1RBINGER 



Oct. 23, 1973 



Homecoming: A bridge between present and post 

Who is William Rainey Harper? 



Just once, at the start of 
each year, the opportunity 
presents itself to answer a 
question that has'been oc- 
casionally asked in these 
parts Who the heck was 
William Rainey Harper? 

Dr Harper was the found 
ing president of the Univer 
sity of Chicago, and at the 
turn of the century was one 
of the original advocates of 
the Junior College concept. 
William Rainey Harper help- 
ed found the nation's first 



Junior College in Joliet. 

Harper was appointed 
president of the University 
of Chicago at the young age 
of thirty -six As an enter- 
prising college president 
who did not hesitate to pluck 
the best men from other 
colleges for his own faculty. 
Dr. Harper has been 
described as a Captain of 
Industry type of education- 
al leader 

Harper College is part <rf 
the new and expanded sys- 



tem of Junior Colleges 
rapidly taking shape 
throughout Illinois In gen- 
eral, the establishment and 
expansion of the two - year 
type of college Harper 
represents was set forth in» 
master plan adopted eight 
years ago by the Illinois 
Legislature 

The emergence of tWs new 
type of two-year college is 
perhaps the most important 
educational development in 
the state's history 



A third objective of the 
new two-year college con- 
cept is to offer an educa- 
tional resource to the com- 
munity Such a resource 
s er ves both the desires of the 
adult community to expand 
their knowledge and aware- 
ness, and the more specific 
needs of the inunediate busi- 
ness community. 

As you become accustom- 
ed to your surroundings at 
Harper, watching the bull- 



dozers landscape out the 
window, you can reflect that 
the two • year college has 
evolved a long way from 
William Rainey Harpers 
original Junior College in 
Joliet And you get the feel- 
ing this is only the begin- 
ning 

One problem of a new 
two-year college is to broad- 
cast an image that more truly 
depicts its obiecti^es and 



^ 



urn to page 10) 



Harper digs into future 



Three hundred people, 
dignitaries. college offi- 
cials, faculty members, and 
onlookers braved the wind 




a nd cold for the Harper Cam 
pus groundbreaking 

This was the scene on 
Oct 8. 1967 at Roselle and 
Algonquin roads John Haas, 
president of the Harper 
College Board of Trustees, 
acted as master of cere- 
monies Donald Rumsfeld, 
then congressman from the 
13th district presented a 
flag to Mr Haas that ^wr1. 



flown over the nation s cap 
ital for the college Then 
Dr Robert E Lahti spoke 
At this point a chrome plat- 
ed shovel was used to turn 
over the first shovel of dirt 
and mix soil from the Uni- 
versities of Chicago. Mus- 
kingum, and Yale These 
were the three colleges Wil- 
liam Rainey Harper worked 
at and helped advance 




Dr. Lahti mixm soil 



Enrollment grows over the years 



By JIM MOY 



Dr. FiNchrr breakn ground. 



William Rainey Harper 
College first opened its 
"doors" to students on Sep- 
tember 13. 1967 The 
■'doors " consisting of some 
trailers parked out back of 
Elk Grove High School Har- 
per opened in "67 with a 



faculty of about 40 instruc- 
tors, and no campus The 
temporary facilities at Elk 
Grove were to be used until 
the present campus was 
completed in 69 

In 1967 Harper had 860 
full time students enrolled 
and 90 part time students, a 



Borelli projects activities changes 



When I ni" ilort'lli. Siu 
dent Actlvi;:rs Advisor, 
came to H.ir|KT In July «.f 
1968 he walii givrn a position 
that had never be««n filled 
before He was given a free 
rein as far .is ih»Ml»'»u!op 
meni.ifafHu prngrain ig fr>ii 
cerned Today Harper has 
one of the best on campus 
programs around. 

Frank Borelli graduated 
from Univ of Miami with a 
combined degree in Psychol 
ogy and Soc Science He 
then went on to Southern 
Illinois Univ to obtain his 
masters degree in Student 
Personnel Administration 
He wen to the State College 
of Buffalo. NY asAssistant 
Dean of Students for 2 years 
and on to Bemidji State Col- 
lege for three years before 
coming to Harper in 1968 
When he came here he began 
a program to serve the total 



student population and the 
program has been expanding 
ever since 

Recently Mr Borelli has 
noticed a shift in the stu- 
dent body and its effect on 
student activities When he 
came to Harper there were 
more full time students than 
Pdrt lime Now just the op 
poKiie is true "There will 
be an increase of day time 
activities and more mini 
courses offered He also 
added "the response to the 
mini courses has been ex- 
cellent, and because of it 
we will try to offer more 
audience participation in our 
activities 

Also there is presently a 
reexamination of student 
senate "We are looking into 
the possibility of having a 
total senate where the ad 
ministration, facully, - and . 
studont.s all sitdown together 
to talk aboiit prcit U m ; 



can lock forwarl lo un ev«r 
increasing amnii: • an<' inal 
ity in our siud«-t, \.- : i 
this and ncvi \ phi 



total of 1.564 compared with 
the 1.3.222 presently en 
rolled. In 67 the tuition rat<- 
*as $8 per semt'.sri- '-.fiir 
in district Toda> • • 
II ge student pays 
.semester and pays 
activities fees. 

The class of oo was the 
first graduating clais at 
Harper The cla.ss consisted 
of 114 students 91 of uhich 
lived in district Last year 
Harper conferr(>iiiu greesun 
stucfc-nts liie urud- 

uation was held at St Via 
tor High School St Viator 
then became the third school 



to lend its facilities to Har- 
per, the other two being Elk 
Grove and Forest View high 
schools 

When Harper opened in 67 
it had only 40 teachers to- 
day Harper has over .360 
part and full time teachers 

From its meager begin 
nlngs In "67 Harper College 
has grown at fantastic rates, 
with its enrollment growing 
in six years at an average 
of about 140^ per year This 
growth makes Harper one of 
the fastest growing junior 
colleges in the country to- 
day. 





Mr. Frank Borelli .six years 
ago when he entered his pos- 
ition. 



Dr. Lahti and Terry Babb Harper editor, pose with 
intercollegiate award. The Harbinger was the Hrst stu- 
dent activity cited at Harper. 



V 



Oct. 23, 1973 



T€ 



H/1RBINGER 



Page 5 



In 186L after touring the Union Army camps around Wasington D.C.. JuUa 
Ward Stowe wrote a poem that she thought would sound nice if it were to be sung 
to the tiuie of "John Brown's Body." James Russell Lowell, editor of the AUantic 
Monthly, published the hymn and named it the Battle Hymn of the Republic." 

In 1973. after looking back at the last decade and wondering just where the hell 
our world is headed, D. J. Gordon has written a poem of sacrilegious sarcasm he 
thinks would sound awful no matter what tune it was sung to. '\'our friends here at 
the Harbinger are publishing it and figure that you can call it whatever you want. 
They would just as soon ignore it. 

Mine eye s have seen the murder of a President and more, 

I have watched this country crumble from the ravages of war ^ 

Dr. King and Bobby Kennedy and oh so many more 

Our truth keeps marching on. 

People, people can you stand it 
People, people can you take it 
People, people can't you see it 
Our truth keeps marching on. 

You can watch it on the news show on y4ur television let 
You can hear it. you can taste it, you can even place a bet 
We all say wc reaUy care about it earnestly and yet 
Our truth keep* marching on. 

Baople. people can you stand it 
People, people can you take it 
People, people can't you see it 
Our truth keeps marching oa 

We are like the Roman Empire, and we're headed for a fall 
We are Uke the Jews at Dachau, we are up against the wall 
We are Uke the way we made ourselves, the way we heard the call 
Our truth keeps marching on 

People, people can you stand It 

People, people can you . • 

People, peopte ' 




^ 



My CouNTRy 'tis o^ the«, 

SwfET Land of 



ff 



J 



nip 




IF YOi; PLAN TO GRADUATE AT THE END OF 
THE FALL SEME.STKR. PLEASE CONTACT THE 
ADMLSSIONS OFFICE TO OBTAIN A PETITION 
FOR GRADUATION AND FILE THE FORM WITH 
THE ADMISSIONS OFFICE AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION. CONTACT THE 
ADMISSION'S OFFICE. .397 3000. EXT. 208. 



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Page 6 



f€ 



H/1RBINGER 



Oct. 23. 1973 



GILENDylR 
OFE/ENTS 

On Campus — 

Concert— Harper College Community Orchestra, under 
the direction of George Malcas. (-oncert will include 
works by Beethoven, Mozart, Prokofieff, and the Su- 
zuki Violin Students playing Vivaldi and Seitz. 
Oct. 29, 8:00, College Center. Free. 

Homecoming Concert, featuring THK EARL 
SCRUGGS RKVITK, is Oct. 27, 8:00. Advance tic- 
kets on sale in Student Activities Office, $2.00 with 
Harper I.D. $2.50 for community. Tickets at the door 
are $2.50 with Harper I.D. and $3.00 for the com- 
munity. 
^British Politics," lecture by Mr. Patrick Duffy, a mem 
ber of Parliament and the Labour Party. Oct. 26, 
2:0O^D213. 

Mini-Course in Handwriting Analysis. The sessions 
will outline whut the analyst looks for and how the 
findings are interpreted. Oct 23 & 25, 12:00-1:50, 
A241 -C 

Mini-Course— An introduction to Reliy Dancing, which 
will include background of the dance, basic dance 
movements and how it is taught in a dance class. A 
demonstration of the dance will be given. Leotards 
and tights are preferred. Enrollment limited to 25 
students. Oct. 30 & Nov. 1, 12:00-1:50. A 241 - 
AB& C. 
Student Senate Mtg.. Thurs., 12:30, A 241 A & B. 

Ski Club, Tues., 12:15. D231. Rep.from Hobbit Inter- 
national, will speak on Squaw Valley Trip Dec. 16- 
21 at 2:30. 

Seekers. Thurs., 12:00-1:30. 227. 

Harper Players, Tues.. 12:30. F 304. 

Coffee House featuring Janet and Judith Robinson 
and friends. Oct. 23. 

Bill Quateman Concert. Fri.. Oct. 26. has been can 
ceUcd. 

Dance- 
Ballet West U.S.A. with Jacques D'Ambolse. Auditor 
ium Theatre, Oct. 25 & 26, 8:00. Ph. 922-2110. 

Don Rickles and Enro .Stuarti. Oct. 26 thru N'«.\ 4 

Mill Run Theatre. Ph. 298-2170. 
Frank Zappa. Auditorium Thealfe. Oct. 31. at 7:00. 

Ph. 922-2110. 
The King Family. Oct. 27. 8:00. Auditorium Theatrt 

Ph. 922-2110. 
Mahavishnu Orchestra. Auditorium Theatre. Oct. 30. 

8:00. Ph. 922-2110. 

Lectures — 
"The Archaeology of I'eru." sponsored by the Chi- 
cago Archaeological Society. Speaker will be Dr. 
Francis GroUig, chairman, anthropology depart 
ment, Loyola V. Oct. 28, 8:00 p.m.. Chicago Acad- 
emy of Sciences. I^h. 38 1 -8475. 



SRGSB 3RW6 ■ RASPBGRR06S 



No doubt many students 
already have this disc spin- 
ning constantly on their turn- 
tables. 

It is in high hopes that I 
might spare the rest of you 
thai I am penning this grim 
report on the current drought 
of musical taste in the world 
today. 

The Rasberries are a for- 
mula 

There is the record jacket 
on which is employed the 
gimmick One of their al- 
bums smelled like raspber- 
ries. 

This one doesn't Rather 
the concept was to gra- 
phically carve the shape of 
the record cover so that it 
gives the impression of a 
bushel of raspt)erries 



t was not tooled by this 
device, but ihun It holds up 
fairly well wh» ri coinpared 
to the cover thai snit:lls Hkh 
raspberries Tlicre :;• •! 
course, iiicluii' 
package a r-( «■; . , 
tains nine soiii'< 

The Raspt/ei) ii.-,, 
way. have [•\ , 
sounds liha- liei"..'.!!! 
that the onl\ . i!ii r. 
content beiw- • i. ;' i *> • 
sounds is i\u- < \ i :r . < a 
they rfre recordeJ ^lonj .ind 
hissy. respec«i\ elv) 

I do not completely ugree 

First, the opening cut, 

Tonight, " is (l«siined lo be 

the theme song for all of the 

after -homecoming activities 

that will lake place ihis fall. 

It deserves the title 



The song has tremendous 
drive and a lyric that coun- 
sels the girl to go ahead. 

The next cut (which works' 
in beautifully with the first 
as far as album program- 
ming) is a little softer and 

(Turn to page 7) 



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October 23, 1973 



H 



H/4R6INGER 



Page 7 



Bikf lives revjeweif 



Raspberries 



By CHRISTOPHER LIMBER 

The relevance of review- 
ing a show that's already 
left the Chicago area can be 
justified many ways, one of 
which Is to praise the Ar 
lington Parli Theatre, in par 
ticular David Lonn. Man- 
aging Director, for arrang- 
ing for Brief Lives to be 
shown even for a short run. 
Brief Lives is a Royal 
Shakesperian Company pro- 
duction, and lived up to its 
credentials The show Is 
adapted from the memoirs, 
letters, and jottings of John 
Aubrey, a biographer and 
ailhor born in 1626 

Aubrey's life was spent 
generously collecting schol- 
arly information and scan 
dalous gossip for aad atwut 
other people His last work. 
Brief Lives, on which the 
show is based, was not pub- 
lished until after his death 
It was not recognized as a 
great biographical work until 
this century 

The play itself is set in 
Aubrey's apartment in 1697. 
the year of his death The set 
was built over a section of 
seats in-the- round- theatre 
with a small acting area on 
the actual center stage The 
audience was invited to sit 
■ "on stage. " s ince it w^s not 
utilized, and see the perfor- 
mance at very close range 

Ray Dotrlce. who played 
Aubrey in this one man show, 
spent three hours a night ap- 
plying a complex make-up 
It was believable to every 
detail Dotrlce treated the 



audience for two and. one 
half hours (not leaving the 
stage for intermission) with 
the life and observations of 
John Aubrey; telling stor- 
ies about his friends, the 
court of England, and other 
notables like Sir Walter 
Raliegh and Charles II The 
most charming and touching 
stories were those of him- 
self as a youth and as an old 
dying man. 

Dotrlce achieved an ex- 
ceptionally high level (rf 
theatrical communication 
never allowing a moment 
on stage without a meaning- 
ful movement, pause, or 
word. His characterization 
in this one man show was an 
ultimate in acting style and 
grace, speaking directly to 
the audience and exchanging 
words, and laughter, with 
acting precision hebridgeda 
300 year time span between 
playwright and audience 
Only Aubrey's life and 
stories existed during this 
remarkable performance 

Dotrice was superb, alive, 
full of surprises Probably 
the best actor to grace the 
Arlington stage this season 
The play speaks of history, 
the humor in old age. and the 
unending process of human 
learning All of ouremoiions 
were touched We exper- 
ienced laughterthat hurt, and 
real tears before the play 
ended 

Lets hope Ray Dotrice and 
Brief Lives will return for a 
much longer run, and thank 
Arlington for sharing it wjih 
us 



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(From page 6) 

less ambitious. thanii(|e first. 

It also has a Iwtenable 
melody and some fine coun- 
try fiddle playing whichwill, 
naturally, disqualify it for 
AM radio play 

From here thealbum slips 
i nto the old mid- sixties cate - 
gory of filler material 

Or perhaps one tires eas- 
ily of a group that writes 
and plays only one topic, a 
topic which, as universal as 
it is, should be given a rest 
once in a while. 

I realize that I may be a 
trifle hard on the Raspber- 
ries. They do have a tight 
style of playing and their 
singer is becoming more of a 
stylist than his original Paul 
McCartney imitations 

But somehow they don't 
seem to belong on albums 
Their material Is just too 
limited lo stand the endur- 
ance of 40 minutfes straight 
listening 



Harper players 



F. K Simioit 



By STEVE SCHLOSSER 

Theatre is alive and well 
and living at Harper. In the 
forms of television, original 
productions and children s 
plays, this season promises 
to be an exciting one for the 
Harper Plavers 

The student headed group 
assisted by faculty advisor 
Russ Stevens includes among 
their rosier vijjeo tapes used 
for teaching «^ in such 
classes as Psychology, Soc- 
iology and Acting and an 
annual childrens play pro- 
duced at various grade 
schools and here at Harper 
As president, Larry Andres 
states. 'Our main purpose 
is to keep an interest in the 
theatre, not only at Harper, 
but within the community as 
well." 

The organization's up- 
coming one -act productions. 



December 6 and 7 include 
Ray Bradbury's The Won- 
derful Ice Cream Suit. Wood- 
y Allen's Death Knocks and 
Count Dracula and an ori- 
ginal play entitled Braille by 
Lane Bateman. All produc- 
tions are student acted, 
directed and produced, and 
admission is free to all Har- 
per students; without ID is 
$1.00. The Harper Players 
meet every Tuesday in F342 
and all interested students 
are encouraged to attend or 
call the Players office, F304 
(448) 397-3000. 



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Features 

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^•tiiil (•• k$im»»4 flit* 

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The newcM addttton to the 
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Do It tr.tqclher 

Pick fci^m the world s 

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with 

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GUITARS 
ARE LIKE 
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NOTW^ 
ARE THf 
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/ 



^ 



'> 



V 



Page 8 



T€ 



H/1RBINGER 



Oct. 23,1973 



T€ 



GRAND OPENING SALE! 



SALE ENDS OCTOBER 31, 1973 



1 .51* I 



'( 



/Tt'lh 



^, C ••• '^"■ 



SAVE OVER $100 ON THIS PIONEER/BSR/CSS SYSTEM! 

PIONEER'S SX424 AM/FM Stereo Receiver i$ proof positive that stereo on a 
limited budget doesn't have to mean limited stereo sound. In a handsome 
package of quahty circuitry and reasonable price, the SX424 odea 36 wattt 
of continuous power output, very sensitive FM reception, a wide linear type 
dial Kale for fine FM tuning, and highly respectable specifications both for 
the FM tuner section and the audio section. The regular price for theSX424 
alone is $200. 

The CSS 802 Two Way Air Suspension Speaker Systems incorporate an 8" 
woofer for smooth bass response and a aparate 2% " tweeter for smooth, 
transparent highs, with dispersion over a Mitdfl listening area. Manufacturers 
recommended list price is S 120 per pair. 

The BSR 310AX Automatic Record Changer features low mass counter 
weighted tone arm, cue & pause control as well as ahti skate control. This $80 
package comes complete with base, dust cover and cartridge Save over $100 
now from manufacturers list price 



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WHILE THEY LAST' The SANSUI 1000X is the Sansui believer iKfJS? 
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measure up in completeness. So complete, in fact, the lOGOX has two tape 
monitor circuits which will enable you to record on two tape recorders 
simultaneously Other features include mam/remote speaker switching, 
loudness compensation, high filter and FM muting for interstation noise The 
Sansui 1000X alone sold for S329.00. 

The SCOTT S-15 10' 3 Way Speaker Systems, rated a "Best Buy" by a 
leading consumer maga/ine, offers smooth, wide range response with enough 
dispersion to fill the average si;e living room. Manufacturers list price is $240 
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The BSR 510AX Automatic Record Changer features a synchronous motor, 
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CHANDLER'S. INC. ANNUAL TEXTBOOK WAREHOUSE 
SALE-Our entire worehouse stock of over one million 
fextbooks-new ond used-both hardbound and paper- 
back-current editions ondout-of-prinfs -50%ormoreoH 
list price. CASH AND CARRY ONLY. All soles final. 
Monday thru Saturday, Oct. 29th to Nov. 3rd, 9 A.M. 
fo 5 P.M. Chandler's, Inc. Textbook Division, New lo- 
cation at 1019 University Place, Evanston, Illinois. 
One block South of Emerson and 1/2 block West off 
of Maple. Directly across from the Evanston city 
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page 9 



COLLEGE STUDENT'S POETRY ANTHOLOGY 
The NATIONAL POETRY PRESS 



announces Its 



* SPRING COMPETITION 

The closinic date for lt»e submission of manusrripts by Collexe StudenU is 



NOVEMBER 5 



A.\Y STl'DK.NT attendinK either junior or senior college is ellieible to submit his 
verse. There is no limitation as to form or theme. Shorter worlcs are preferred by the 
Board of Judses, because of space limitation. 

Kach poem must be TYPHI) or PRINTKD on a separate sheet, and must bear the 
.\AA1K and HOMK ADDRKS.S of the student, and the COLLKCK ADDRKSS as well. 

MANirSCRIPTS «houl«; be sent to the OKFICH OF THK PHKS.S 



NATIONAL POETRY PRESS 



3210 Selby Avenue 



'I 



Ml 




1968 Old* 442 

Kresh 4(K) CIB 
Custon paint 
AM, F.M stereo quad 
Too much tu list ■ 
$2.00<) 2.S5-3675 



ABORTION 
and planned parenthood info. 

FOR 
( HItACIO MKTftOPOI.ITA.\ 
ARtiA ( O.VVK.SIK.NT.S.W. • 
SIOK LOCATIO.N. 

PRIVATK 

( <»NFI1)K\TIAL 

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( OMPLKTK FACILITIES 

I K ENSKD PHYSICIANS 

PREGNANCY TESTING 

WITH IMMEDIATE RESIILTS 

LOW COST 
312 772 1151 or 772 1152 



Dial ■ Seereiwry 
893-3332 

Will type reports, thesis, resume, etc 
Special student rales. 



Earn Money 

Students, earn extra money 

selling ecology based 

Shaklce Products 

Earn up to $7 an hr. 

Call 35»0459. anrr 4:UU. 

Help Wanlrd 

- to run sound for 

Harper's Colfcehouses 

Tuesdays 11:30 am. -I:30p.m 

Contact: Hope Spruance. 

Student Activities Room A-336 

1967 Honda "305" 

Hardly used, laspeed 
lielglan Racer. Flaming red 
(;ary l-jti. 272 (after 12:00) 
or 272-4152 (Sundays) 



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Stereo L.P.'s $5.98 Retail 



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The ilpper left Bank 

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OffltOOOOTO 113 7' 






ISobbv ^ 

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Ask for Pal Walker 

Work on campus in 
Community Rrlalinns Ofllrr 
Typing & clerical duties 
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Est 266 Rm. A-323 



Info on placing rlassified ads- 
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page 10 



'^H/IRBINGER 



L 



Cross country wins fliirly sfiaight 



October 23, 1973 



By DIANE DiBARTOLOMEO 

Victory for Harpers' 
cross country team could- 
n't be sweeter these days. 
The Hawks have a reputa- 
tion for extending their long 




Tom Fath 



dual-meet winning streak 
and victories by Mike De- 
La Bruere, often whUe 
breaking a new course rec- 
ord. 

The repetition of these 
events could be seen in the 
Hawks' recent duel. They 
won 21-34 over a fme Oak- 
ton team to spread ,their 
streak to 30 straight! DeLa 
Bruere broke his own 
course record at Niles West 
High School. He ran 
20:45.6 for four miles, com- 
pared to his 20:54 last 
year. The Hawks had the 
top three places with Tom 
Fath taking second in 
21:17 and John Jones third 
21:28. Jim Simonik was 
•Ixth (22:35) and John 
Bone ninth (24:02.) 

Proud coach Bob Nolan 
said that even more import- 
ant than the streak and rec- 
ord was that the Hawks' 
are now 5-0 in the confer- 
ence. 

Harper wUl host Elgin 
and DuPage October 17, 



and will be in the DuPage 
Invitational Saturday, Oc- 
tober 20. We wish the 
Hawks' much success, as 
their future looks promis- 
ing. 



HAWKS SOAR 
45 TO 18 




Mike DeLa Bruere 



BIRDS OF REY 



By CHUCK ZEVISKK 

After Slaking Concordia a 
12 point lead in the first 
half, the brilliant combina- 
tion of an aggressive offense 
and stingy defease led by 
Ge(rffrey Bacon, the HAWKS 
came from behind to an- 
nhilate the Cougars. 4.'>-l8 

Harper got on the board 
late in the^ second quarter 
with 3 51 remaining in the 
half when Pat Demsey con- 
nected with Erwin Kim- 
fa rough for the first of two 
long pass plays in the game 
netting 42 yards. 

The well balanced power- 
house of Harper broke loose 
In the second half scoring 
14 points in the third quarter 
and 24 inthe fourth The first 
score of the third quarter 
came when Marty Williams 
went over from 1 yard out 
following a 45 yard pass to 
him Jim Leopardo took it 
from 2 yards out later inthe 
quarter making the score 21 - 



12 at the end of three. 

Highlighting the defensive 
attack was Geott Bacon 
IntercepUng 2 Concordia 
passes and one of these in- 

ui"Sf.?^°'^ resulted in a 
HAWK score. 

- The fourth quarter con- 
sisted of a variety of scor- 
ing involving the ground 
game, air attack, and finish- 
^g with a field goal Marty 
Williams scored forhis sec- 
ond time in the game, this 
time on a 45 yard run Kim- 
b rough was again the target 
for Demsey and this play 
resulted in a 65 yard touch- 
down play The last of the 
TD s came with 1 27 from 4 
yards out The final HAWK 
scon- «ainf ii n,,- f,r, ,1 
onds of piax w! . ,, 
Wilson drill.d u .», 
field goal, making lUv 
score 45-18 
SCORE BY QUARTER 
HARPER 

7 14 24-45 

CONCORDIA 

J2 6 0-18 



■ ■ . m 

.'. Mil 

itnal 



By GREG COIVWAY 

Five years ago Harper 
•tarled an athletic program 



in» is ir.R.H. 

(From page 4) 

function The two -vear col- 
lege today is quite a differ- 
ent thing from the Junior 
College of even a dozen years 
ago 

The two-year community 
college has been called "The 
New College • Followingthe 
educational philosophy out- 
lined by the Illinois State 
Legislature, the efforts 
of the State two-year col- 
lege system are directed at 
two primary objectives 

One objecUve is to crffer 
g reate r opportunl ty for high - 
er education to many thou- 
sands of high school grad- 
uates who are finding it in- 
creasingly difficult to either 
gain admission or to afford 
the traditional four - year 
colleges for their freshman 
and sophomore years 

The second major objec- 
tive d the two-year college 
is toprovide expanded facili- 
ties in occupational, techni- 
cal, and semi -technical 
fields chat can lead immed- 
iately to skilled job place- 
ment This objective helps 
meet the growing manpower 
^demands of hu.siness. indus- 
r^y. governmtM:t, and of im- 
portant tri.'-l;!.; . ', .,„(.h ,,^. 

hospimis 



with good coaches who nad 
•ome fine talent to work with. 
Not all of the tribulations 
are done for yet. 

" I'nder the circumstances, 
the athletic program has 
come a long way since we 
were started. But we must 
have something more to of- 
fer than just the classes to 



get people interested. Part 
of the problem is the lack of 
support frorr the student 
body, faculty and the ad- 
ministration. All they seem to 
give us is lip service." 

Looking forward to this 
year's Homecoming football 
game, it looks like for once 
in the last two years we will 
win it. 





Photo by Chuck Zemenke 



AlOOO I SEIF DEFENSE mKTT 

For Guys & Girls ^ih 

Have fun meet friends *-^T|//C 

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Pro black belt Instructor - L. Sachs 



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Before you buy 



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• Good sludent discount • Motorcycles all CC's 

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«r 



miv m m mm '" ly — SI — r*-:j- 



^ 



( 




)' 



Lahti pens Book 



Uses experience as guide 



By RICHARD KUSNIEREK 

The judicious manner of 
management on the college 
level thru innovation al tech* 
nlques is the highlight of 
a new book expected on 
the book stands soon. The 
author is none other than 
Harper's own President, Dr. 
Robert Lahti. 

In his new book. Dr. Lah- 
ti explains exactly how col- 
lege administrators can de- 
sign, implement and suc- 
1 cessfuMy use one such ap- 
proach in every aspect of 
college level management. 
Dr. Lahti has described how 
the implementation of basic 
principles can be applied 
to increase organizational 
efficiency, productivity and 
personal satisfaction of 



every employee from filing 
clerk to the president of 
the institution. 

The book's primary em- 
phasis states the need for 
management development. 
A complete program is de- 
signed for developing the 
managerial skills of aca- 
demics who are highly qual- 
ified but unfortunately are 
very often inexperienced. 
Because of his capacity as 
a community college pres- 
ident. Dr. Lahti has drawn 
examples in his book of 
the programs he instituted 
at Harper. These examples, 
in turn, have helped to add 
a dimension of consider- 
able value to his analysis. 
Because he has written his 
book in an easy and non- 



technical fashion, adminis- 
trators, trustees, graduate 
students and faculty mem- 
bers concerned with insti- 
tutional management can 
utilize his book as an easy 
reference. 

Dr. Lahti also has an ar- 
ticle in the October issue of 
Community and Junior Col' 
lege Journal on "Trustee 
Perforjpance Standards." 
(Another article In the 
same issue on Harper's ad- 
ministrative development 
model was written by Dav- 
id Groth, former Harf>er 
dean for continuing educa- 
tion. ) In other activity, Dr. 
Lahti earlier this year was 
named to the editorial advis- 
ory board of College and 
University Business. 




Pres. Lahti, Hagier's own Open Book. 



TE 



J wu.vc»j, x^uBtiicM. rres. L.anu, Magier's own Open Book. 

H/4RBINGER 



y 



William Rainey Harper College, Algonquin and Roselle Roads, Palatine, Illinois 60067, 312-397-3000 



Vol. 7. No. 7 



October 29,1973 



Block bustor recommendation 
suggests tuition be roised 



A new report that hasbwn 
getting a lot of national /at- 
tention lately is "The MVlt 
agement and Financing of 
Colleges" put out by the 
Committee for Fkonomic De- 
velopment; a private re- 
search group given to mak- 
ing recommendations on 
national policy. 

The report is over 90 
pages long and is loaded 
with safe harmless sugges- 
tions like "we recommend 
that each college and uni- 
versity establish a policy 
committee with responsib- 
ility to define the long 
range goals of the institu- 
tion and develop a strategy 
for guiding it in achieving 
them" 

The block buster recom- 
mendation, however, is 



taken up in 20 of the 90 
pages. The recommenda- 
tion, briefly, suggests that 
tuitions at colleges and 
universities, in particular 
public schools and two year 
colleges like Harper, be in- 
creased until students are 
paying 50 percent of the cost'' 
of their education directly 
through tuition. 

At fhe same time, the com- 
mission says that the 
amount of direct student 
aids, in the form of scholar- 
ships and loans, from the 
elimination of much of the 
direct federal aid that now 
goes to the schools instead 
of the students. 

The report already has 
produced howls of dismay 
from educators around the 
country. For example, the 



Harbinger Poll 

Do you favor impeochmant procaadings 
against Prasidant Nixon? 



Yas 



□ '^•n 



Drop your ballots oH in Harbinger office, 
Rm. A367. 



report says that using 1969- 
'70 averages, tuition would 
increase only $583 per 
student in the universities 
and $494 extra would be 
required from students in 
the four year colleges. 

I wonder if the experte 
realize ho"w much $500 can 
mean to a student in any 
income bracket. The report 
says that part of the extra 
would be taken up by schol- 
arships and loans, but do 
they know how difllcult it 
is to get a scholarship, as 
anyone who has filled out 
the "Parents' Confidential 
Financial Statement " can 
attest to. The federal loan 
program provides more 
help in the form of mon- 
ey that is easier to get to, 
but how many students are 
ready to take on the annual 
repaymentViUevels and the 
risk of incnring a large 
long term debt. 

A loan may still be the 
commission's answer but 
when you figure that the cost 
of attending a four year 
school in your home state 
can run more than $2500 

(Turn to page 2) 



Don't use our 
name in vain 



The passage of House Bill 
647 now changes all referen- 
ces in the statutes of "Junior 
college to community 
college 

Thus It is now proper to 
refer to the Iinnofs 
Community College BolTrd. 
and in speaking informally, 
to refet if» the state's ct)m- 
munil\ '>ntu<'.s. m>t junior 
collegi- 

And i< v\ ( r<' on style. 



the nani< of our school is 
William Kainiy Harper 
Colleg) i>r for short. Har- 
per ColltRe It is improper 
usage to refer In headlines 
or stories to Harper Junior 
Collegr or even Harper 
Commiiiinv College (how- 
ever. Harper community 
collegt' u.->ing the down style, 
could bi lorrect) 

Whllf lommunity"' isnot 
in our naim'. ii is in our 
mission 



WHAT DO YOU THINK? 




The words of the common man were voiced and viewed 
as seen atop a roof at Harper; workers laying a new 
roof put down their messi<ge loud and clear . . . 



-M 



-J 



) 



I 'l l( V 



/ 



r 



Page 2 



fC 



H/4RBINGER 



October 29, 1973 



By JIM MOY 



Free drugs available to students 



Harper's Health Service 
Center provides a myriad 
of servicefl and facilities free 
of charge to all Harper stu- 
dents, faculty and staff. 
Health Services, located 
in A362, next to the Counsel- 
ing Center, is open Mon- 
day through Thursday from 
8:30-10.00 andFridayfrom 
8:30-4:30. The Health Ser- 
vices provides treatment 



"^(^Sam^lh 




TODAY. IT'S 
STIU ONLY 



^fcgs/ 



BYHRING JEWELERS 
255 E. NW Hwy. 
Palatine, lU. 




GUITARS 
ARE LIKE 
PEOPLE 

NO TWf) 
ARt THE 
SAMt 



ch<K)SP a (JU'tif |h<t really 

Stup .n and ■ ^tmti' <njr 
Stnnqi tf, cirrHJafi- o«J» guita'v 



iif ■i.«' 




^Jf.i Jfloore 
Jnu'jic Cenler 



VVOODFIELDMALL 
SCHAliMBERG 

882 1434 
(intide Wurlil/crl 



for minor illnesses, such as 
asprins, cold capsules, Alka- 
Seltzer, and almost any 
other non-prescription drug 
that might be needed to help 
someone get through with a 
minimum of discomfort. 
Hefilth Services also pro- 
vides many other services, 
such as a bed if you're feel- 
ing tired or suffering from 
the "night before". If you 
are taking allergy shots. 
Health Services will prop- 
erly store and administer 



the medication for you, thus 
saving you the cost of see- 
ing a doctor to have it done. 
Health Services is headed 
by Mrs. Elizabeth McKay 
who, in addition to being a 
registered nurse, also has 
a master's degree in sociol- 
ogy. Full-time staff mem- 
bers are, Mrs. Rosemary 
Murray R.N., day nurse 
and in the evenings Mrs. 
Beverly Ofloy is available 
to help you. Part-time staff 
members are Mrs. (leorgia 



«obbv ^ 
ITIc Occ*s 

Oe«p-Pan Pizza 
Pitchers of Beer & Win* 

704 N. River RomI 
Mt. Prospect. III. 

Phone: 297-9520 




The Swing 'ff' Set Bcouty Soion .n 
INTERNATIONAL VILLAGE 




ty 



Caryl 
Pilt Rom 



OPFA SUNDAYS 

()j)cn 7 dii\s a witk 
MA MCI! RING 



fnpmolly (tlippprs 

INTROIU'CES 

'ersdiiali/td lUauty .Scr\ ici 
by skilled Hxpcricmcd Konuticinn.s 
SusHfe (mannger) 
and 






llehhu- 
Pattie 



la^l* AI.CON'Ql'I.N Rl>. 
>♦€ HAIMBIIRC. 

fittf for (ppoinHTK Til .197-0990 



^^^^*^*^M*^** 



Lock R.N., and Mrs. Eliz- 
abeth Elber RN. 

Every Tuesday and Fri- 
day, Dr. Marvin H.Mar- 
golis comes in from 12:00- 
2:00 and is avaUable for 
examinations, treatment 
and other services that can 
be provided by a general 
pracUoner. One of Dr. Mar- 
golis' services is emergency 
referral, which means if 
someone thinks that they 
have broken something they 
can be referred to the hos- 
pital, saving emergency 
room costs. 
Additional Services pro- 



vided by the Health Ser- 
vices are medical parking 
permits, group and individ- 
ual health counseling, stu- 
dent insurance plans, ab- 
sentee memos, and a kind 
ear to listen if you have 
a health related problem 
such as a physical handicap, 
drugs, VD, or pregnancy. 
All visits and treatment 
are kept strictly confidential. 

Health Servkes is an ex- 
cellent service provided to 
all students, faculty, and 
staff, but best of all it's 
free. 



Harper placement helps students 
with eye to future 




Somt Ki percent ot Har 
per College students hold 
doM'n a jobattendingclasses. 
and many of them receive 
help in locating positions 
through the college Office of 
Placemmt and Financial 
Aid 



Tuition hike 

( Cont from Pagr 1 ) 

a year the present time you 
can see how much a student 
can get in debt if the tui- 
tion went up $500. 

To show you how sharp 
the commission is check out 
this statement from the com- 
mission's report, "we are 
confident that middle and 
upper-income groups can 
and will pay larger shares 
of the college costs." 

Ufs hope that this re- 
port winds up like so many 
others do, filed away and 
forgotten. 



In some cases the job can 
make the difference In 
whether the individual c»«i 
continue in CoUege 



Mu<-h of the money earned 
by working students who at- 
tend Harper Col lege goes for 
upkeep of cars used for 
transportation to campus. 
Althoff says that other stu- 
dent eurnings are used for 
spending nxjney and school 
expenses 

The I lHc*fm«-nt and flnan 
cial ai*l oCfun. under the 
direction -if I red Vaisvil. 
helps tudi-iiis <4>tain em- 
ploymtnt arnf assists with 
applicHi:ons lor educational 
grants • '- iikins 

A wi.,. \ at iilv of full .iml 



part (I < 
listi'd 
which I' 
studen 

Thf , 
the ofh 
high H< 'vi 
dents. I 
stud«»n . 



lotis 
I !• HI r.s 
• info , 

M II , :il 
I • r 1 .| 
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kive li*n"n 
arv «>ffen«l 
iilinosi :in\ 

■•••I V Ul'.Snl 

'••n to .iifii 

•lllciif sti 
I • llarptr 

I -I <'kiiu 



HIA report 



( From page 8 ) 

ternativi' ,iro ilu.se havt 
been add. i! to rlif i:ihs. first 
as funds Imh oinr available 
MIsic hoiH's some day that 
the hooks AiillMinal! class 
room.s. w Ml,, iiii.s vuin t htlpj 
'•Of*s. vf least it I 
'»its off fhr chair ; 

llMtf 

U^'<\ I srom to In- 
••^wi y \t;sir su^ 



with thi 
will got 
and th«' 
Theri' 
a rt'adx 
gested 
determi 
opinion 
mendati 
tion Tl 
studied 
and is t: 
any am 
situation 
Mcanw 
dents. I 
in shap< 
relief v 



opentn»^s |iari rin)«- .md lull 
time. ■>iiKk-ni.s are wt'lcom«' 
to corn. Hi Tom Althoff if 
they art- socking joh 
openings Hi> ran be reached 
at .ISfJ I2(M). extension 247 

JtHE SERENDIPITV SHOPJ 

HALF PRICE 
EARRING SALE 

Pierced earrings from 
$1.00 to $25.00 



'>urc)iaM WW ««<r •! MrrMfl • 
«•< Mtond pair ol •«Mal •■IM 



i»> » l«« *rk> 
I J ftlCI 



in coming 



orxnsiis . I 
.^f ,1 reconi 
• "'ininislni 
lid will I . 
• s| . iidi'd I 
■li p l>U.i, 
'tilt ilu' Im k. r 

!l' ll.irpor stu 

l.io.^t- hi( cp.s 
t'T it looks lik.' 
>li' l>« <i long tinit 



WE SELL EVERYTHING 
FROM BIBLES TO 
WATERBEDS 



Water Bed kits under 
Framei! - $60.00 



$40.(H) 



4 t*St NOITMW^St HIGHWAY 
A»llNGtON HflGHTS IlllNOIS «0004 

^HONE MI4M7 
Gif IS - CA»OS iOOKS (,.,1,^ t THINGS | 

acroii Irom *• irom (lotion 



Oct. 29, 1973 



M/IKbllNVzTtK 



Page 3 



Harper trikers place 5th 



By 

DIANE DiBARTOLOMEO 

On Saturday, October 20, 
The 5th Annual IIT Intercol- 
legiate Invitational Tricycle 
Race was held. The Illinois 
institute of Technology in 
Chicago sponsored the race 
as part of their "Spring - 
thing Festivities." 

Two classes of vehicles 
entered the race: the regular 
and the modified divisions 
Teams entering the regular 
division rode and built regu- 
lar, standard tricycles pro- 
vided by IIT The modified 
rode their own individually 
designed tricycles. 

Harper College entered 
for the first time in the reg- 
ular division Representing 
the Harper Trikers were 
Stacey Bueschel-Pit crew 
capl.. Mark Geallis, Marty 
Huchins, Bob Peterson, 
Jeanne Rodseth. Roger 
Skarr, Mark Tabac, capt , 
and Gerardo Udler, who went 
under the name of The All 
Star Kids 

Other colleges represent - 
ed were: Northwestern, Du- 
Page, Vandercock, and Mi- 



chael Reese. 

"The Kids" gompeted 
against 18 other teams in a 
12 lap race Ground the IIT 
fire lane They startedinthe 
4th row when the race got 
underway at 2:05 At the end 
of the first lap "The Kids" 
were in 8th plactf, "from 
then on it was uphill all the 
way" exclaimed Mark Ta- 
bac, team capt 
DOPE PEDDLERS 
PUSH KIDS 

A minor disturbance oc- 
curred in the 7th lap when 
The Dope Peddlers of IIT 
attempted to push The Kids 
All Star Capt Mark Tabac 
off the track The Peddlers 
received a penalty of one 
lap. However. lateronTabac 
confessed he was leading 
the pushers on. 

HARPER TRIKERS 
MAKE HISTORY 

All .Star triker Gerardo 
Udler made history when 
his tricycle turned over and 
he scrapped his left knee 
It is the first casualty re 
ported in five years 

Out of 18 teams. The Har 
per All Stars placed 5ih in 



the race. Northwesterns 
Purple Haze took first place 
and won $200 in prize mon- 
ey IITs Dope Peddlers 
made 2nd and won $100. 
A trophy was also given to 
the first all female team to 
finish the race. 

Next year The Harper 
Trikers plan to '.ake first 
place in both divisions. 

At the end of therace 
the 18 tricycles v/eT^ do- 
nated to charity. 




8 week courses begin Nov. 22 



Harper photo contest 



The Photo staffof the Har- 
binger is pleasedto announce 
that with the coming issue. 
space will be available to 
the members of the College 
Community for the display 
of their photographic work 

A limited space is avail- 
able foi'thepublicationof one 
pictur<- ner Issue We will 
be tl" judge at what that 
pictut'- is to be The deci- 
sion will be final 

Pictures should be of good 
quality, and in good taste 
You are not limited to the 




Bonnie Koloc 

WILL BE AT ROSARY COLLEGE SATUR 
DAY, NOV, 17 — 7-9 P.M WITH THE 
•SOUND SYSTEM- ROCK GROUP AND 
COMEDIAN STEVE MOORE TICKETS - 
$300 MAIL ORDERS ACCEPTED UNTIL 
NOV 5. SEND STAMPED RETURN 
ENVELOPE WITH CHECK TO ROSARY 
COLLEGE COMMUNICATIONS. 7900 W 
DIVISION ST. RIVER fOREST. ILL 
60M5. rPHONE FO 9-6320 ) 



use of material that pertains 
to Harper The subject can 
be anything that you deem 
worthy of taking apictureof 
Rules for sutxnission will 
be available from the Har- 
binger Office. A367 There 
will be no prizes offered for 
the selection of your 
material, only the gratifica 
tion of seeing your material 
in prim. 

Any picture submitted 
must be in our office on the 
Wednesday before the issue 
is to appear. 



RtfgiJtnitkm la open for the 
•ecoQd ichedule of eight-week 
oouraei In the 1973-74 wmeater 
at Harper CoQege. Htmi will 
begin the week of Nov. 12 and 
run through Jan. 16. 

BUS 101-016 Accounting I wiU 
be held from 6:S to 9:06 pjn. 
Mondays and Wednesdays in 
Room F-306 at Harper CoUege. 
BUS 111-014 Introduction to 
Business Organization hours 
are 6:2S to 9:06 p.m. Tuesday 
and Thursday evenings in Room 
E-107. BUS \W-O01 Principles of 
Supervision will be held from 
6:26 to 9:06 p.m. in Romn D-231 
on Tuesdays and Thursdays. 

The ENG 102-017 English 
Composition class will meet 
afternoons from 1 to 4:30 p.m. 
on Monday and Wednesday in 
Rodm F-316. SPE 101-024 Fim- 
damentals of Speech Commu* 
nication will be hekl from noon 
to 1:60 p.m. Tuesdays and 
Thursdays in Room F-307. 

HUM 101-007, Creative Nature 
of Man I, is scheduled for 
Wednesday ^nd Friday mom- 




■ M %■» NIW-UNOITICTABlf MAIirrilCf 

try it free 



HOUSE OF HAIR 



17 W. Diivis 
ArlinKton H(h. III. 
:m»4 o.">.-.o 



THE "NO-SAIE " "SHE" at STEREO STUDIO 



Rrttular Sale* mean list pricnt reduced 
product. We don't have reftular »alc« - 
These are ju»t gome of the items at our 
No-Sale SALE Pricn 



MA*ANr2 7010 
JVC JJIl 
SANSUI 3S0A 
«0S< 747 
KOSS 2 2 
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USI 



2l»»i 
J49»S 
23»»S 
45 00 
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3495 



NOW 



I3««S 

27 00 
SI 00 
22.00 




Jereo 

iruMD lout- 



1415 K. PHliUine Rowd 

(at WindM»r Dr.f 
ArlioKlon Hts.. Illinois 



to the actual work of the 
just everyday low prices. 

you'll aliio And 

IK 

rHo*(NS 

PMIIU^S 

DUAI 

SONY 

WONEfH 

SHE*W0O0 

SMU»f 

MAXEK 

W«TT$ 



398-8510 



ings in Room F-326 from 9:00 to 
11:60a.m. 

Music Appreciation, MUS lOJ., 
004, will be held at the Schaum- 
burg Library from 9 a.m. to 



PSY 101-013. will be held at 
Harper in Room F-319 Friday 
from noon to 6 pjjv The PSY 
21M07 Child Psychology I class 
meets in Room F-318 Tuesday 



noon on Tuesdays and Thurs- and Thursday evenings from 

<l«y» 6:25 pjn. to 9:06 pjn. 

The MTH 102-010 Inter- Introduction to Sociology, 

mediate Algebra class wUl meet SOC 101-011, will be held at 

Tuesday and Thursday eve- Barrington High School in 

nings from 7:60 to 10:30 p.m. in Room A-221 from 6:26 to 9:06 

Room F-303. p.m. Mondays and Weckieadays. 

College Algebra, Math 103- Registratkin may be made at 

014, will be held at Conant High the admissions office. 
School in Hoffman Estates Mon- 



days and Wednesdays, from 
6:26 to 9:06 p.m. 

Psy iui-011. Introduction to 
Psychology is scheduled for 
6 26 to 9:06 p.m. Tuesdays and 
ThursQays at Cooper Junior 
High School in Buffalo Grove. 

Introduction to Psychology, 




Poudditional informa- 
tion . caU 397-30ib. ext. 207. 



RESEARCH 



Thousands of Topics 
S2.75 per page 
Send lor jtm i*-l»4olt. IbO^Mi. 
mtii o»*r calaltf (acioM tfOO 
to covtr pmtatc (dttxtrr lime n 
I to 2 don) 

RESEARCH ASSISTAMCT INC 

11941 W'lSHIRt BlVO . SUITE »: 

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f2i3)477M?4of47;M93 

Oif rttMrtk MatariM ii *•« tar 



Say "I love 
with 




you 

more love 
than money. 



For lusUss.tn fact. 

Yes we have fine quality 
diamonds for S 98 ArxJonup 
to 13 000 You II find them in any 
oneclour stores And you H 
aporeciate two ru les every 
Hollands employee lives by 



Ftrat. w never highprctsure. We 
prefer that you shoo slowly and 
carefully Look at only those 
diamondsthat you can afford We 
have a large selection m your price 
category Ask as many questions as 
you like We M give you all the 
answers Straight 



SccorHl. since 1 91 our pottcy of 
returning your mortey if loi any 

reason you re not satisfied 
So if you have the love andalittle 
bitolmonpy we have the right 
dianrvond for you 



IIoIIiiimIk •Imolrrs 



l)..,Mi!,n\n I i'l \ \\,,l 



J. I> 



M ri,, 



I.ikriiiir-l Wdo.ltM'ld 



I a 



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\ 



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Page ^ 



T€ 



H>1RBINGER 



Oct. 29. 1973 



OUTPUT- 



> 



Ovr femfer? 



The purpose of the constitution is to establish the 
balance of power between the government and its peo- 
ple It also states the rights and the Umitattons of 
power within the office of the presidency. But what hap- 
pens when our "leader of mankind" does not carry out 
his duties as stated in the constitution, instead he goes 
above it and disobeys? Is this not sufRcient ground for 
impeachment? 

Tlie reason for impeachn>ent dpes not necessarily have 
to be a crime, but it can be any form of disobeying a 
court order. When President Nbcon refused to release 
the Watergate tapes, he ahowed himself to be in direct 
defiance of the power of the court 

To offer a compromise or "such a deal", is not 
Justification for dismissal for his citation for contempt 
of court. We feel that the run around B.& we've, been 
receiving from the Nixon Administration should ''come 
~to an. -end. We demand that the straight forward facts 
should be the only evidence considered. When the ques- 
tion of impeachment reaches the highest ofllce in the 
country, the truth must be presented and not be second 
hand infortnadon. 

By wttfabolding the tapes. Mr. Nixon lias aroused 
public Mitplcion. The trust of the people in their so 
called "leader of mankind" has been in doubt for too 
long a time. Hie questions must be answered and prov- 
en by fact 



We welcome and eocourage letter* to the 
editor. They are ftubjed lo rditing and con- 
densation lb meet spare and ulyle requirements, 
and each must bear the writer's signature and 
address. Names may be wilhheld from pubU- 
ration at the writer's refiurMl, but signed letters 
will take precedence. 



S «H>«BINGER 



nt\y 

Kdilor-in-chief 
Managing Fldilor 
Business Manager 
News Kditor 
Features Kditor 
Activities Kditor 
Sports Kditor 
C^toon Kditor . 
F'fi^o Kditor 
Phot^lraphers: 




Diane DiHartolomeo 

Donn Lynam 

Cary Zdeb 

Konald i'orep 

Kon Zoberis 

Heidi Johnson 

Phil Hattaglia 

Dennis Murray 

L. R. Kiel 

(•reg Conway. Paul Tord, Ken 

Kissam. .Ilm Moy, Mike Wellman 

and Chuck /vemeske 



Contributing .Staff 
Mary Heth Christy. Dave (lordon. Frank .McClovern, Sut*" 
Pollack. Steve Schlosscr, K K. Sinnott, (larriW >Vhite. Hill 
Whitehead (ieorge Polales III, Kich Kusnierek 
Advisor - Mr. Sturdevant 

Fhe HARBIXtiKR is the student publication for (he 
Harper College campus community. publLshed wetkly 
except during holidays and mid-terms. All opinions ex- 
pressed on the editorial page or in (he columns are 
those of the writer, and are not necessarily those of the 
college, i(9 administration, faculty or student bodv. 



For information on advertising, rates and publica- 
tion schedule, call or write Harbinger Hbsiness Of- 
fice. 

*Villiam Kainey Harper College. Algonquin and 
Koselle Hds.. Palatine, Illinois 60067. Phone nuni 
b^r 397-3(KH), ext. 272 and 4^0. 



/ 




>iNPur 



M. Chauvinist, 

First, I would like lo men- 
tion that I am not "gung- 
ho" women's lib. But M. 
Cauvlnist's letter is an in- 
sult to my intelligence as 
an "inferior" female. I feci 
the need lo defend myself. 

What gives you the idea 
thai females have It so easy 
in our society? Pftrhaps it is 
"the accepted role of the 
American male to cater to 
the desires of the female." 
Maybe the female Is placed 
upon an imaginary pedes- 
tal. But who put us there? 

You protest that males 
have a hard life In our so- 
ciety. Being a housewife with 
children is equally as dif- 
ficiilt as any Job a male 
could acquire. Being a 
housewife is nerve-wrack- 
ing. It's boring. It's never 
ending. How many girls say, 
"Mv main goal in life is to 
be a housewife so I can push 
my kids around in a shop- 
ping cart at K-Mart" Oh, 
yes, the males have it SO 
rough. Well, you can thank 
yourself for (ha( (o a certain 
extent. 

Since the beginning of time, 
it has been an unwavering 
belief that men are superior 
to women. It was Adam and 
Kve-NOT Kve and Adam. 
The women today have a dif- 
ficult time merely trying to 
undo the beliefs or prej- 
udices that the males have 
created over the years. 

As for making decisions 
on a date, it is not necessar- 
ily up to the male alone. All 
he had to do is ask the girl 
out, pay fft^^the date, an^ 
drive. (And a $40 date? OH, 
come on. If that ever hap- 
pens under the age of 25, 



I think HeU will freexeover.) 
Anyway, you say that it's 
possible to drop $40 on a 
date (this amazes me) and 
get a hand shake if you're 
polite enough. Well, what did 
you expect? Nevermind, I 
know what you expect. And 
that doesn't say too much for 
you either. Every time a girl 
goes out she's taking a 
chance. She has to wait 
around to BE asked out 
Any other approach would 
be considered "too for- 
ward." And when she final- 
ly gets asked, whether it's 
a $40 date or a $2 movie, 
there is usually (about 99 
I>er cent of the time) one 
main thought in the guy's 
mind that seemed to engulf 
the whole atmosphere. Now 



SHE has to make the deci- 
sion of how much she is will- 
ing to "lay on the line" (if 
anything). Girls pay for 
their dates emotionally. I 
would RATHER pay the 
money. Most girls couldn't 
care less about how much 
Is being spent on them. 
They would rather forget 
about the money and Just 
have a good time. 

Some males have the per- 
ception and consideration 
to realize thai females are 
not really inferior. In fact 
some even go as far as to 
say that women are stronger. 
(God forbid!) I appreciate 
them. All I can say is, "M. 
Chauvinist you'd better 
clean up your act" 

M. Malecki 



This is in answer to Mrs 
EM Levins letter whiih 
appeared in the October 2.'<r(l 
issue of The Harbinger. 
What si <4>iectcd to was 
the book nilv stfn every .so 
often in the student lounge, 
which is set up by the Seek 
ers organization, a recog- 
nized activity group here at 
Harper 

Why should she be so up- 
set about this table"' The 
times I have gone by there. 
I have seen no aggressive 
(actics employed to forct- 
students over to buy the 
books, and the pe-ople work- 
ing at the table are very 
pleasant and don t trytopu.sh 
their views onto you. Some 
people who have stopped to 
look at the books andpam- 
phets seek a further enrich- 
ment of their lives through 
Christ. while still some 
more stop there, not so much 
because cf belief in a su- 
preme being, but because 
they are curious about "the 



.Jesus movement" 

College is a place for 
advancement of learning and 
of further inquiry beyond 
one senvirorunent We cant 
just stop at our own views, 
we must take a look at the 
views of others to gain a 
wider understanding of all 
people 

This is a community col- 
lege which does and should 
be aware of the community 
constituency Thlscommun - 
ty includes tax-paying Chris- 
tians as well Tlie .student 
lounge at Harper is the 
center of communications 
and serves as the meeting 
place for the community 
whether it be the Seekers 
with their table, the Coffee 
House, rock concerts, blue- 
grass concerts, orpolitical 
speeches (those of last year 
which involved Walker ' and 
Ogilvle 



A. Y. St?hoenberger 



Oct. 29, 1973 



T€ 



H/1?BINGER 



THE H.I.A. REPORT 



By SUE POLLAK . 
KAYO OLESKVICH 

A student presented a 
question to the Harbinger 
which concerns all of us at 
Harper Why isn't there any 
locker space provided'^ This 
became the start fo the Har- 
binger Intelligence Agency, 
an investigati/e service, 
available to students, ded- 
icated to Truth. Justice 
and the American Way Here 



is a two week in depth re- 
port as covered by our 
HI A staff , 

If you are one of Har- 
per's 9,000 full and part- 
time students, carrying 
those 12 or 16 hours of 
credit also means carrying 
around a lot of heavyt)ooks- - 
on top of your coat, notes 
and notebooks, a purse (or 
satchel, backpack, or brief- 
case, as ttrs case may be) 



Harper G>mniunity Orchestra 
to perforin tonight 



The Harper College Com- 
munity Orchestra, under the 
direction of Dr George Ma- 
kas. will open its concert 
season tonight. Oct. 29, at 
8:00 p.m., in the College 
Center at Algonquin and Ro 
selle Roacte, Palatine 

The orchestra will per- 
form the Classical Symphony 
by Prokofieff, Beethoven's 
Egmont Overture, and the 
Titus Overture by Mozart 
The concert will also fea 
ture the Suzuki students of 
Betty Hoag of Arlington 
Heights, playing the Sieu 
Violin Concerto 

Debbie Himsel. a fifteen- 



year-old soprano from Rol- 
ling Meadows, will sing the 
aria 'Non So PiuCosaSon " 
from the Mozart opera. The 
Marriage of Figaro; and 
Jean von Berg, a nine - year - 
old violinist from Arlington 
Heights, will play the Vivaldi 
Concerto in A minor. 

The orchestra combines 
the talents of* Harper stu- 
dents and faculty with those 
of residents of such neigh- 
boring communities as 
Arlington Heights. Park 
Ridge, Hoffman Estates. 
Palatine. Barrington. and 
many others There is no 
admission charge, and the 
public is cordially invited 



and. possibly, a bulky port- 
folio for drawing courses. 
Well, relax; in just a month 
or so you'll be able to add 
boots, a hat, scarf and gloves 
to the load, dragging it all 
behind you as you run from 
class to class 

Sound depressing? Most 
s tudents s ur veyed la st week 
thought the best solution 
to the backbreaking dilem- 
ma would be the installation 
of lockers throughout the 
buildings on campus Unfor 
tunately. though, prospects 
of this being accomplished 
in the near future look pret- 
ty dim 

The question is not, first 
of all. whether lockers are 
wanted, for clearly the ma- 
jority of the students poll - 
ed thought they would be an 
asset to the college routine 
The biggest advantage point- 
ed out was the idea of con- 
venience-having lockers 
would save a trip out to the 
car for books (especially ap- 
preciated during the winter, 
most girls noted) as well 
as save the arm muscles 
straining under too hea\T a 
load 

Students differed, how 
ever , when (he question was 
whether or not thev should 
bring U- i i I iks Somi- 
thought ■ IIHM1I would 



be "too much of a hassle, ' 
while others preferred it 
that way, over a built -in lock 
system Many said they'd 
be willing to pay something, 
either toward the lockers 
themselves or as they used 
them. 

Places named as most 
convenient for the lockers, 
if they were to be installed, 
were the third floor of F 
building, the halls of D, 
downstairs in A. outside 
lecture rooms, and in a 
building made just for lock- 
ers, without anything else in 
it " Students just seemed 
to want a place on campus 
where theycould store things 
if they wished. 

Full-time students, as ex- 
pected, were more in favor 
of having lockers than part- 
time, and art and archi- 
tecture devotees were most 
enthusiastic of all "Lock- 
ers would make things easier 
on everybody. one archi- 
tecture major said, "but if 
there were some big enough 
to put these portfolios , in. 
that'd be just great " 

Some of the difficulties of 
the issue were pointed out 
by Donald M Mislc. Har- 
per's Director of Busi 
ness Services 

We' have been wrestling 
with the problem of lockers 



Page 5 



since HarpeV was new," 1^ 
explained 'We thought then 
that some would be put on the 
third floor of A building, 
where the lounge chairs are 
now." Only a hundred lock- 
ers at the most, however, 
could be installed there, he 
went on to say, and that 
number wouldn't really solve 
anything 

The main question the ad- 
ministration has is where 
enough lockers for all the 
students who want them 
can be put Besides this 
quantity /space problem, 
MIsic stated other consider- 
ations such as a locker fee, 
the upkeep of the lockers, 
and the circulation space 
they would take up He also 
mentioned that there would 
have to be some method 
fair to all in selecting which 
students were to use the 
lockers 

Lockers would cost about 
$28 per opening, according 
to an Elk Grove distributor, 
and would take atxxjt four 
weeks to be delivered There 
is even a choice of colors 
grey, brown, or green As 
Misic said, however. lockers 
aren t part of the Harper 
budget right now 

Coat hooks may bean al- 

(Turn (o page 2) 








Y^W 



20t Draught Beers 

(with Harper I.D.) 




^ 



J 




8 



V 



^ 



Page 6 



T€ 



H/I^BINGER 



Oct. 29, 1973 



obituary 



Brian Masino passed away 
Saturday Oct 20, 1973 He 
was only 19 years old He 
died of a brain tumor that 
he had for 5 years bit was 
only known Saturday He 
was a pretty well known 
p^rson around the town of 
Schaumburg and he was very 



well liked a mona his friends 
He t>ecame engaged on the 
day of his death to Vivian 
Knapp He was on two hoc- 
key teams. Schaumburg «nd 
Harper last year On.j of 
the hockey teams is dedica- 
ting a irophey to him for the 
number one player We are 
writing this article to let 
those of you who were not 
contacted, know that one of 



GLENCUIR 
OFB^MS 

On Campus — 

Harper College Community Orchestra Concert, Oct 29. 
8:00. College Center, free. 

CongrcMwoman Bella Abzug. Nov. 8 at 8:00. College 
Center. Free with Harper I.D. 

Mini-Course- An In^oduction to Belly Dancing, which 
will include background of the dance, basic dance 
movements and how it is taught in a dance claac 
Enrollment is limited to 25 students. Oct 30 & Nov 
1, 12:00-1:50, A 24 1-AB& C. 

Ski Club. Tues.. 12:15. D 231. 

Harper F'layers. Tues., 12:30, F 304. 

Coffee Hous«r feahirlng Dave Dionefotas. Tues.. Oct. 
30, 12:00 noon. 

Pom Pon GlrU seUing Taffy Apples, Oct. 30 & 31. 
9-4 in the lounge. 

"Assignment 747," on Channel 6. Tues. & Wed.. Oct 
30 & 31, at 10:00* 11:00 a.m., 12:00 noon, 1:00, 
6:00, 7:00 & 8:00 p m. Any televUion set on cam- 
pus. 

Video-taped Concert the country-folk sounds of Prot 
Jim Traub. Oct 29. Channel 6. 10 & 11 a.m., 12 
noon, 1. 5 & 6 p.m. Any television set on campus. 

Theatre— 

"The Day After the Fair", with Deborah Kerr, at 
the Studebaker Theatre. Ph. 922-2973. 

"Wait Unltl Dark", with Michael Cole, at the Pheasant 
Run. Ph. 584-1454. 

"The Influence Show", musical by Kingston Mines. 
At the Body Politic. Ph. 871-3000. 

"The Women of Division St", presented by the Rosary 
College Players, is a new play based on the Studs 
Terkel book. "Division Street: America". The dra 
ma. with chorcgraphy and music, has defmite over- 
tones of women's rights. In the Auditorium on the 
River Forest Campus, Nov. 2 & 3. 8:06. Ph. 369- 
6320. 

"The Paisley Convertible", starring C^orge HamU- 
ton. Drury Lane Theatre. Ph. PR 9-4000. 

"The Wonderful Ice Cream Suite", stafring Joe Man- 
tegna and Cordiss Feier. Organic Theatre Co. at I.eo 

* A. Lerner Theatre in Uptown Center Hull House 
Ph. LO 1-8033. 

"Ilie Skin of Our Teeth", starring Sarah Miles. Ar- 
lington Park Theatre. Ph. 392 6800. 

Continuing— 

"Grease", Blackstone Theatre. Ph. ST 2-2280. 

" Father 8 Day", starring Chita Rivera. Ivanhoe Thea- 
tre. Ph. 248-6800. ' 

"Freedom of the City", at the Goodman Theatre. 
Ph. 236-2337. 

Music- 
Don Rickles and Enzo Stuarti, thru Nov. 4. MUl Run 

Theatre. Ph. 298-2170. 
Frank Zappa, Auditorium Theatre, Oct 31 . at 7 00 

Ph. 922-21 lO 
Sergio Mendes & Brasil '77 and Lainie Kazan. Nov. 

6-11. ill Run Theatre. Ph. 298-2170. 
The London Bach Society, NoV. 4. 2:00, at the Audi- 
torium Theatre. Ph. 922-6634. 
Bayanihan Philippine Dance Co.. Nov. 11, 2:00 & 
8:00, Auditorium Theatre. Ph. 922-6634. 



your friends" has passed 
away. He was a good guy 
and will always be re- 
membered. Let us be grate- 
ful for knowing this fine 
young man. He will be 
buried at St. Peters 
Cemetery off Schaumburg 
road 

Renie ArchibHld 

Vivian Knapp aware 
Marc Schwartz mor 



Q4KE 




I h. 



MKiitly l)ecomf 

II -.;l\ iigly ru- 

.Kiirt : 'le • uiinds hert- 



f^Design Your Ring. 



Jusi Decause n s yout love. 

and your day, 
make it your very own ring. 





l)nata ^^^ 

Choose the band, the timsh, the setting 
And It s all yours 
Sonata. 
Lets you £>e you 

Flaherty Jewelers 

2 North Dunlon 
AriinKlon Ht«.. 111. 

253-4690 



WIGS 

SALES AND SERVICE 



Closed on Men, 




<7jaitarciiinq <Salon 



rOR A l-OVUKM YOU 




For a lovlier you 
PHONE: 381 4499 



«»I2MII IH \OKIHViKSr H\\\ 
BARRINGTOV M.I.IVOIS WMIIO 



Hitit \OU truil our f(,;i- 

"PIZZA IN THE PAN" 

i/»t> MfiMi^ /t.K.* hmgir cliiclicu 

fiti famous It jliuii ^inrial ivii 

I'ifclicrs of betrsuji iiriiiks ,iim<- 

/;r^ Ml, fie on Satunluy ■*■ Stituiay cwiHitfis 

THE ROMAN HOUSE 

Ok .Miluaiikci \vcwH- jttst ,'ottli of iMvrfirU Road 
0"»*^** pitcher of twer per $5 piiza order witti tt^is ad 



HAliOmiH 



MASKS 

MAKE-UP 

FEET 



• BEARDS 
. NOSES 
. WIGS 



HATS 

HANDS 

HAIR 



PLUS OTHER NOS' RELATED ITEMS m AT 
MA y IXTENEST YOU IF HAUjOWEEX nOESXT 



F.l's Trkk Sfcop 

Randhurst Shopping Center 



392-5280 



on th» 1 .1 (I • .iinpus. How 
this rtii. >r .;iii started, who 
starte • it itid why it w.is 
starte v l^ iv»ni been able 
to figiii . 1 ui Hut . we do feel 
that ill .ill lairness to the 
student ii<>d> ol Harper Col- 
lege u«' should bring the 
whole M •- ss out into the open 

By • w >ou are probably 
asking 'lur.sfir what this 
ugly. uly rumor can be 
Even ii \ou re not asking 
yourseM I m Koing to tell 
you Tilt 1 iimur is that liar 
per Co!i- i.«' lias » represen 
tative >tiiik-nt government 
This .'•ink.MU senate, here 
after i .nvn us .SSHC. has 
been e.- « »• d by a small ma 
jorlty ■ . u large minority, 
but thill is totally besides 
the ptni r ,it this juncture 

« 

We .sMri»Ml our search for 
the SSIH' III the most obvi 
ous pl.uf I he student sen 
ate offices I eelingsurethat 
someone there would be able 
to help us get to the bottom 
of our rumor, we stumbled 
blindly into a solid wall of 
blank viares and lame ans 
wers I MtKses abounded, but 
nothing was said that held 
any real substance We look 
ed und. I dtsk.s. behind clos 
ed do. IS u< « wn looker! 
in garJMge tans, but to no 
avail \.i trace of SSHH 



Thinking thai (>erhaps 
senatr \v.i- i.ikint; a citffe*' 
break .<ir im \t stof) was th»- 
cafetefi.i i.«Ntking around at 
the stM of H.ipp\. rontent 
ed" fa«i s wi- uondered if 
perhai N lurking behind one 
of th«'SF fac< tious fasoadrs 
was an interested, concern 
ed mc-mher of SSHC After 
some '.Ime. we decided that 
there weren't any interested, 
concerned members of SSIK' 
visible 

Continuing our search in 
the cafeteria we looked 
through mounds and mounds 
of partially cooked mashed 
potatoes, gallons and gal- 
lons of watery soup, and 
came up with nothing but a 
splitting headache and a col- 
ossal rase of indigestion 
We even went so far as to 
stir up the mustard and ket 
chup on the condiment table 
Just like most things, when 
you are about ready to give 
up hope - Bango - some- 
thing happens to change ' 
the whole scope of your view- 
point 

I finally found the SSHC. 
Not lurking and hiding, but 
boldly standing al the fore- 
front of apathy. Not wanting 
to step on any toes, but 
rather trying lo remain as 
inconspi^ous as possible. 
Not only did I find SSHC. 
I also found it.s president. 
Concerned and dedicated as 
he is we fell sure ihal he 
would be able lo offer some 
help in slating purposes and 
ideas. II is lesponsi' lo our 
first staieiiieiil was " Ihai's 
a giHxI idea, im a Dt-mo- 
craf •■ 

Yes tricnds. the rumor 
is irui Miiicriur iieh. 



Oct 29,1973 



f€ 



Part Time Kvening work available 
Light Janitorial in KIk Grove area. 
Call882-2870 or 359-1505 

Wanted - Girl to help with houae- 
work for family of five with work- 
ing mother. Hours can be arrang- 
ed. Call 35»-3335 after 3:00 P.M. 



Combination Freezer Refrigerator 
Sears $75.00; Cocktail table, end- 
able & table Teak $20.00, 
$15.00 & $5.00 respectively. 
991-2037. 

Into on ptacini riacsified ads- 
call 397-3000 eat 272 



CRITICS RAVE! "A HILARIOUS MUSICAL!" 

WM tlONAta. TtllUMI 

lOlSTIIOUf AHO «OW0T> EVHTONE SHOULD SAVOt 
TMIJ RAKE EVENT! IT SHOULD At^MAl NOT ONLY TO 
TMOSI WHO WENT TO SCHOOL IN THI SOt lUT TO OTHII 
AGES AS WElt." 

THE WILDEST, FUNNIEST. RAUNCHIEST EVENING 
YOU'VE EVER SPENT IN THE THEATRE. I LOVED IT! " 

HOY LtONARO. TRIBUNb 




:r....s£«j[f 



coW 



TICKETS AT BOX OFFICE & BY MAIL 

Emiex m W a 4 t9%t4 >iamp*d anvvlop* apittt ci>ack or 
■now* "4- po,ahl» to ttACKSTONf THEArtE. «0 
f loftjc r. CSMogo N «060S 'o> bni (>>o.c» e< 




tiOXOfflCtOflN 
\b:fV -HJU lOfiPMj 

CaliCf &U40 
SMIi«toTlCKETROf« 



Mofl 



PkiCCS 



•♦wuThoft 
ond Sot 



t vet 

Wed Mot.oeet ? ^ M 



8 PM 
115 



W Mo»»neeV? r M i7 90 f $7 50 



0«CH 



h 



S8 90 



WW 
'WW 



H«L 



BAi:_ 

6M> 



$8 90 7 50 



590 

_ — . 



?nHBAt(;] 
>4 00 ^ 



15 00 



S4 00 




Sl<M>AV MAIINEE'". AT 3 P M 

•-AMr pqiCES AS Tl'ls tHUhS 



H>I?BINGER 



page 7 



Earn Money 

.Students, earn extra money 

selling ecology based 

Shaklee Products. 

Karn up to $7 an hr. 

Call 358^0^159, after 4:00. 



Help Wanted 

■ to run sourK) for 

Harper's CofTeehouses 

luesdays 11:30 a.m. -ISOp.m 

( ontaci: Hope Spruance, 

student Activities Koom /\-336 

1967 Honda "305 " 
Hardly uacd. laspeed 
Belgian Racer. Flaming red 
(Jury Kxt. 272 latter 12:(X)» 
or 272-41.52 I Sundays) 

Wanted: 

Live-in or day care for two girN. 

ages 3 and 5 

In Hunting Kidge area 

right behind college. 

Room and board plus salary open. 

CaU 3.'>H 197.1 Pays 

359-5537 Kvenings. 
Ask for I'dt Walker 

« 

Work on campus in 
Community Rel<ation« Office 

Typing & clerical duties 
1<> I8hr;wk 
Contact Ruth Hisel 
Kxi 2«j« Rm A 323 

Dial a lirrre«af> 

Will type reports. the»t'«. resume, etc 
Sperlol otudent rule* 



PUBLIC SESSIONS EVERY DAY 

Class Lessons for all Ages 884 I I 70 

dfield. 



ce 





geioniffloM 
bimbottom 



I 



AfpsiJe 



308 E RAND RD. ARLINGTON HEIGHTS - Morthpomt Shopping Center 398 6140 



JeonJ<Klie<t %% %% Hue 0«n»n, $* «« 

Oew NmIi Soeoleft tf ♦• t.bt»*d TuriWn«fc» »7 •« 
■aterStwtt «S $0 flonn»IS>wt« 97 t« 



WEEKLY SPECIALS - $3.09 
FULL LINE OF BUDGET L.P.'s - 41.99 

WE KNOW MUSIC 

reSulah ^ 55.98 list LP's -$3.99 
FsicES! / $6.98 list Tapes -$4.95 



PLIPSIDE ALSO SERVES YOU AT 

CC4 LI.NDFN 3311 VV. FOSTER 
lViN.\ErKA CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

416 7343 478 1490 



® 



ELECTRONIC BOX OFFICE 
CHICAGOLANDS CONCERT CENTER 




n.ETS GET ACQUAINTED" 



tPXonai 



ai^ purchase 



1^ 



I MMT 1 OOUfON 
aCHfUNCHAM 
T>»ua U»J 



Every Tuesday Night 

LADIES DRINK FREE 
S-IOp.m. 

</2 Price 10 to I2p.in. 

MacArtJiur Park Pub 
S30 W. DuiHlee, WiieeiiRg 



HALLOWEEN NIGHT AT 

MocArthur Park Pub 




cunllf: 

^1 



I 

.lOLF 

{ 






FeotuVing "FREIGHT "] 

A Party Time Production 




/ 



/ 



><. 



\ 



s^ 



} 



Page 8 



T€ 



H/4RBINGER 



Oct. 29, 1973 



Victory on ice 



Victor Cabrera is a fel- 
low Harper student from 
Mexico He is tal(ing the 
Food Service Management 
program, and besides Itnow- 
ing how to cook, he consid- 
ers ice sculpture and the 
ability to speai( several lan- 
guages important contribu- 
tions toward his major. Ice 
sculptures can be used as 
decorations for parlies, and 
the process involved to make 
them requires the sculptor's 
skill and exact knowledge 
of what }^ is planning to do 
Some of the basics of ice 
sculpture are similar to 
those of regular sculpture, 
as Victor found out while 
taking some art courses He 
learned the majority of this 
skill from his father 

Ice sculptures can be 
formed from almost any size 
block of ice. however, it is 
harder to create details in 
smaller blocks of ice 
Victor makes a swan from 
a ISO pound block of ice 
The ice should be left out of 
the freezer about one half 
hour before beginning or it 
will crack It is also pas 
sible to work on the sculp- 
ture in the freezer Trans- 
porting the ice is the big- 



gest problem because it is 
so heavy. Once the ice is 
on a suitable stand, the next 
step is to chop off any un- 
necessary ice with a tool 
called a shaver. The design 
is scratched onto the ice. 
and the shaver is used to 
make a rough outline of one 
half of the design The se- 
cret is working fast, before 
too much of the ice melts 
The first half of the swan 
is made in a half hour, with 
the use of a chisel to form 
finer details and give the 
sculpture smoothness. The 
rough figure then goes back 
in the freezer until it re- 
freezes The other ha If of the 
sculpture is made exactly 
the same and should take 
the same amount of time 
The sculpture then goes 
back in the freezer, and the 
details are finished about 
one half hour before the 
party If a crack forms, it 
is possible to mend it with 
salt, although the mending 
will be visihitv but accord 
ing to Victor. It t bKter 
than Elm r"s 'Jlue A st.'am 
gun mu\ al-v b*. used in 
making i ai-ulpture to give it 
a clarifi.'d tffect The addi 
tion of i-olored lights adds 



Maintenance employees 
reach agreement 



sparkle to the finished 
sculpturtj. but it will melt 
in about five hours, depend- 
ing on the room temperature 
and how hot the lights are 
Hopefully the party will be 
over by then. 

Besif.. .s ice sculpting, 
being uu amatuur wine tas- 
ter and .speaking Spanish. 
English and French. Victor 
plans on learning Italian and 
German He feels these lan- 
guages ure important in 
understiiiiding chefs from all 
over the world Presently. 
Victor is working in food 
servici'S and teaching a 
Harper course, with the as- 
sistant director of food 
services, at Barrington High 
School 



(]33<i3 anacn 



33331! 3333 3393 

>1133n^ 33333333 

3333 3333 



3333 3933 33933 



333 3333333 333 



333333 333333 
33333 33339 




for Tota/Perforffionce 
TUIME-UPS 






>^> 



use thn NEW 






358-2550 



i}m CCHLIIJ i UIM iUP KITS 

••■ ' (-MAINS H D POINTS, CONOf '.SfP S^aokPiOC 

s.' •<, Sun » I.- 4»»i »0.95 »(,) f7.Q5 ifvi S10.95 



I 



up to 

PALATINE AUTOI.IOTIVE SUTPI.v r.o 



I. 




ARE YOU IN LOVE? 



HAPPY' the h«ort$trucfc bear 
says: "GET YOUR "HONEY" 
something spociol at: 

NORTHPOINT JEWIERS 

They will design jewelry to your 
ipecHications. 

engagement rings our specialty 



The Maintenance Work- 
ers, and Harper College 
have reached a tentative 
agreement, in their contract 
dispute, which had left the 
Maintenance Workers here 
without a contract since 
June 30. 

Included in the contract 
package, is a 6.1 percent 
pay increase, retroactive to 
July 1 of this year, and a 
clause which equalizes the 
pay for the females on the 
staff to the same level with 
their male contemporaries. 

According to Mr. Fox- 



worth of Service Employees 
International, Local 11, the 
rates paid to the Harper 
Maintenance Staff are be- 
coming more realistic, altho 
they are still not "Up to 
par." 

Any contract, must be rat- 
ified by the College Board, 
in its next scheduled meeting, 
which is to be on the 8th of 
November. When asked if 
he expected any troui»le with 
the College Board, Mr. Fox- 
worth stated that "We ex- 
pect the College will raUfy 
it." 



Sign language course offered 



This sign language course 
is an introduction to one of 
the most interesting forms of 
communication. Students 
will be taught: the Manual 
Alphabet, the most frequent- 
ly used signs, and a short 
history of sign language. 

Sign language is being of- 
fered to enable students 
to engage in conversation 
with hearing-impaired stu- 
dents on campus, and will 
be taught by Mrs. Lee Potts, 
Registered . Interpreter for 
the Deaf. The Student Senate 
on October 25th voted un- 
animously to fund this 
mini course. 



There are 16 deaf stu- 
dents on campus att^ding 
classes through the aid of 
the Hearing Impaired Pro- 
gram. The program pro- 
vides interpreter and note- 
takers following the student 
to participate in the class 
activity. Since, these stu- 
dents have been on campus, 
an interest in communica- 
tion with them has been gen- 
erated throughout the stu- 
dent body. The course is 
open to all Harper students, 
faculty, and staff. 

For more information, 
and to register, please con- 
tact the Student Activities 
Office- Room A336. 



Before you buy 

Auffo Insiironce 
Call 495-0648 

* Good student discount * Motorcycles all CC's 

• Driver training credit ' Financial Responsibility 

• 20% Savings for faculty 

Bradley/Bradley Agency Insurance Inc. 



Keep on Strummin' 

With A 

GUITAR from KARNES 




S«l«ct from Doieni of Folk. Clatiic, 
Jumbo, 1 2 String ond Electric mod«ls 
You'll fall in Love With One! 

fvaturin^ 
OIISON ACOUSTIC YAMAHA 
FiNDIR MARTIN OVATION 

AMOOTMIIt 

IVIBTTMiNG fOB IHI GUlTABliT 

low COST RENTALS AND LESSONS 



fRtt 



TIMEX WATCH 

With Any Ncw'Guitar 





Unbr*aliabl» Main Spring. Data 
Window. Sw«>p S>cond Hand, Off»r Limited 



298-1333 

Maari: Satir «.«. laf •.1:J0 
>¥• ll-I 

9100 MILWAUKEI AVE. 
DES RLAINES 

< J •loT»i Ho o) 0«M HHifll 



Oct. 29, 1973 



Page 9 



H/1?BMGER FC4IES 




► r# SOCTTi<^'l<now 

that mad ccientitt, 

tti'one that liv«6 in 

tiiat cpooicy cJMtle on 

top of that mountAin.. 

jnd m it ma moHstanV. 




■C- 


3 " 5 


^H6 7 6 9 


'°H 


W- ^ 




W- 


H 


■ 


18 


1'^ 


iT 

1 


21 22 


mL ■ 




2', 


26^H27' 


> 


10 


3^ 


12 33 




ta^H^HH *" 


'>o^H-i 


pvM 


37 38 39 




•<2 4) tth 


"5 


^■■■50 


5^BBT2 




•"J 


1 




■■(^0 


WL 




fc 


y 


mi' 




ML 


mk 



I t-'^ri Julius. 1<>73 T«rru« 0*73-5 



Wan* U after I.arryt body Oavf. 
Lifr Is a JuHKle. R. KlpUn« 
Drar Jackie, hurry home, we mlM 
you mucho. Bonnwltl and Teller. 
Do it, you will hale yourself in the 
morning. LDP. 

R.P. Your BA It in our ofHce. 
Pleaae reclaim it. Jerry. 
How did your pizza laate. If il 
wa* bad, call Pizza anonymout. 
care of Sam Plzzahollc*. 
Tom. If they are draiifdna, try 
a ilronfter elaatic. Hetty. 
Men of the world, unit. Now i« 
the lime to burn your .locltey thort*. 
\/o not leave the feat^les to their 
folly. I'nite. and be counted. Burn 
in at the fireplace Tuesday at one. 
M. C'hauvaunist 

To H cheapo, I hope your tales 
are wearinx thin, now that you 
have no one to mooch rides from. 
Kindly repay the SSSSS you owe 
a certain person. Wised up. 
The Y Chromosome is obscene. 
>I.S. 

A Double X Chromosome is ob- 
scene. I,KK. 
Derk Stardust. I love you. Bruaer. 



Martha come home, all isforKlven. 
John M. 

Sally, I love you murr than yciu 
will ever know. Ralph 
Jerry, we promise to buy you li>e 
new car thai you have always 
wanted. Call collect. Mums, and 
Dad a. 

George I miss you very much, 
pleaae come home. l.<eroy. 
I am responsible for my debts, 
and my debts only. CaL 
la your love Hfe getting you down? 
Call dial a lover 870- '»$» 
There is a failure to communicate 
around here. If you don'l belie\e 
me. Just ry and find me. KDT 
This inslitutlan is run by a board. 
DRL. 

If you have icad this far, you 
deaerve a medal. I.RK. 
John, I don't believe you. Martha 
M 

There Is a movement on this cam- 
pus. Meetings are held daily In 
the washroom. KIP 
There is no dope, like a dead 
dope AHPD 

Wanted, full lime houacwtvn for 
extra curricular activities. Contact 
UK; at Harbinger office 
Honk for Impeachment. 
President Nixon, How are your 
ears doing** \. Cox. 
I am responsible for my actions 
from April I. 1972 only RMN 
Don*t look how, but there is some- 
one watching you at you read 
this. DM. 

if you think things like this are 
easy lo write, you should try this 
tome lime. 



Doctor Mai), rumors 

F waitem t c mT ha^ it that ha% 

Sure. vsKXking on 

or^d this tmme. it's 




SoiNtwt? 

uelitiattw. 

teJt 
txtitiantT 



*J3f' 



But an<t u%«e >t 

anothar cnormou^ 

muacK-bound, 

barrai-oheeted 

brute acreawwia 

guttural gibberishr 




She orIT 
witerrtxize 
th'cauntrgaidt' 
Malir 



€ound« t'me 

that th'doctor% 

Hivanttng th' 

Momen'a Lib 




A bird in the hand is better 
tnan a sharp stick in the eye. 






ACROSS 


DOWN 




■ Mm A 


f mm 


■ ■■ilm 


1. 


Jokes 


1. custodian 




mm mm 


^L 


^^^■m. 


6. 


Hidln« Placs 


2. Tree 




mm mm 


■ 


■ 1 m. 


11. 


In Abundsr\c* 


3. , Opera 




^ ^ 


ly 


■ ^^1 m. 


12. 


Quantity 


i». txperlnent 








■ ■^IB" ^ih 


Ito. 


Letters of Prtlse 


5. Vendor 




_^_^ ^ — 


aaa^^^^ ^ 


^^ .^^_^ ^__^^ 


IS. 


Dunch of P;o««rs 


6. BoK for Tea, etc. 




^^^1^ 


^^r^ 


^^^^^ni A 


17. 


French Friend 


7. Radio * TV Character. 




1 mIC 


1 M 


ml m 1 mm 


18. 


T^pe of Seer 


8. Price 




1 11^ 


%M ■ 


wLJ 1 II 


20. 


Society of Doctors 


9. Sradatlon of Color 




1 JI. 


«l m. 


mw^ 1 Im 


21. 


Body Parti Fr. 


10. fletrotned 




L^rl^ 


Jk ^ 


^^m^ m m\ 


23. 


Qracs 


11. Reproductive Cell 




WK^ ■% 


wm ^ 


J^r I m ■ ■ ^ 


2U. 


Actor John 


1), hexican Food 










2S. 


hake Amends For 


lU. Deadly 










27. 
29. 

30. 


Exclamation 
Pinochle Term 
Andarson and Kcllv 


16. laeaaure of i.en#th (pi. J 
19. Oist 
22. Proclaim 


Ghost 

Judg' 


iinir spoils case 
f Brrkpley Lillv 


ClOSSi < 

night ai 


ihc city M()nf1a\ 
<l was gone by morn 


32. 

3'*. 
36. 


lilectron Tubes 
Contemporary Author 
Price 


2U. Cne-celled Animals 
26. bronte Heroine 
26. African viiia«ie 


of Rai 
Court 


i«h Cfiunty Circuit 
1 1 n f! il Miislrial in 


ing 




37. 


Joins 
Decrade 


31. Ill 

33. Postman's Beats (abbr.) 


a civil 


. is<- wlu'n a sevt-nih 


Out of 1 


.11 rv.it>; chair- she be - 
. . (1 at ^3 


<*■). 


Narrative Poem 


35. Descriptive of DarK Sky 


juror 


: ni'-d fn>m the jury 


come.v 


U6. 


Xonan" s Name 


37. Pennies 


room 
the ji! 


••H VVlTl' Otl 


Tl. 


r • i.ijl gt)ing lore) 


be. 


Source of Income 
iLveninei Var. 


36. Medicine That Soothes 
39. Potassium 


-till in «l M.'rt 


egatf 


: 1 ix'kingcluiir 


^0. 


Talk *lldly 


• 40. Party 

42. Liquor 

43. Sailors 


how 


- v'f.ih , id»nlit'it d 


says ' 


I (1. 1 I'lsenthal F ar 


52. 
S3. 


Go A.ay! 
Sailor 


as a 


irv'ss. i.'</t p;isi tlK- 


ner. 


t ar old widow 


S"*. 


Traveler 


44. Thuei 3p, 


baliff 




who i: 


Idf.st co-t'd fo- 


57. 


Suffixi Tumor 
Mile 


47. Infuriate 
51-. Leg bone 






» rolled 


il r. rnard M Bar- 


60. 


embarrasses 


54. Insect Stage 


A stini^ 


iihnul an odor 


uch C 


l!« iv '^he is taking 


62. 

63i 


Troop iincampmentt 
Bible Society 


55. Article 

56. Humor haeazine (pi.) 


It ( 


nil il slanlt and il 


English 


.Mid sociology 


6U. 


Tests 


59. Put a Strain on 


left. 


! n\ ironincnlal i-n 


courst 




65. 


Artist's tssentlal 


61. Understand 


forcer 


vt '.ffifcrs for riii- 












cago V 


i f ,»u/,zlcd a.s th«" 


Wonn 


lis lib trium;)ii;i 






" 


could 


'. lU'inttothp wealli 


again' 


litis time in ihe pr*- 




- ■ 


Solution hn pagr 8 


^r fo- 


•.U' loul .d 'f thai 


ductiun 


..f (!.iir\ foods .-\ 



IN 



spoKs.sirian lor theCustafson 
Dairy in Cireen Cove Springs. 
Florida suys that women 
have a better grip on cows 
than m«'n The production 
of the lows went up a half- 
gallon per cow per day when 
H milkmaids wer» hijred. 




< 



' 'I 




<^ 



page 10 



H 



HARBINGER 



October 29, 1973 



By CHUCK ZEMESKE 

The first series of downs 
that brought Illinois Valley 
97 yards downfield to the 
HAWK 3 yard line without 
■coring seemed to be pro- 
phetic of the game to be 
played. It was predomin- 
ately a defensive game with 
only three scores which 
left Harper on the short end, 
13-7. Lightning struck for 
the second time in three weeks 
when the HAWKS lost the 
game in the last two min- 
utes of play. 

Following the unfruitful 
downfield march, the 
Apaches then turned over 
the ball to Harper. The 
HAWKS had possession 
long enough to bring it 
out to their own 20, only 
to give it back to them. Such 
was the case throughout 
the game Sahirday night 
Illinois Valley drew first 
bl6od at 11.26 in the sec- 



Hawks shot down by Apaches 13-7 

^X ■>* ^ <» ■ . M _A.. _ 1. _ fm ■ 



ond quarter when five play 
ers (three HAWKS and two 
Apaches) went up for a pass 
by Bob Chiesi and Brian 
Phalen caught the ball in a 
crowd. After the dust settled 
and the players picked them- 
selves off the turf, Illinois 
Valley was ahead 6-0 and 
the point after made the 
score 7-0. 

Not to be outdone by the 
fickle fated Apache tribe, the 
HAWKS made their initial 
surge for a score penetrating 
from the 32 yard line of 111. 
Valley. Mike Kinney swept 
around the right end from 
23 yards out with 1:35 re- 
maining in the half. Kicker 
Kevin Wilson booted the 
typing coversion point, put- 
ting Harper back in the 
game. 7-7. 

Never giving up. 111. Val- 
ley pressed for 38 yards 
leaving them on the Harper 
25. The clock and rugged 
HAWK defense ate up 



enough time to hold them 
to a field goal attempt which 
ultimately failed. At the half 
the score remaipt^ tied at 
seven apiece. 

The HAWKS couldn't 
seem to put a drive ten 
gether, hindered by fine pass 
coverage, fumbles, intercep- 
tions, and penalties. Per- 
haps the main problem was 
that of not being mentally 
up for the game. Illinois Val- 
ley had dropped three of 
their four games played 
before taking on Harper 
in comparison to the HAWK 
record of 3-2, following a 

Hockey comes 
to Harper 

By JIM MOY 



satisfy hig 45-18 victory 
over Concordia. 

Up to the final two min- 
utes of play it seemed as 
if the game was destined to 
end hi a 7-7 deadlock. With 
the HAWKS on their own 
30. Pat Dempsey faded back 
to pass. In his desperation 
to get a pass off under 
the blitzing Apaches, he lost 
his footing precisely at the 
release of Oie ball. Apache 
Tom Reeder picked off the 
attempted pass and trotted 
in for the game winning 
touchdown. The extra point 
was blocked, but Uie dam- 
age had already taken 
It* tolL 

STATISTICS 

H 




Illinois Valley scores in a crowd. 

(Photo by Chuck ^rmeske) 

Hawks look ahead 



The HAWKS wUl take on 
the Triton Warriors this Sat- 
urday for the second of the 
last three home games. Tri- 
ton boasts a 3-3-1 record 
including victories over 
Grand Rapids who is rank- 
ed 15th in the nation, and 
Wright, who also has a fine 
record, Triton has also tied 
the number 1 state team, 
Rork Valley, this being the 



first time this year that any 
team had even tied them. 
Triton's strength JJes 
mainly in their strong de- 
fensive front which has work- 
ed effectively against the run- 
ning game of the opposition. 

Harper wUl be hosting 
the Warriors Nov. 3rd at 
Wheeling High School at 
1:30 p.m. 



$45 OOROTOMAT 
BINDINGS 

NOW S30 

$55ootyr6iia 

bindings 
NOW $40 

NEADSKIfACKACE 



SKIING 
ACCESSORIES 



(KdlS 

UllKIS 



li>i 



SAll 



•Ml •!' 



Un >3.«S 

W«i S3. 4* 

1 1. 'II $•.«« 
VIS $4.»« 



cuoj 

MA«K|« 

BINDINGS 

N(«riPOiis 

iANCiOIOlO 
•DOTS 



SI le.eo 

4S.OO 

30 OO 
*S OO 



SUPER PRO 
SKI PACKAGE 



^Aiuf $3S0 OO 
MOW $l«S.OO 



NOW S2I9 



PRO SPORT CENTER 



-M).S K. Kvp.i.,r,i. Ml Vro^^rd 



v.t\ uHtm 



This year Harper's hock- 
ey team will be coached by 
Bob I)owning. This will be 
Coach Downing's first year 
as coach here at Harper, 
and he comes to us with a 
great deal of experience. 
This includes ten years of 
playing hockey with th« 
WUmette Allstars, the Chi- 
cago Blackhawks minor 
team, the Chicago Allstar 
team, and last year Coach 
Downing played defenw; for 
Harper College. 

Coach Downing is a vet- 
eran coach of three sum- 
mer training camps and 
various coaching clinics 
in Canada. Downing's sta- 
tus as coach is unusual 
In that he is presently a 
full-time student in the trans- 
fer program. 

Anyone interested in play- 
ing hockey can contact 
Mr. Kearns or Coach Down- 
ing in F345. Tryouts wUl be 
held Nov. 6 and 8 at 8:00 
a.m., at tile Rolling Meadows 
Ice Arena. 



First downs 14 

Rushing 6 

Passing 4 

Penalty 4 

Yards gained 240 
Rusing 203 

Passing 37 

Passes, attempted 13 
Completed 4 

Had intercepted 2 

Punts, number 5 

Average distance 



I.V. 
13 
7 
6 
1 
271 
153 
118 
14 
7 
2 
4 



(in yards) 46.4 48.5 

Fumbles, number 3 2 

Recovered 

(by opponents) 2 i 
Penalties, number 8 15 

Yards penalized 80 175 

INDIVIDUAL 

RUSHING 
HARPER: 

Jim Leopardo, 17 carries 
for 81; Mike Kinney, 12 car- 
ries for 67; Kevin Lio, 4 
carries for 24; Steve Fran- 
kovic. 2 carries for 11; 
Marty Williams, 6 carrtes 
for 21. 

ILLINOIS VALLEY: 

J. Wakey, 24 carries for 
84; D. Dillard. 12 carries 
for 39, T. Pumo. 7 carries for 
27. 

HARPER 7 0-7 
ILL.VAL. 7 6 - 13 
HARPER - Kinney. 23 yard 

run/WUson kick after TI). 
ILL. VAL. - 20 yard pass 

completion from Chiesi to 

Brian Thalen/ Wey kick 

after TD. 
Reeder run from 10 yards 

out following Interception 

/kick blocked. 




Hawk hockey schedule 



I 



Games 

•Dec. 16 - Jollet Collie - 
Rolling Meadows Ice 
Arena (Home), 4:30p.m. 
•Jan. 5 - Morton Grove Col- 
lege (Home), 4:30 p.m. 
•Jan. 19 - U. of Wis (Park- 
side) (Home). 4:30 p.m. 
Jan. 22 - Morton Grove - 
Willow Springs, 4:00 p.m. 
♦Feb. 2 - DuPage College 
(Home), 4:30 p.m. 
Feb. 10 - U. of W. (Park- 
side) Kenosha, 6:00 p.m. 
•Feb. 16 - Triton College 
(Home), 4:30p.m. 
Feb. 17- DuPage.Lyle, 1:00 
p.m. 

Feb. 22 - Triton - Park 
Ridge (Oakton). 12:30 
p.m. 



Feb. 26 - Joliet Joliet . 
4:00 p.m. 
'March 2 - .Morraine Val- 
ley (Home). 4:30 p.m. 

•Home Gamex 
Admission - Adults $1 00 
Students (w I.D.) FH> 
Children 25 

Try-outs - Nov. 6 & 8, 

8:00 a.m. at Home 
Practices: Tues. & Thurs., 
8:00-9:00 a.m. 
Skating Class - T & R, 
9:00-10:30 a.m. 
(Registi-ation Open to ALL 
students). 

For more information, see 
Mr. Kearns in F345 ( facul- 
ty advisor) or Bob Downing 
(coach). 



I To promote spirit and j 
I involve students in the sup- | 
I port of (he athletic program I 
, at Harper, a proposal for j 
I the establishment of a chal- , 
I lenge cup has been put be- | 
j fore the student senate. As to I 
J whether or not this should • 
J be established, and whether ! 
I this shall be a challenge cup | 
J trophy or a symbol of the | 
j rivalry between Harper and I 
I Triton is for you, (he student { 
I to decide. Vote on the propos- ! 
I ed idea. j 



□ 



No 




j Yes 

I Trophy wHh symbol 



j Symbol j j | 

I I 1 I 

I Drop off at Harbinger office. ! 
I Room A367. j 

L_ j 



t 



/^ 



Wll' 



^ 



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/ 



; 



T€ 



H/RBINGSi 

William Rainey Harper College. Algonquin and Roselle Roads, Palatine, Illinois 60067, 312-397-3000 



Vol. 7, No 8 



November 5, 1973 



Bella Abzug to visit Harper 



Congregswoman Bella Ab- 
zug of New York will lec- 
ture at Harper College, 
Thursday, November 8, in 
the College Center at 8 p.m. 

Public admission is $1.50 
for adults and 75 cents for 
students. Harper students, 
faculty and staff are ad- 
mitted free with ID. 

Bella Abzug has the en- 
ergy and drive, and w«>rks 
harder than any three oth- 
er people. Why? Because she 
believes with her whole heart 
and soul ip what she is do- 
ing. » 

Bella Abzug has spoken 
fur the unrepresented in Am- 
erica, the women, minorities 
and the young people. She 
has spoken for the people 
in her district, and in the 
cities, and the people have 
listened and responded. 

They havN listened and 
responded when she has 
called for an immediate end 
to the tragic war in \'iet- 
nam. They have listened and 
responded when, after the 
resumption of the bombing 
of North Vietnam, and the 
mining of the harbors, she 
called for the Impeachment 
of ttte President. They have 
listened and responded when 



she has called for. greater 
numbers of women partici- 
pating in all levels of gov- 
ernment, and they have lis- 
tened and responded when 
she has called for an end to 
all types of discrimination. 

She has been the voice of 
the people on behalf of the 
Jews in the Soviet Union 
who wish to emigrate, and 
has actively supported all 
the defense needs that Israel 
has requested. She has per* 
sonally raised over $100,- 
000 for Israeli bonds, and 
personally intervened with 
Ambassador £)obrynin in 
the case of Leonard Riger- 
man. 

^he also found time to write 
a book about her experiences 
in Washington as a first- 
term Congresswoman. Pub- 
lished by Saturday Review 
Press, her book. Bella: Ms. 
Abzug Goe« To Washington, 
records her fights with both 
'her friends and enemies in 
Congress and out and re- 
veals the more personal side 
of her life, how her two 
daughters view her activ- 
ities, and how her husband 
reacts to her new situation. 
Born in the Bronx, as Bel- 
la Stavisky, daughter of the 



New distri€t phn$ annoniKed 



With the passage of Senate 
Bill 1188 guidelines have been 
established for the district- 
ing of many areas now out- 
side of the various Junior 
College districts in the state 

Each undistricted high 
school district in the stale 
had two options The first 
was to petition the Illinois 
Junior College Board The 
second is to wait until Jan- 
uary of this year to hear the 
ruling of the IJCB and allow 
them to place the high school 
district in a Junior College 
District 

This ruling directly af- 
fects the Harper District 



The High School districts on 
the Eastern edge of the Har- 
per district are at this time 
not in any Junior College 
district 

These districts include 
Lake Forest. Highland 
Park. New Trier. Glenbrook. 
and Evanston As of yet. 
these districts have not dec- 
ided which Junior Col- 
lege they will be going with 

Under the new law. the 
deadline for these districts 
to file for their choice o( 
Junior College District, has 
expired What Junior Col- 
lege District that will 
receive them, will be decid- 
ed by the IJCB 






Live and Let Live Meat 
Market owner, she attended 
public schools in the Bronx 
and Hunter College in New 
York City. She went to Col- 
umbia Law School, where 
she was an editor of the 
Columbia Law Review. 

In the early 60*8, she be- 
came active in the early 
peace movement by found- 
ing Women Strike for Peace. 
She organized and led mass 
lobbies to Washington for 
the nuclear test ban treaty, 
disarmament, and an im- 
mediate end to the war in 
Vietnam. 

Elected to Congress in 



Ornftf froMMig c»«rst 
$ffered of Htirp9r 

A course at Harper de- 
signed to prepare students 
for their State Driver s Ex- 
amination, is currently of- 
fered Thursday evenings 
from 6 to 8 pm thru Jan 
10 The first session met 
last Thursday, bit students 
can still register 

Tuition is $28 for district 
residents plus $22 in addit- 
ional costs Students can 



L' 








register the nt<»hf of 
class at the Office of Con- 
tinuing Education in the 
College Center (Building A) 
The class meets in Room • 
F303 

The course covers all 
basic knowledge and sub- 
ject matter needed by the 
student to pass the State 
Drivers Exarpination A 
lat ses;:ion pro idespractice 
driving ant] highway exper- 
ience in a late model car 
under the direction of a skil- 
led and considerate instruc- 
tor. 

For further information, 
call 397.1000. ex. 301 



November 1970. Bella made 
a determined effort to be 
appointed to the House Arm- 
ed Services Committee. Al- 
though this campaign did 



not succeed, she was appoint- 
ed to two important com- 
mittees, namely Government 
Operation and Public 
Works, . 




Congre«Kwoman Bella Abzug 

Student representotive to 
be placed on Harper Board 



Harper students will once 
again have the opportunity 
to voice their opinions. This 
time as to the method of de- 
termining the selection of a 
student representative to be 
seated on the Board of Trus- 
tees. Although, he will be a 
non-voting member, the stu- 
dent representative will have 
the advantage of express- 
ing student opinion before 
the administration. 

On November 13 and 14 
a referendum will be conduct- 
ed as to whether the student 



rep. should be appointed by 
the Student Senate, or to be 
elected by popular vote by 
the student body. 

Triton College of River 
r.rove, Illinois is in the pro- 
cess of setting up a refer- 
endum such as Harper's. 

Parkland Community Col- 
lege, Champaign, Illinois, 
has already taken action 
on this matter. The Student 
Executive Board appointed 
their Student Government 
President to be seated on the 
Board. 



Students favor 
Nixon impeachment 



The results of the poll 
taken last week in the I'nr 
bingor showed that 73.6 
percent of the people 
responding to the poll were 
for impeachment while 26.4 
percent were agamst 

Contrasted against a poll 



taken in the Chicago Sun- 
Times which showed that 86 
percent of the people polled 
were pro- impeachment, 

tends to show that the Har- 
per student community is 
more conservative than 
many of the people in the 
Chicago area. 



> 



L 



V 



r 



\ 



^ 



o 



Page 2 



T€ 



H/1RBINGER 



•> 



November 5, 1973 



If you plan to graduate 
at the end of the Fall Sem- 
ester, please contact Admis- 
sions Office, and obtain a 
Petition for Graduation and 
file the fojMn with the Ad- 
missions Office as soon as 
possible. 

For further information, 
contact the Admissions Of- 
fice, 397-3000. Ext 208 



Bluegrass caps Homecoming 




Earl K4'ru}{){s 

(••ho(o by Paul Cord) 




THIS LITTLE PIGGY 
IS GOING TO 

BTTHISIATOr TOW PAHTS 

FOR THEIR 

Anniversary 

Buy any pair of Pants 

and rmc9iv0 FREE 

a Belt of your 

choice. 

Good Nov. 5, 6, A 

7 Onlyl 

(8AI.E PANTS KXCI.l'DED) 



BY THI SEAT OF TODH PAHTS 



Sf N •onmmiPMJkrmm 
IMDit to oarr NKun vnM fMi 



MOum MOM . TUfS 
PHONE WED n •• ». THURS 

mnM ' rnt n i* t. »at w 

TO* 



By E. K. Sinnott 

Harper College was well 
honored last Saturday night 
with the concert appearance 
of the Earl Scruggs Revue 
Although my admitted ig- 
norance of the country music 
scene allows me to rem- 
ember ScrtJggs onlyfromhis 
cameo spots on the Beverly 
Hillbillies TV series. liaiow 
that he is well appreciated 
fjy many contemporary mus- 
icians 

However. Scruggs seems 
(if Saturday night was a 
typical example) to be less 
interested in his own stage 
presence than in that at 
his two sons, who are col- 
lectively trying to become 
sons- at country stars - 
country ■ rocit stars in the 
Arlo Guthrie tradition Ar- 
lo's famed parent was lessa 
part of his act. though, and 
apparently the Scruggs name 
is Must not in a largeenough 
category to attract new 
fans to his son& without an 
appearance by father Earl 



Leadership 
seminar 



Levi's 

for an 
shapes- 



W» v» 901 you covered 
',*. f T^ , world s gtfate%t 
of Levi s Ovpf 
4 ton* per slorp Levi s 'or 
gait Levi s Sta Pr<»«t 
rT-ifs And Ion* more 
" «i * all we carry -Levi % 
' it m>»»a tit 



^:i 




Millhrook (Coif Mill) 
Nileji, III. 967-5596 



So Earl Scruggs sunds in 
the center of the stage, as 
still and silent as marble, 
cautiously shifting his bar 
ren facial expressions out 
upon the audience, like a 
country and western Ed Sul- 
livan His banjo and gui- 
tar picking are. of course, 
impeccable, always la id back 
and cleanly timed. while 



maintaining a relaxed flow, 
only increasing the paradox 
of his seeming lack of self 
assurance 

If Earl's behavior seem- 
ed somewhat less than cas- 
ual, his sons did little to 
warm up the act. which was 

almost no act Like their 

parentage, they seemed to 

be well schooled in the art 

of guitar with son Randy 

playing lead and Gary pro- 
viding adequate bass runs 

and burnt out vocals 

If I appear bemused. I 
also er\joyed myself thor- 
oughly, as did nearly every- 
one else, if the overwhelm- 
ing audience reaction can be 
taken as a measure 

Perhaps some of us tend 
to associate country 

sounds as a group of right 
wing preachers with glitter- 
ing psuedo- cowboy clothes 
and their names written on 
the necks of their 1940 Gib- 
son guitars 

Earl Scruggs wastruely 
different He s an individual 
who is refreshing in the cur 

rent era of guitar egoman X'h^' ^ \iiun\M ^^ 
lacs and hip stage ,<S^X 



municators 



The need for a student 
Leadership Workshop at 
Harper has been facilitated 
by forming the Student Lead- 
ership Seminar The staff 
consists of Mr Frank Bor- 
elli. Mrs. Joyce Nolan, Mr 
John Papendrea. and Mr 
Phil Troyer 

The planning of the 
seminars will be held ever>' 
Tuesday morning from 8 30 
to 10:00 in the Student Ac 
tivities Office One member 
of the Workshop staff will 
visit the respective organ- 
izations to explain the ob- 
jectives and to familiarize 
themselves to the various 
organization^ at Harper 
The first workshop will be 
held on Thursday, November 
29. from 8 00 am to 4 30 
p m. 

Objectives of the seminar 
are outlined in six steps 
1 To unify student organ 
izations by sharing objec- 
tives, problems, and ideas 
among the Student Senate 
HARBINGER, Program 

other 
student organizations 



Earl Scruggs and his revue 
may not have caused anyone 
to rush out and get a wall 
paster from their stage act. 
bul they certainly were the 
best sound that Harper 
has yet heard 



Karl ScruggH Rpview 





^ CCHLin TUNE-UP KITS 

Hr» CONTAINS H D JOINTS, CONDENSER, SPARK PLUGS 

Mon. thru Fri. i» 

Sal •4, Swn fU '•tyl S6.9S «cyt $7.95 tcyl. 910.95 



YOU SAVE 

50% 



I 



PALATINE AUTOMOTIVE SUPPLY CO, 

S46 E. NORTHWEST HWY. PALATINE 



CTi hy Paul ConI) 



OOPS! 

An error was made in The 
October 29 edition concern- 
ing the date classes are to 
begin for the 8 week mini 
courses. 

Classes will begin Nov 5 
and run through Jan 18. 
Registration can be made up 
until the first day of class. 



2. To provide an oppor- 
tunity for members of the 
student organizations to be 
come better acquainted and 
to relate to one another as 
individuals 

3 To examine the struc 
ture and relationship of the 
major student organizations 
within student activities 

4 To explore new techni- 
ques of reaching the student 
body for resources and com- 
mitment on new programs 

5 To improve individual 
effectiveness in working 
with others in group situa 
tions and on a one to one 
basis 

6. To examine the deci- 
sion- making process and 
related factors such is 
delegation, reaching agree 
ments. leadership styles, 
individual needs of group 
etc 

These seminars afford 
an excellent opportunity to 
become familiar with Har 
per's organizations Not 
only will they find out that 
these organizations exist, 
but involving themselves 
will allrm thetn to discov 
er how the ore- livaiions in- v 
terr \i.w witi, the scl.nol ^ 
and themselves 



INDUSIRIES 



3 




)000 east Central 
Arlington Heights, III. 



ARCHITPXT AND KXGIXEERIXG 
ANT COMMERCIAL ARTjVIATERIALS 

■*• WF: HAVF: 



I.KTRA.SKT 
MAGIC MARKF.RS 
CHART PAK 



BlNGFANi; 

Pad« 
Paper 
Clearprini 
Techniral pitp<"- 



November 5, 1973 



Scholorships 



By Larry Kiel 



Scholarships are once 
again being offered to stu- 
dents who wish to enter 
the fields of construction. 
or civil engineering 

These scholarships, worth 
up to $4,000. are being of- 



Hot lines 
really help 

"Pumphouse Hotline." 
Tony" 

"Hello, my name s Sue. 
I'm 17 and I think I'm pre- 
gnant." 

This could be the begin- 
ning of a typical call at the 
Pumphouse Hotline, in Mt 
Prospect People call the 
Hotline with problems and 
the staff try to help them 
make some important decis- 
ions They do not give dir - 
ect advice, but they only 
function in a facilitative cap- 
acity, that is, they help peo 
pie discover the alternatives 
to their problems and make 
their own decisions 

It takes people to help 
people, and the pumphouse 
needs people to help carry 
out the hotline purpose. per- 
haps you could be one of 
those people Not everyone 
Is qualified to work on a hot- 
line It takes a special 
type of person, a person in- 
terested in working with 
other people. 

Pumphouse stresses hon- 
esty Upon entering the 
door you are givenpermiss 
ion to be honest Pump- 
house philosophy states that 
on the phones of the hot- 
line one needs to be honest 
to avoid leading the caller 
off from his problem Per- 
sons interested in learning 
more of the Pumphouse phil 
osophy can attend their 
training program Nov 1 TTie 
training session is led by 
speca lists in the fields of 
suicide, transactional 

analysis, sex. and commun- 
tlon techniques For more 
information and to sign up 
for the couse interested 
persons can call 259-7184 



fered by the Associated 
General Contractors of 
America High School Sen- 
iors and college Freshmen 
and Sophomores are eligible 
to compete. 

Selections are based on 
a demonstrated interest in a 
W"eer in the construction 
in^stry. academic per- 
foi'mance. financial need, 
extra curricular activities 
and a personal interview 
Last year, nearly 200 stu- 
dents received the scholar- 
ship, which amounts to$l.- 
000 per year, for up to four 
years 

Applications are available 
by writing, or calling the 
Central Illinois Builders of 
the Associated General Con- 
tractors, 525 Jefferson 
West. Springfield. Illinois 
62702 The phone number 
Is Area Code 217. 522- 
4446 

Applications must be In 
by December 1, 1973 The - 
winners will be announced 
at the Annual Convention of 
the AGC next March in 
San Diego. California 



¥€ 



H/1RBINGER 



Student 

activities 

Mget 



For those of you who won- 
der where your activity fee 
around her e goes, here is 
the student activity budget 
for this year. 

STUDENT ACTIVITY BUDGET 
1973-74 

Student Senate 
Office Supplies 
Travel 

Special Projects 
Leadersiiip Workshops 
Capital Outlay 
i'aid Student Secretary 



Colours 
in concert 



Program Board 
Dance* 
Concerts 

A/lernoon Activiti< 
Films 
Supplies 
Travel 

Christmas Party 
-^Open Market 

Cultural Arts Series 
Lectures 
Art Kxhibits - 
Film Series 
Harper Players 

Student I'ubHcaliuns 
Harbiniier 
Point of View 



S 5(H). 

1.50C 

1,175. 

1,000. 
5(K). 

1.500. 
•6.175. 



2.400. 

9.000. 
es 2.4(M) 

i.:hh) 

5U0. 
750. 
250. 
400. 
1 17.000. 

9.000. 
1. 000. 
1,000. 
1.800. 
•21.800. 

5.:t(H). 

3,(NH) 

$8,300. 

3.000. 



COLOURS, a new coun 
try rock group, classified 
In the same category as 
the Birds, appears in con 
cert in the Harper Lounge 
on Friday. Nov 9 at 8 p m 
The group includes John 
Cable on lead guitar. Mark 
Parker on Bass and Cel- 
lo. Jim Ratts on rh\thm 
guitar and Gordon Parrish 
on rhythm and siee! gui- 
tars Other *nstriin'ea:s us- 
ed in the total soi't -re ac- 
oustic end telecaster 

Thfc three lead vocals plus 
1' strong arrangements of 
their own music and that of 
other major artists in the 
country rock field are fresh 
and innovative 

The group is from Texas 
and has appeared with the 
Earl Scruggs Revue and the 
Nitty Gritty Dirt Band 

Tickets for Harper stu 
dents with ID are $1 00 
and for the community. $2 00 
- contact Student Activities 
Bldg A Rm 337. 



SpcKh ActivMiw 
Student OrRanizaUons - 

Club Fund 
Cheer le ad iitc 
Pom Von 
Inlramurats 
Student Awards 
Student Handbook 
Student 11) Cards 
I'rintinK 

Tuition Rebates 
Radio Station. WHCM 
Health Service 
Intercollegiate Athletics 22.00(1 

TOTAL SI 10.000. 

May 17. 1973 



775. 

100 

300. 
6.400. 

850. 
4.500. 
3.500. 
2.800. 
2,700. 
6.000. 
3.800 



Page 3 



iP-Aeta o-f, the UUxk 




This is our first selection 
for Photo of the Week 

If you have some photogra - 
phic work, which you deem 
worthy of publication, drop it 
by our office, A367. Your 
work will be returned to you. 
if you pick it up with in a week 
after you submit it. — 



Material does not have to 
pertain to Harper, we only 
ask that it be in good 
taste The decision of the 
staff is final 

This photo was taken bv 
MIKE WELLMAN. who also 
happens to be a member of 
the staff 



Tennis offered 



Lj^wrtnce R Kin 

PHOTOGRAPHER 



asB-sat* 



Harper's first intrarnuial 
tennis tournament was con- 
cluded Tuesday. (Xrtober30. 
Ten women began the Round 
Robin competition October 
25. The 21 Vaaa scoring sys- 
tem was used. 

Kathy Zyrkowskl, a for- 
mer Maine West student, took 
the honors with 123 points. 
Linda Ahrens and Harbara 
Tliornwald had identical 
scores of 120 at the end of 
the competition, and a sud- 
den death playofTfound Miss 
Ahrens the victor for the sec- 
ond place finish, .Miss Thorn- 
wald third. 

Other participants and 
scoring included Linda 
Warner (69). Dawn .Stead- 
man (57), Kim Becker (75). 
Sue Board (53). ( arol Ven- 



eer (35), Judy Aston (78), 
and Mary Schwartz (100). 

Miss -Holt was extreme- 
ly pleated with the level 
of competition during this 
lournamenl, and wiii be 
looking forward lo having 
another tournament in the 
spring. 



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Page 4 



T€ 



H/«?BINGER 



November 5, 1973 




^N4 



OUTPUT- 



The Student Senate of this Community College will be 
holding a meeting this Thursday, November 8, 12:30 
In Room A-241 A & B, one of the topics that will 
be brought up is whether or not to continue the present 
College policy of tuition rebates. 

We at the HAKBIN'Gi-:K feel that this measure should 
be defeated, and that the present policy should be up- 
held. 

The reasons for this motion were explained to us by 
Student Senator Mclntyre. His reasoning seems to be 
a little unclear, and some of his grounds seem to be 
shakey. He states that the present policy is nothing 
more than a method of payment to the students in- 
volved, and that the quality of work received would be 
better. If the work done was on a volunteer basis. 

With the number of hours put in by various members 
of various organizations, this would be a step back- 
wards. Some of these people, due to the time that they 
put In, are unable to hold jobs, and of consequence, 
they financially suffer. They are rewarded by these re- 
AtM, and these reblRles alone. 

The service that they render to the school Is Im- 
measurable, in time, and in effort. Mo»t realize that the 
chances of their receiving a rebate is slim, and yet, they 
continue to produce. 

The rebate, is given by the school, is hardly just, when 
one looks at the number of hours put in by a Student 
Senate President, or an YAWox of this newspaper. The 
hours are long, and the rewards are few. 

As to Mr. Mclntyre's allegation that the quality of the 
positions would improve. If there is no form of renumer- 
ation, one must ask what backing he has for this. It is 
beyond comprehension, that If you cut the rewards, you 
can still reap a good quality product, or even one bet- 
ter. 

Mr. Mclntyre's proposal Is similar to General Motors 
replacing the present steel, and aluminum automobiles 
with one made out of chicken wire, and tin foil. True, 
the product would be lighter, cheaper, and easier to main- 
tain, but (IM would go out of business in a hurry, as 
the quality of this new, safe, and cheaper automobile 
would not be able to provide the function that It was 
designed for. 

A total volunteer arrangement would not only prove 
to be fatal to alot of the organizations, but to the stu- 
dent body as a whole, for they would have to pay the 
price of such a itiotlon. j^ 

We urg'e all members of the student body to attend 
student senate meetings, and make their opinions heard 
on this and fni matters. 



>INPUT 



> 



ClbavvfMfsf rep/ffs 

1 wish to thank Ms. Mal- 
ecki for her beautiful let- 
ter which appeared in theOc- 
tober 29 edition of this pub- 
lication Some of the lines 
in that letter will rank as 
classics in my memory. 

1 would like to ask her. 
when we had our last date? 
I don't remember when it 
was It is obvious that we 
had one. because she ap- 
parently has gone out with 
me. I draw this cotx^lusion 
from the line that she used. 
"What did you expect? Nev- 
ermind, I know wluii. you ex- 
pect " Altho she appears 
to have knowledge of my so- 
cial habits. I must say that 
she does not. I will make 
available a list of girls that 
I have dated in the past two 
yrt?^ to her. and she can 
see if I was indeed the sex 
maniac that she implies that 
I am INDEED! 

In fact, I don't even know 
what this Ms. Malecki, looks 
like. I don't know if I would 
want to either 

She has made some pret- 
ty heavy statements a long the 
lines that a housewife has it 
rough 1 suppose that she 
is backing this statement up 
with a few years of exper- 
ience. Tell me, Ms Malecki, 
how many children do you 
have'?' I doubt if you have 
any 

About her statement of the 
$40 date, she seems to think 
that this doesn't happen un- 
der the age of 25. Tell me 



Moififeffoiire 

The cartoon (HARBINGER. 
Oct 23, pg 1) which ac 
companies the article about 
the Harper maintenance staff 
and depicts the union mem- 
ber as an illiterate, unkept 
individual is an insult It is 
an irresponsible slam 
against a large number of 
hard working, intelligent 
people The implicationcar- 
ried by the cartoon is that 
the maintenance at Harper 
is "like that cartoon char- 
acter As a member of 
the Clas.sified Employee 
Council. 1 resent that im- 
plication and ask you to 
apologize to the mamten- 
ance staff in particular 
and to union members in 
general 

(Editor's note: It appears 
that the contents of the 
cartoon were taken too ser- 
iously for its intended pur 
pose Cartoons add humor 
to what might be a dull top- 
ic. For those who fail to 
have a sensed humor - It 
is not the intention of this 
paper to degrade any fac- 
tion of working people). 



Ms. Malecki. did you go to 
your High School Prom? I 
did. I have also taken girls 
out to eat at rather expen- 
sive places, and then down to 
one of the plays in Chicago 
1 was under 19 at the time, 
so I guess that disproves 
your statement. (Hell didn't 
freeze over either.) 

In the past year or so, I 
have limited my date ex- 
penditures to a minimum, 
as there are very few girls 
that I know that are worth 
the expenditure of more than 
a few dollars on. In fact, 
of all the females that I 
know, there is only one that 
I am willing to spend more 
than five dollars on 

As to her bit about Adam 
and Eve, I do not see how 
you can blame me for the 
way that the Bible is writ- 
ten. I do not remember talk- 
ing to the author of the book 
of Genesis I am sure that 
he had his reasons for 
making it Adam and Eve, 
rather than Eve and Adam 
There again, she is holding 
me responsible for some- 
thing that I had no control 
over. How can I argue with 
something so illogical? 

As far as the female 
being placed on a pedestal, 
she asks me. Who put us 
there?" To this, I can only 
say that I have no knowledge 
of this subject, and that I 
know for a fact that I am 
not the guilty one 

She further has the au- 



dacity to expect me to be- 
lieve that as she puts it, 
"I would rather pay the mon- 
ey." Who does she think 
she is kidding? I don't be- 
lieve it. I suggest that the 
next time you and your boy- 
friend go out. that you pay, 
I don't mean this to be a one 
shot deal either, bit rather 
a longtime arrangement. See 
how easy it is to play the 
man's role. Are you willing 
to do that? I doubt it. 

If you wish to continue to 
sling mud. insults, and in- 
sinuations, you will find that 
I am qi4te a formidable foe 
I question your age, and 
experience with the subject 
that you chose to do battle 
in. 

My final remarks for this 
issue will be simple, I feel 
that too many people have 
forgotten what courtesy is. I 
open doors for females 
as an act of courtesy. I 
open doors, building doors, 
help them with their coats, 
buy them things, and all the 
rest out of forxlness and 
courtesy for them If this 
makes me a Male Chauvin- 
ist, then I am truly proud 
to wear that title. 

M Chauvinist, 
Larry Kiel 
PS Seeing as to how you 
don I even know what my act 
is. how can you say "You'd 
better clean up your act." 
I wonder where you mind is 
at, to think something like 
that. Could it be where you 
THINK mine is'' 




«H/I?BINGER if: 



Kdltor-in-chief 
Managing Kditor 
Business Manager 
\ews Kditor 
Features Kditor 
.Xttivities Kditor 
Sports Kditor 
Cartoon Kditor 
Photo Kditor 
Photographers: 



Diane DiBartoiomeo 
I.. K. Kiel 
Gary Zdeh 

.lim Moy 
Uoii Zoberls 
Heidi .lohnson 
Phil Battaglia 
Dennis Murray 

Greg ( (inwa\ and (buck Zemeske 
Paul Cord. Ken Kissam. .Mike 
Weilman 



Contributing .Staff 
Mary Beth Christy. Dave Gordon, Frank .McGovern, Sue 
Pollack. Sf..,- Schlo«s<?r. K. K. Sinnntt, Bill Whitehead 
(ieorge Polales 111, Rich Kusnierek 

Advisor - Mr. Sturdevant 

The HAKBI.\(;Ki{ is the student publication for the 
Harper College campus community, published weekly 
except during holidays and mid-terms. All opinions ex- 
pressed on the editorial page or in the columns are 
those of the writer, and are not necessarily those of the 
college, itsSidministration, faculty or student body. 

For information on advertising, rates and publica- 
tion schedule, call or write Harbinger Business Of- 
fice, 

William Kainey Harper College. Algonquin and 
Bosellc Kds.. Palatine. Illinois 60067. I'hone num- 
b.-r 397-3000, ext. 272 and 460. 



November 5, 1973 



K 



H/4?BINGER 



Page 5 



Seekers plan expansion liMm sports fadHty €onstn€tioii 



By HEIDI JOHNSON 

What i8"Seeker8"?Seeker8 
is an informal group of Har- 
per students whose purpose 
is to seek to know themselves 
and experience a relevant, 
meaningful relationship to 
God and others through 
Jesus Christ, Seekers is an 
interdenominational group, 
the members are encouraged 
to remain in, or become ac- 
tive in their church. Denom- 
inational differences are not 
emphasized. The Meadows 
Baptist Church sponsors 
Seekers and provides a cam- 
pus pastor and lends general 
support. It has no control 
over the group, except 
through the influence of the 
campus pastor and/or indi- 
vidual Seeker members. 

Seekers consists of two 
main groups. There are 
small Seeker groups (up to 
12 people), who are already 
committed to Christ or are 
the way to commitment, and 
have no major hang-ups. 
The groups meet weekly in 
homes for two or three hours 
of rapping, Bible study, and 



conversational prayer. 
Some topics discussed are: 
self concept, self understand- 
ing, and Christian identity, 
the purpose and meaning of 
goals in life; does- prayer 
change things? How to pray 
and others. Currentiy there 
are are four of these groups, 
one each Monday through 
Thursday nights. Anyone is 
welcome to visit a group, 
but members attend regular- 
ly, and pray for each other 
during the week. Discussions 
are coordinated with the 
campus pastor ( Max Rosen- 
quist). 

The other group is design- 
ed especially for those not 
yet committed to Christ but 
searching. The purpose is to 
discuss questions concern- 
ing Christian beliefs and 
commitment to Jesus. 

Kach group has at least 
one student, who is commit- 
ted to Christ, and a well- 
informed discussion leader. 
Some discussion topics are: 
The Process of Seeking to 
know God and Uie status and 
function of doubt; What is 
Involved In becoming a Fol- 



Stwleiit Senate meeting 



By DIANE D. BARTOLOMEO 

Many constructive pro- 
posals and resolutions were 
passed at the October 25 Stu- 
dent Senate Meeting 

Senators Tom Trunda and 
Treasurer Mark Goldsmith 
and Marily Watts, apolitical 
science student were sel- 
ected to represent Harper at 
The United Nations Or 
ganlzation in Pittsburg The 
Senate will fund one half 
of the expense with the stu- 
dents matching it half way. 
A report was given by 
Mark Tabac, concerning the 
IIT tricycle race in which 
Hfirper placed f>th 

A list of twelve faculty 
members were dt*awn up to 
be submitted to the Faculty 
Senate for the appointment 
of one faculty member to 
serve on the Student Con- 
duct Commission Those 
names on the list to be con- 
sidered were; Dr. James 
Arnesen, Mr. Daniel Cohen, 
Mr. Stephen Franklin. Mr 
La rry King. Dr Susan Kor - 
bel. Mr Kurt Meyers, Dr 
Robert Moriarity, Mr Nor- 
ris, Mr Michael Ostrowskl. 
Dr Frank Smith and Mr. 



Gilbert TIemey and Ms 

Mary Waite 

Appointed to the Conduct 
Commission wereStanSap- 
ieha and Jim Richter 

Dave Hanneman was ap- 
pointed to The Institutional 
Commission on Athletics. 

Senators voted to fund $116 
for a person to represent 
Harper at the U S. National 
Student Association Mid 
west Conference In Indiana 
That person is Robert Hay- 
hurst. Student Senate Presi- 
dent 

Forty - five dollars was 
funded to the Ski Club for 
3 of its members to attend 
a convention. 

The idea for some kind of 
a trophy or symbol for the 
Harper /Triton FB game was 
supported by Senate 

A mini course in sign 
language was funded com- 
pletely at $100 by a request 
from Ms McKay 

Students are still needed 
on the Publication Board and 
are encouraged to contact 
Bob Hayhurst in the senate 
office next to Student Activit- 
ies 



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lower of Christ as stated In 
the Old Testament: Advan- 
tages and Disadvantages of 
becoming a Christian, and 
the Nature and Function of 
Faith as related to religious 
and nonreligious aspects of 
Life. 

There U also "Seekers 11", 
for non-Harper students, 
and they hope to establish 
small Seeker groups for 
adults. Some Seekers are 
also on die staff of The 
Lost and Found Coffee 
House, which has music and 
rap sessions every Friday 
and Saturday nights, from 8- 
11:30. It is located at 2113 
S. Arlington Heights Road, 
betweem Golf and Algon- 
quin, just North of the Brass 
Rail. 

Seekers also sponsor sev- 
eral activities, of which the 
Booklable is probably most 
well known. 

Seekers usually has par- 
ties once a month, and a 
weekend conference each 
fall and spring, whkh is 
held in Wisconsin at Lake 
Geneva. (>ther meetings are 
held throughout the year 
and camping and canoe 
trips are planned for the 
summer. 

"Life of Jesus" is a ten- 
week, non-credit course that 
Seekers has arranged this 

(Turn to page Hf 



By 

DIANE DiBARTOLOMEO 

Have you been worxlering 
what that odd looking struc- 
ture going up between build- 
ings A and B- Campus secur- 
ity is for"* Wonder no longer, 
it is the new interim facil- 
ity, building U. which will 
provide 160 square feet of 
classroom and activity space 
plus 15 shov%ers. P E stor- 



age, locker space, mainten- 
ance shops, and storage for 
the book store 

The bricks, which were 
estimated to have been put 
In November 20, have been 
started already October 30. 
Mr Donald M Misic, Di- 
rector of Business Services, 
claimed that the interim 
building would be completed 
and ready for second sem- 
ester in January ot '74 



PartTime Positions 

Looking for EXTRA MONEY for the Holidays? 

Check wifh Unitod Parcel Servico for job 
opportunitiof. 

ExcelUnt Pay $4.84 por hour. Shift hour. 
3:30 a.m.-8:30 a.m. . 10:30 o.m. - 3:30 p.m 
»0:00 p.m. - 2:30 o.m 

Dclivenf Drivers 

Unltod Parcel Sorvico nood. drivers to 
operato modium six* vohiclos to make pick- 
ups and delivorios in this oroo. W» oHor 
$5.82 pmr hour to start. Must be 21 yoors 
or ovor, good physical condiHon and sof* 
driving record. 

Interested applicants should apply at 2525 Sher- 
mer IW.. Northbrook. III. Monday thru Wednes 
aay, » «.„. . j p^ . Thursday 4 - 9 p.m.; Sat. 
o a.m. - 1 p.m. 




AS QUICK AS NEVER 

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They will design jewelry to your 
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J) — 



f 

Page 6 



TC 



Euclid to be extended 



Hy4RBINGER 



November 5, 1973 



By JIM MOY 

Students living in the area 
northeast from Harper and 
who have to live with the 
narrow roads and the con- 
struction on Algonquin and 
Roselle roads may get some 
relief in the near future. 

The state of Illinois is 
going to extend Euclid road 
from its present position to 
Roselle Road with an ad- 
ditional entrance into Harper 



from the north end of the 
campus. Bids on the cons- 
truction begin on Nov. 1 with 
the contract being awarded in 
mid- December. The pro- 
ject is expected to be com- 
pleted within one to two 
years. 

The Euclid road extension 
is to be a four lane high- 
way and is expected to re- 
lieve a considerable amount 
of the traffic that now clogs 
up Algonquin road. 



Stansbury 
ntonnts trip 

By DENNIS MURRAY 

Mr. Donn B. Stansbury, 
Director of Admissions and 
Registrations, recently vis- 
ited and studied the educat - 



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i your class act togethei 

... in Levi's Panateia Siadcs 




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He wasn't really a bad 
Icid. You certainly wouldn't 
have called him uncontrol- 
able. The circumstances to 
which he was subjected could 
have really caused a big 
behavioral problem, but no 
such problems developed. 

I can remember watching 



Stansbury 
(Photo by Dennis Murray) 

ional systems in the Scan- 
dinavian countries. 

Mr. Stansbury was one of 
twenty people who made up 
this expedition. They cov- 
ered Sweden. Norway. Fin- 
(Tnm to Page 9) 





LUCAS . BOSCH - CASTROL - GIRLING - AMCO 

Foreig n Car Parts 

641 West Colfax Ave. Palatine, 111. 60067 
Phone- b91 -2240 Hour?- Daily 8:30-5 <0 , Sat. 9-1 

Parts & Accessories for all Foreign Cars 
ENGLISH JAPANESE 
GERMAN FRENCH ITALIAN 

EXHAUST- BRAKES- IGNITION- CLUTCH 
- ENGINE- SUSPENSION 



him, totally amazed at how 
a four square-foot piece of 
dirt could be a whole world. 
Wars were fought there; cars 
were raced; pies were made; 
hours were spent at play. 
He wasn't a moaner. Oh 
sure, he cried. But usually 
the tears were gone in min- 
utes. That>i»ile came back 
brighter each and every 
time, too; bigger and bright- 
er than ever before. 

The radiance of his pres- 
ence was at t^es alarming. 
You found yourself asking, 
"How can so much personal- 
ity come from such a small 
package?" 

He could charm his way 
around Just about every- 
one he met. Mix Just the right 
amounts of love.innocence, 
impishness, and trust. Spice 
these up with a cute smile, 
and there he was. 

Remarkably mature and 
advanced for his age, he 
always had a new surprise 
for you. It seemed that no 
matter how long or short 
a time had passed since last 
you had seen him. a major 
change had taken place. He 
had gzown up just that much 
more. 

No, he wasn't really a 
bad kid. He was only Ave. 
But now he's dead. He has 
become Just one more sta- 
tistic in a growing sickness 
that is sweeping tliis coun- 
try. The sickness is child 
abuse. 

The child abuser is a sick 
person. He cannot control 
his emotional reaction to a 
child's behavior. He is not 
able to function in a normal 
discipUnary manner. He 
needs help. 

My little boy, the child in 
my story, is fictional. But 
the sickening fact is that 
there are thousands of 
kids Just like him all over 
this country and all over the 
world. TTiere may even be a 
child like this in your area. 
Help stop this ugly story. 
Look for signs of abuse; 
bruises, swollen eyes, 
scratches, contusions. Help 
the abused child, but more 
important perhaps help the 
abusive parent. 



S««k«rs 

(Cent from Phgt 7> 
fall. The course will be of- 
fered again in the spring for 
three semester hours of cred- 
it at Wheaton College. An- 
other three hour credit 
course, "Old Testament 
Themes and Characters" 
may also be offered. Hope- 
fully, Harperwillgrantcred- 
it for these courses also. 
Any more information about 
the group or its activities 
can be obtained at the Book- 
table, or at the Seekers meet- 
ings, Thursday at noon, in 
D227. 



November 5, 1973 



H 



H/4RBINGER 



" ■ • P«ge 7 

HMRBINGER FOIIES 




nom long wilt .1 ufc, from 64 (^f An. 2 -econd.. 



wwmi 



bi^n m-J. .„ ^"T •"'* '" ''""•> -""^'-^ the f-r., 
IthT TK "70 r *^[^ '"""« ?•»«•"«••". on September 19 




14^EB<IN 

DISrORIlON 

THE ALL PURPOSE CASKET. The Rocky Moun- 
tain Casket Company of Colorado is now offering a 
great bargain to everyone who plans on dying some- 
day. For a mere $125. they'll ship you a wooden casket 
for your eternal resting place, along with some sug- 
gestions on how to use it in the meantime. The com- 
pany points out that the coffin will serve you faithfully 
as a gun cabinet, a rack for pool cues, a book cabinet, 
a coffee table, or anything else you can think of. P'or an 
extra ten bucks, they'll even include four shelves that 
fit neatly inside, transforming the casket into a wine 
'ack. EARTH NEWS 

GIMME DAT OL' TIME RACISM. The law and or- 
der theme has finally struck home in the Deep South. 
A recent report from Miami, P^lorida indicates the Ku 
Klux Klan has revised one of their long-time trade marks 
in order to comply with local fire ordinances. Instead 
of using gasoline-soaked crosses for front-lawn cere- 
monies, they've switched to an all-electric model. 

EARTH NEWS \^ 

DILDO-WIELDING JUDGE DISMISSED. A Los An- 
geles Judge was removed from ofTice this week by the Cal- 
ifornia Supreme Court for-among other things-Jabbing 
a public defender with a dildo in open court. The in- 
cident marked the first time that a California Judge has 
been removed from office. ' EARTH NEWS 





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By M URRAY & MOY in the piiizle below. See how 


many you can find. The sol- 
There are twenty five ution will appear in next 
words or phrases hidden week's HARBINGER. 



personals 



A 



RMN your pmcripiioiu is ready. 
OSCO. 

Julie, pleaae come home, we miM 
you. Bring David. .Mom and Dad. 
Wanted: Forty men to •tart a foot- 
ball team. Pleaae contact Spiro A. 
or Franlc S. 

Big Ralph tays Hi to aU Ihe peo- 
ple out there in Radioland. 
Love b where you find li, I'll 
be at S567H .\. Arllnifton Height* 
Road. 

Make love not war. do it here. 
Holldy (Hit*. 

II you Worry to much about life 
you win never live to lee the end 

of It. J DM. 

Any dam«el i* diatrcM call King 

Arthur'i Court. Round table divi- 
sion. Knight in Shining Amour. 

Rene, It can't be thai bad. DennU 

M. 

tf gambling ia a problem, we can 

help, .Stardust. 

Marci. last night I will never for- 
get. Joan. 

Fur Sale. I'aed tapes. CHEAP. 

uacd only once, write 1600 fVnn- 

aylvania Ave.. Washington. D.C 

for information. 

Pat, I told you he waa corrupt. 

please come home, Mummy and 

Daddic. 

M. I'll meet you at the hotel to 

compare note*. J. 

Sue. I got your message, see you 

at Ihe game. J..M 

Donna I love you, I must see you. 



Ntadid spacial proaacutor, mustlw 
kble to lake orders, send erfcreiKes 
to WhUt House. 

Mary. I'm sorry, next time I'll turn 
, off the Ughu, John. 
LRK The busincaa God Rulas. 

(;bz 

George, t can't take it any lonc- 
er, June. 

Needed. Directiona to Carnicgi 
Hall. Contact J. Denver 
Wixard. last night was wonderful 
l>erk. 

The cemetery shortage is now a 
grave situation. 

To whom it may concern: A roaa 
i» only a symbol. I.KK. 
Girls doni consider Token a pick- 
up, but rather a carry out. 
Adam, where were you and Kve 
last nigh*'' I rouldn't find you. 
(JOI). 

Eve, lets raise a little Cain to- 
night, /Xdam. 

Organir Ferlliizer for sale, contact 
N'oah. at the Ark. 

There is danger lurking in the 
wings, stick to the main bird. 
The dial tone, is really a bust 
from heaven. IBT. 
The newspaper shortage is real- 
ly brought on by over use of TP. 
One sheet only -please. BP. 
Beware of smiling people wear- 
ing tennis shoes. 
Pipce is a frame of mind. 
Henry. Please come home, w* 
need you desperately, C.olda M. 
and Aba F,. 



The results of the rivalry 
trophy poll held last week 
are as follows: 

For Idea 50 - Against 

Tropfty with Symbol 47 - 
Symbol 3. 

The results will be pre 
sented to the Senate for the 
appropriate action. 



f. 



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Page 8 



T€ 



H>f^NGER 



'I 



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November 5, 1973 November 5, 1973 



T€ 



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a66 



ifirdg I 



Cfiiem0 cwrse offered 



HELP WANTED - FuU or parlUme 
general lab work and cleanup - 
$3.00 per hour - must be over 
16. Call 3S»4t228. 

1963 VaUant, original owner. 
28,000 mile*, very good condition, 
over 20 mliea per gallon, 
93.00. Evenings or weekends 
3a2-««3«. 

ABORTION 

and planned parenthood iirfo. 

FOR 

CHICAGO METROPOLITAN 

AREA. CONVENIENT N.W. 

SIDE LOCATION. 

PRIVATE 

CONFIDENTIAL 

COUNSELING 

FJCCELLENT AND 

COMPLETE FACILITIES 

LICENSED PHY.«iiriA\.S 

PREGNANCY TESTING 

WITH IMMEDIATE RESULTS 

LOW COST 
312 772-1151 or 7721 152 

Part Time Evening work available 
UflM Janitorial in i-Uk Grove area. 
CaOmt-ttnO or 359-1505 

Wanted - Ciri to help with house- 
work for family of five with work- 
ing mother. Hours can be arrang- 
ed. Call 3S»J335 after 300 KM 



CombUwlloa . 

Sears $75.00: CocktaU f Mr. end 
■bic A tabic Teak $20.00. 
$15.00 * $5.00 respectively. 

991 -nsT. 

Info on piscine rlssst(i*4 ads- 
call 397-3000 •■! JTJ 



Sludtms, earn extra momy 
"filing ecology baaed 
Shaklee Products. 
Earn up to $7 an ht. 
Call 3S»04M. alter 4:00. 



Help Wanted 

■ to run sound for 

Harper's ColWhouses 

Tuesdays 1 1 30 a.m. 1:30 p.m. 

Contact: Hope §pniaiMc, 

Student Activities Room A-336 

1967 Honda "SOS" 
Hardly used, laspccd 
Belgian Racer. Flaming t«d 
Gary Kjit. 272 (after 12:00) 
or 272 4152 (.Sundays) 

Wanitd: 

Live-in or day care for two girls. 
- ages 3 and 5. 

In Hunting Ridge area 

right behind college. 

Room and board plus salary open. 

Call 359-1975 ■ Days 

359-5537 - Evenings. 
Ask for Pat Walker 

Work on rampus in 
Community Relations Office 
Typing it clerical duties 
16-18 hr./wk 
Contact Ruth Hiael 
Ext 266 Rm. A-323 

Dial a Secretary 
893-3.332 

Will type reports. lhe»i<., resume, etc 
Special student rates 



Most powerful electric fish 
is the electric eel (Elec- 
trophorus electricus). An 
srerage-sized specimen can 
discharge 400 voiU at 1 
ampere, but measurements 
up to 650 volU have been 
recorded. 



A new course in Contem- 
porary Cinema at Harper 
College in Palatine will con- 
centrate on the evolving 
image of women as por- 
trayed in film. 

TTie non-creditt ccoutirs; 
a study of coontemporarrr; 

ema as an entertainment 
and communications media. 
Contemporary Cinema 
(CEC014-001) will be pre- 
sented from 9-11 a.m. on 



J. moDA ms 

ClUtMoOi I Ml, 

V\#i«ro young men 
find brands Ihey 




Tuesdays and Thursdays 
November 6 through Decem- 
ber 4 in Room A-242 of the 
College Center.. 

Films to be viewed and 
discussed in class will include 
"Bus Stop." "Nights of 
Cabiria" and "Salt of the 
Earth." 

Registrations are being 
accepted in the Harper Con- 
tinuing Education Office, 
397 3000, extension 301. 

Tuition is S14 for dis- 
trict residents and $33.72 
for others. 

Child Care is available 
at 75 cents an hour, and 
arrangement for this ser- 
vice should be made at the 
time of registration. 



H>1RBINGER 



Page 9 



Problem off un-wod 
mothers discussed 



" Unwed Motherhood: Is it 
Still a Social SUgmaT' is 
the topic for discussion on 
the November 1 1 boardcasts 
of Focus: Northwest, Harf)er 
College talk show on 
WWMM-FM(92.7). 

P'ocus: Northwest can be 
heard each Sunday at 8 
a-m. and again at 9 p.m. 
Moderator for the Novem- 
ber 11 show is Elizabeth 
McKay, director gfenviron- 
mental health and assist- 
ant professor at Harper. 
Panel members incude Es- 
ther Kulp, outreach nurse 
from The Bridge in Pala- 



tine; Kathy Riley, social 
worker iiT the Unmarried 
Parent Division, Lutheran 
Child and Family Services, 
and Kathy Hogan, place- 
ment services supervisor, 
Bensenville Home Society. 
Along with discussion on 
counseling the unwed moth- 
er, subjects to be covered 
include counseling the un- 
married couple, married 
couple, and the divorced and 
separated mother. 

The program is produced 
by Harriet Kandelman of 
Harper's Community Rela- 
tions Office. 



Open Monday A Thumday 
Evening 



Drink«rt 

(Coot, from Page 9) 

one. they are stamped on the 
hand with 'No" One note 
of warning to anyone trying 
to wash out the marking 
Don't If your caught, you 
will be escorted out of the 
establishment - - no ques- 
tions asked and lold not to 
come back'!' 

As a group, the nineteen to 
twenty -one year olds seem 
to be exercising their new 
found right withanunexpect 
ed maturity. 



Sign language course offered 



The sign language course 
is an introduction to one of 
the most interesting forms of 
communication Students 

learn manual alphabet, the 
most frequently, used signs, 
and a short history of sign 
language It is being of 
fered to enable students to 
engage in conversations with 
hearing - impaired students 
on campus, and will be taught 
by Mrs Lee Potts . Register - 
ed Interpreter for the Deaf 
The class will be held 



every Wednesday for eight 
weeks from noon tol 30p m 
in room D107. starting Nov 
7. 1973 A textbook is re 
quired for the course 
(approx $5 00) The course 
is open to all Harper stu 
dents, faculty, and staff For 
more information and regis 
tratlon. please contact Stu- 
dent Activities Office A336 

Sponsored by Student 
Activities and The Hearii«- 
Impaired Program. 




• 8 iif it display 

• Skirl pocket sin 

• Astoinattc constMl 

• Crttfit balanct 

• Battery and AC operation • Repeat addition 
and subtraction • Full floating or program- 
mable decimal with round oft • Automatic 
squaring • Full or>e ypar guarantee 
AC adapter . ,NctuOEDI 



f'roa the calculator peoole 

SP Electronics 

PO Box 5 

IVosoect Heights, Illinois 60070 



all Over Chicagoland 

When was the last time 
you stood up and 

applauded a movie? 

When were you so impressed and involvwi 
that you spontaneously cheered? 

In theaters across the country, audiences 
are standing up applauding and 
cheering "Walking Tall." 
It is a deeply moving, contemporary film. 
"Walking Tall ' is based on the true story 
of a young man who wouldn't 
surrender to the system 

J and the girl who 
always stood by him. 



Address 




WALKING 
lAU 



City 

State 



Illinois Residents Add 5%. 



"WALKING TALL", .joe don baker 

fi^i'^llr.':^^^. TOSEMARY MURPHY 



WATCH FOR ANNOUNCEMENT 
iNYOiJBAREAl 



Sfoiisbvry 






(Coot from Page 9) 

land, Denmark, and Iceland, 
the latter two of which he and 
four others covered. 

These twenty people were 
chosen from higher educa- 
tional institutions through- 
out the United States and 
Canada for the express pur- 
pose of examining the pos- 
sibilities of allowing stu- 
dents in the Scandinavian 
countries to attend our col- 
leges and receiving credit 
for what they have learn- 
ed in their own institutions 

Frorri the twenty people. 
four groups were formed 
consisting of five people per 
group. Mr Stansbury's 

group covered Denmark and 
Iceland and were away from 
September 13 to October 12 
Mr Stansbury spent a week 
in Denmark visiting and 
talking with the Education- 
al Ministry and different in- 
stitutions of higher educat- 
ion He also spent a week 
in Norway 

Each group came back with 
representatives from the 
places they visited to con- 
firm the reports of the group 
to the board 

As a result of this exped- 
ition, a small booklet is in 
the process of being printed 
and distributed to institu- 
tions of higher education 

While in Germany. Mr 
Stansbury did research for 
Harper onthe Vocational In 
stitutions and on the Adult 
Educational systems in Swe- 
den. If Harper propose.s to 
provide students with foreign 
study op^.rtunities. short 
term programs were sug* 
gested lasting from one to 
six months Foreign coun- 
tries would attempt to 
provide instruction in 

English for this type of pro- 
gram This must still be 
approved by the school 

Mr Stansbury stated with 
air transportation the way 
it is, and the cooperation 
of the European counthies, 
this project would be a good 
thing to look into 



^•rir (/.M. cofiyenffoii 
fo bt h§ld 

Harper will again be re- 
presented dt the United Na- 
tions Organization. Nov 29 
UNO. is a mock security 
council meetat Pequen? Un 
iversity in I'itt-^bcrg, in 
which representatives from 
state widi" co'legps partici- 
pate as delegates from each 
country in the UN 

Representii'.g Harper will 
beMarily Watts, a Political 
Scierice student, Mark Gold- 
smith, Treasurer of the Stu- 
dent Senate, and Tom Trun- 
da. Student Senator. The 
three students will be acting 
as delegates from Panama 

Issues will focus on cur- 
rent events such as the Mid- 
dle East. Rhodesia. South 
Africa. International Ter- 
rorists, and admission of 
new states to the U.N. 



Effect of nineteen-yeor-old drinking law 



/ 



By RICHARD KUSNIEREK 

A month has come and 
gone for people between the 
age of nineteen and twenty - 
one The statement would 
not usually cause much of a 
stir except for the fact it 
has served as a miniature 
test span of maturity A 
different phase of life has 
been shown in this age group 
in thecapacity to legally pro- 
cure wine and beer since 
a law to this effect was pas- 
sed on October 1, 1973 

Some interesting thoughts 
cropped up between the com- 
bination of aqua vita (the wat- 
er of life for all of you that 
didn't pass high school Latin 
and never regretted it) and 
the average nineteen to twen- 



ty -one year old. The point 
of questions being - - accep- 
tance at establishments that 
serve alcoholic beverages 
and acceptance of respooKib- 
ility to drink coupled with the 
individuals knowledge of 
their own tolerance to beer 
and/or wine. 

Visiting one of the local 
watering spas. I directed 
these and other questions to 
Ms Lyn Clifford, wife of 
the owner .of Durty Nellies, 
in Palatine, and Mr John 
Jewell, a bartender there 
The general outlook they had 
was quite favorable Ms 
Clifford stated that since 
passage of the law. there has 
been a definite increase in 
business inthedaybarclien- 



tale 

Asked what process they 
use for distinqmshing var- 
ious age groups, theyreplied 
that anyone who looks under 



the age of 25 must submit to 
an identification check If 
the person is under twenty 

(IVura to Pm»8 > 



OILENQ4R 
OFEt^EMS 

ON CAMPUS - 

CongreMwoman Iklla Abzug, Nov. 8 at 8:00, College 

Center. Free with Harper I.D. 
HARPER WIND ENSEMBLE & JAZZ BAND CON- 
CONCERT, SCHEDULED NOV. 6. HAS BEEN 

CANCELLED. 
The Coffee House will feature a Karate Demonstration, 

Tuesday, Nov. 6, at 12:00 p.m. 
Student Senate Mtg., Nov. 8. 12:30, A241A & B. 
.Ski Club. Tuesday, 12:15, D231. 
Harper Players, Tuesday, 12:30, F304. 
Concert-Dance featuring "Colours," Nov. 9, 8:00 p.nj, 

I>ounge. 
Area high school art exhibit, sponsored by Harper 

College, Nov. 5-21, Learning Resource Center, BIdg. 

F, during college hours. Admission is free, public is 

welcome. • . 

"In A Medical Laboratory," a movie on the careers 

possible in a medical lab, on Channel 6, Nov. 6 & 

7 at 10 & 11 a.m., 12 noon, 1, 6, 7 & 8 p.m. 

Any television on campus. 

THEATRE - 

"Jacques Brel is Alive and Well and Living In Paris" — 
the first librettoless musical, starring Chita Rivera & 
Gilbert Price. Opens Thurs., Nov. 8, at the Ivanhoe 
Ph. 248-6800 or C. R 2-27 1 1 . 

"The Day After the Fair," with Deborah Kerr, at the 
Studebaker Theatre. Ph. 922-2973. 

"Wait Until Dark," with Michael Cole, at the Pheasant 
Run. Ph. 584-1454. 

"The Skin of Our Teeth," starring Sarah Miles. Arling- 
ton Park Theatre. Ph. 392-6800. 

"The Paisley Convertible," starring George Hamilton. 
Drury Lane ITieatre. Ph. PR 9-4000. 

CONTINUINC- 

"Grease," Blackstone Theatre. Ph. ST2 - 2280. 

"F'reedom of the City," at the Goodman Theatre. Ph. 
236-2337. 

"The Wonderful Ice Cream Suit," Leo A. Lerner Thea- 
tre. Ph. LO 1-8033. 

MUSIC- 

.Sergio .Mendes & BrasU '77 and Lainie Kazan, Nov. 

6-11, Mill Run Theatre. Ph. 298-2170. 
Bayanihan Philippine Dance Co., Nov. 11, Auditorium 

Theatre. Ph. 922-6634. 
\'irtuo8i Di Roma, Italian instrumentalists known for 

their baroque music, at the Auditorium Theatre, Nov. 

16, 8:00 p.m. 
Johnny Mathis at the Arie Crown Theatre, Nov. 21- 

24. Tickets at Box Office and Ticketron outlet. 
ART - 
An art display, presented by students of High School 

District 211, will run Monday, Nov. 5 through P>i- 

day, Nov. 9, at Woodfield's Grand Court and Malls. 



ISobbv ^ 
ITIc Cee's 

Deep-Pan Pizza 
Pitchers of Beer A Wine 

704 N. River Road 
Mt. Prospect. III. 

Phone: 297-9520 
>eeeee»seesssssseeeeeessaa> » «eseese » eeeseeea* 




r- 

I 

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FREE Judo Lesson 



for guys and gals 
Meet friends - Have funi 

BLACK BELT 
Traininv Program 

Vt€ SPECIALIZE IN BEGINNERS 







I 
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1.. 



Aiudo & Self Defense School 



255-5503 



Member US J A 



358-6868 



664 E. Northwetl Hwy..Pola(in«. III. 

I ufAlcd on IU> 14 1 J mlk- Ur*l uf M<rv .>.) 
lotnt In or call for yuur KKKK LK^UMtN 




Make Money Nexl Semester; 

SALESMEN NEEDED 



TO SELL ADS 
FOR THE HARBINGER 

Room A367 Ext. 272 

Gary Zdeb-Business Manager | 



Apply NOW I 



I 




MMMMfeS 



/ 



page 10 



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H/IRBINGER 



^ 



November 6, 1973 



HAWKS SWAMP RAIDERS 
IN MUD BOWL 16-12 



By CHUCK ZEMESKE 

The HAWKS, determined 
to shine despite the overcast, 
rainy Homecoming day, de- 
feated the Oakland Raiders 
(from Farmington, Mich.) 
16-12. This win was not on- 
ly a great accomplishment 
from a homecoming view- 
point, but also from the as- 
pect that this was the flrst 
time in Harper's three year 
football history that the 
HAWKS surpassed their 
previous high of three wins 
in a season. 

The first set of plays af- 
ter the kickoff seemed to set 
the stage to see who could 
hang onto the ball longest 
before fumbling it. There was 
a total of 20 fumbles in the 
game, and 8 resulted in turn- 
overs. The HAWKS, after 
bringing the ball out to their 
own 46, fumbled and Oak- 
land took over. Unable to 
move the ball for the neces- 
sary first down yardage, the 
Raiders coughed up the 
ball to Harper, but the 
HAWKS stiU handcuffed by 
the deluge dilemma, were 
forced to punt from their 
40 yardline. 

The Raiders then trudged 
65 yards downfleld with 
their quarterback, Mike 
Surma, gaining 27 yards 
on a broken play which 
left them on the HAWK 
18. Surma, again on the 
run, swept around the end 
from 8 yards out to make 
the score 6-0 and remained 
as such when the kick at- 
tempt was blocked with 7:26 
left in the flrst quarter. 

The HAWKS made their 
comeback in the second 
quarter, scoring all of their 
touchdowns with the gen- 
erous help of the Raiders, 
setting up the advantageous 
opportunities for both Har- 
per scores. P'oUowing a 36 
yard Pat Dempsey punt the 
Oakland receiver, plagued 
by the inability to hang 
onto the ball, dropped the 
ball and Steve P>ankovic 
was there for HAWK re- 
covery on the Raider 27. 
Hampered by the weath- 
er Harper chose to run the 
ball rather than to leave 
themselves open to the risk 
of passing. Mike Kinney 
took the ball in for the first 
HAWK touchdown from 
one yard out. Kevin Wil- 
son added the extra point 
at 3:09 in the second quar- 
ter and Harper possessed 
the edge, a lead that was 
to hold for good. 

The HAWKS didn't waste 
much time in collecting their 



next 7 points, striking again 
in less than two minutes af- 
ter their initial score. After 
the HAWK kickoff from 
the first touchdown, Steve 
O'Neill recovered anoth- 
er Raider fumble, this one 
on the first Oakland play 
from scrimmage. Mike Kin- 
ney came through for his 
second touchdown of the 
game, this time carrying the 
ball in from 14 yards out 
Wilson kicked his second 
conversion point and the 
HAWKS went to the locker 
room at halftime with a 
14-6 lead. 

Harper put the game away 
in the third quarter when the 



HAWK defense responded 
to push Oakland to their 
goal line. With their backs 
against the wall, the Raiders 
were forced to punt and 
this time the defense success- 
fully blocked the kick. The 
ball trickled into the end- 
zone, but before the HAWKS 
could claim possession, it 
had rolled out. The safety 
added two more proints 
to the total making the score 
16-6. 

Finnerty ran 46 yards 
le Raiders, but was to no 

with the HAWKS be- 
. to hold on for their 
against 3 de- 
feats. 



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Referendum balloting procedures announced 



^ 



By L. R. KEIL 

The method to be used In 
the selection of a student rep- 
resentative on the college 
board, will be the purpose of 
a Referendum on November 
13 and 14. 

The need for this referen- 
dum was created when Gov- 
ernor Walker signed into law 
House BiU 1628, and thusly 
created FubUc Act 78-822. 
The main points of this act 
are as follows: 
1. "Each community Col- 
lege Board, shall have 
one non-voting member, 
who is a student enroll- 
ed in the Junior College 
under the jurisdiction of 



the board," and 

2. "The method of select- 
ing student members 
shall be determined by 
a campus-wide student 
referendum." 

3. "The student member 
shall serve a term of one 
year beginning July 1 
of each year, except that 
the student initially se- 
lected shall serve a term 
begirming on the date of 
such election and expir- 
ing on the next succeed- 
ing June ^0." 

The Administration of 
Harper College, in compli- 
ance with this new law, has 
set up this referendum, to of- 
fer Ihe choice of selection to 



the student body. There are 
four questions to be answer- 
ed in this referendum. They 
are on the sample ballot as 
follows: * 

A new Illinois law provides 
for non-voting student rep- 
resentation on all boards 
governing higher education. 
The Harper College Board 
of Trustees wUl have one 
non-voting member who is 
a student enrolled in the 
college. 

This campus referendum is 
being conducted to determine 
how the student representa- 
tive will be selected. 
Please select one alternative 
to each question. 



1. Should the student repre- 
sentative be: 

Appointed by the student 
^ governing body, the Stu- 
dent Senate? 
Elected by popular vote of 
the student body? 

2. Should the student repre- 
sentative be a full-time stu- 
dent (12 hours or more) 
only? 

YES 

NO 

3. Should the student repre- 
sentative be a resident of 
the Harper College Di»^ 
trict? YES 

NO 

4. If vacated, should the un- 
expired term of the student 
representative be niled by: 



Appointment by the 

Student Senate 

Election by student 

body 

Through communications 
with other community col- 
leges in the area it has been 
found that there are other 
determinations in regards to 
the selection of this represen- 
tative. 

1. There are no restric- 
tions as to whether or 
not the student rep must 
be a full time student. 

2. Persons taking contin- 
uing education courses 
are eligible. 

3. The election process 

(Turn to page 7) 



TC 



H/4RBINGER 

William Rainey Harper College. Algonquin and Roselle Roads. Palatine, Illinois 60067. 312-397-3000 - 



Vol. 7. No. 9 



November 12. 1973 



Dr. Korbel recalls micro-wave research 



By DENNIS MURRAY 

Dr. Susan Korbel. Associ- 
ate Professor of Psychology 
here at Harper, has done re- 
search on Ultra High Fre- 
quency (UHF) waves and 
their effect on a species of 
white rate, sprayquedawley. 

Dr. Korbel graduated in 
1963 from Baylor Univer- 
sity in Texas with a Ph.D. In 
Psychology. She has taught 
at Baylor University ('61- 
'64 ), Arkansas University 
(•64-'72), and In 1972 and 
came to Harper College be- 
cause she believed it was an 
expanding school and had 
fine faciUties. 

Dr. Korbel, who is now 
married, uses her maiden 
name as to prevent confusion 
in her scientific endeavors. 

The doctor started her re- 
search by mere chance. She 
was waiting to discuss a pos- 
sibility for a thesis and am- 
used herself by reading a 
■cientific Journal. Dr. Korbel 
had found that no one had 
done any reserach on the 
lower levels of U H F waves. 
The national standard for 
micro- wave and UHF is 
10 mw/cm 2. She stated that 
research was not done on the 
lower frequencies because 
they wore "theoretical blind- 
ers" meaning they went un- 



der Ihe assumption that the 
only way UHF affects you 
is through increasing body 
heat as a result of Ihe high- 
er frequencies and larger 
doses. 

She started her research in 
1961 at Baylor University 
under a grant from the Na- 
tional Science Foundation. 

Her experiments consisted 
of a control, and an experi- 
mental group of rats using 
them from the shortest period 
of 28 days to the longest 
period of six months at fre- 
quencies from .15 to 3.5 mh. 

At all frequencies, in the 
early stages, the rats became 
hyper-active, after a time, 
they l>ecame more compla- 
cent, and returned to a natur- 
al state of activity. 

After two and one half 
weeks, the rats once again 
became hyperactive, and be- 
c.tme more irritable when un- 
der the influence of micro- 
wave, and great stress. 

As the stress became great- 
er, the adrenal glands in- 
creased in weight, and Dr. 
Korbel found that the exper- 
imental rats had increased 
their adrenal gland weight. 

The experimental rats 
were more prone to seizure, 
than were the control rats, 
seizures were induced 
through electric shock, and 



or aduio-gennic means. The 
control group when subject- 
ed to shock, came out of the 
seizures fastereach time they 
were subjected. The experi- 
mental rats took longer to 
come out of the seizures each 
time it was induced. 

Another experiment Dr. 
Korbel did was to place the 
rats in a "water maze. "This 
is a four or five foot deep 
maze filled with water and 
the reward for doing the 
maze is to be free from the^ 
maze and able to stop swim- 
ming. She found that the ex- 
perimental rats learned 
much slower than the con- 
trol rats. The doctor also test- 
ed for emotional stress 
through a device called the 
"Open Field Box." This was 
a simple box with squares 
drawn on the bottom divid- 
ing the floor into sections. 
A light source was placed 
in the center square. The less 
the emotional stress the more 
inquisitive they were and the 
more they ventured toward 
the light. She found that the 
control rats did Just that and 
that the experimentals just 
ran around the ouside walls. 
These experiments were all 
done at low levels of radia- 
tion. 

Dr. Korbel plans to con- 
tinue her research on oth- 
er effects such as the effect 



of radiation on the different 
stages of pregnanc> and 
on a newborn. 

Dr. Susan Korbel is in a 
group called the American 
National Standard Institu- 
tion funded by the^'avy and 



whose Job it is to decide 
to lower the National Stand- 
ard. 

She now teaches all Psy- 
chology courses and is try- 
ing to pass a new course call- 
ed Introduction to Research. 



^ 




d 



Microwave expert Dr. Susan Korbel. 



Davf G§rd9ii •« fcvmai rights 

page 5 

Mtff Haykwrsf, Sfidttf StMff h$sitltiit 

page 2 



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H/RBINGER 



November 12, 1973 



Student Senate President requests on-compus lawyer 



SHOULD WE HAVE A 
LAWYER ON CAMPUS? 

Yes. Manyjunior, and four 
year coUegPS have obtained 
the services of very able and 
capable lawyers. Students at 
Harper would greatly benefit 
from a lawyer that takes 
an interest in prote<;tinK, 
and securing* their inalien- 
able rights. "College is no 
place to withhold on the 
progress of liberty." (Cam- 
pus Justice, a book by the 
National Student Associa- 
tion. ) The Student Senate at 
Harper College addresses it- 



self to this philosophy. 

We, as your elected repre- 
sentatives must befriend 
your interest at hand. We, 
with the cooperation of Mrs. 
McKay, have estabUshed in 
the student Health Services 
Department, the very comp- 
etent services of a physi- 
cian, to treat students on 
campus. The Senate is pay- 
ing for his service. Students 
responding to a question- 
naire given to them by the 
Health Services Department, 
highly encouraged other stu- 
dents to partake intheavail- 




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^ability of this service. 

Earlier, in March of this 
year. Dr. Slayton, the Co- 
ordinator of the Legal Tech- 
nology I'rogram at Harper, 
appeared before last year's 
Senate. He spoke to them on 
the idea of setting up a leg- 
al clinic, and referral service 
for students, and their fam- 
ilies. 

Dr. Slayton reported that 
he had talked to several law- 
yers, and bar associations 
that would be willing to co- 
operate. The program would 
consist of a clinic for stu- 
dents and their families to 
come and talk over a legal 
problem. This clinic would 
be concerned with just the 
, general aspects of the law, 
for funding it could come 
out of the students pocket 
as he or she used the ser- 
vice. Or, the Senate could 
use money from the Special 
Projects P'und. 

A large number of colleges, 
such as DeVry, and the Un- 
iversity of Illinois have free 
legal services provided for 
the students. I am concerned 
that students receive the en- 
thusiasm of the student Sen- 
ate justice, and academic due 
process, which belong to, 
and affect our student con- 
stituency. Sargent Shriver's 



defense of college's youth's 
maturity and judgment of 
values is important, the av- 
erage age of a college student 
is 22. Her atHarper it is27. 
A lawyer on campus can 
advise students of their 
rights, and help them with 




■ *//.X 



Senate President Robert 
Hayhurst 

problems they might have. 
Also, Harper has formed 
a Student Conduct Commit- 
tee, consisting of four facul- 
ty members, and three stu- 
dents. It is their job to lis- 
ten and determine judgment 
on each case before them. 
We have six methods of 
disciplinary action which are 
defined in the Student Hand- 
book. Students are given 



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the right of due process and 
equal protection of the laws. 
Lawyers, can on campus, 
provide services and if need 
be, prosecute any college 
official, once a justified case 
has been determined against 
them. 

Other organizations, like 
the American Civil Liberties 
Union, and the Office of 
Economic Opportunity, can 
obtain and provide lawyers 
for students. A student is a 
private citizen, and the col- 
lege should treat him as one, 
in their non-academic life, 
private or public, students 
should be free from college 
control. On the other hand, 
the college should not be 
held responsible for the non 
academic activities of its 
individual students. 

The student, like a teach- 
er, is a member, not only 
of an academic community, 
but the community at large. 
If legal services are obtain- 
ed, they should not be just 
for the student, but also for 
the faculty as well. 

Unless Harper College 
authorities act in behalf of 
studenU, there is the real 
danger of alienation, of tiie 
weakening of the confidence 
of the college as a commun- 
ity, and the ultimate resort 
by students to go to out- 
side agencies. 

It is the job of the Student 
Senate at Harper to look 
into this, and provide ser- 
vices to students. 



Bella Abzug 
visits Harper 

By DAVE GORDON 

On Thursday evening, No- 
vAnber 8, Democratic Con- 
gresswoman Bella Abzug 
appeared at Harper to share 
her own observations of 
what is going on politically 
in this country. 

As has been reported in 
the national press, Ms. Ab- 
zug is a staunch political 
opponent of Richard Nix- 
on, and judging from her 
address she doesn't care for 
him personally either. 

Before the National elec- 
tions of 1972, she called 
for his impeachment, and 
in a bill presenUy beTore 
Congress she has charged 
him with seven separate 
violations of the Constitu- 
tion. 

Among these alleged viola- 
tions are the firing of Arch- 
ibald Cox, which Abzug 
claims is Nbton's biggest 
mistake; the impounding of 



>Jovember 12, 1973 



*(Turn to page 8) 



GILEND4R 

tin Campus — 

Kaffee Klatch for the "Over-the-Hill Gang" (any mature 
femile who is retiarning to school). A chance to get 
togetiier, share experiences and difficulties of return- 
ing to school. Nov. 12. 13. 19 & 20 at 9:00 a.m. 
and 1:00 p.m.. 2nd cubicle. Bldg. A. 
"Slaughterhouse Five". 8:00 p.m. E 106. 
Art exhibit of Guajiro Tapestries from the MaU Mai 
Workshop, Venezuela, Nov. 17-Dec. 16. In Learn- 
ing Resources Center, free, during college hours. 
Public welcome. 
"How Safe are ,^erican ReactorsT', a documentary 
on the dangers of nuclear power by many environ- 
mentalists and scientists in tiie field. Nov. 13 
8:00 p.m. A 242, free. Public U invited. 
Coffee House, featuring Sean Ryan, Tues., Nov. 13. 

12:00, Bldg. A. 3rd cubicle. 
"Ski Boom", a visit to some of the largest ski areas 
in Uie Rocky Mountains, on channel 6, any televi- 
sion on campus, Nov. 13 & 14 at 10 A 11 a.m. 
12 noon, 1,6, 7, & 8 p.m. 
Harper Players, Tues.. 12:30, F 304. 
Ski Club, Tues. 12:15. D 231. featuring a ski movie. 

alto, money for ski trips will be collected. 
Area High School Art Exhibit, sponsored by Harper 
CoUege, tiiru Nov. 21. Uarning Resource Center. 
Bldg. F. during coUege hours. Admission is free, 
public it welcome. 

Theatre — 

"Jacques Brel it Alive and Well and Living in ParU "- 
the first librettoless musical, starring Chita Rivera 
& GUbert Price. At the Ivanhoe. Ph. 248-6800 or 
GR 2-2711. 
"The Skin of our Teeth", starring Sarah Miles. Ar- 
lington Park Theau-e. Ph. 392-6800. 
"The Day After the Fair." witii Deborah Kerr, at the 

Studebaker. Ph. 922-2973. 
"Wait Until Dark", with Michael Cole, at the Pheasant 

Run. Ph. 584-1454. 
•The Paisley Convertible", starring George Hamilton. 

Drury Lane Theati-e. Ph. PR 9-4000. 
"BuUey", starring Brian Bedford, opens Nov. 19. 

Studebaker Theatre. Ph. 922-2973. 
"A DoUs House" previews Nov. 16. 17 & 19, Good- 
man Theatre. Ph. 236-2337. 
"The Mind Witii The Dirty Man", starring Don Knotts 
as a member of a community leading a small town 
war on pornography. Nov. 20, Arlinglon Park 
Theatre, 392-6800. 



Continuing — 

"Grease", Blackstone Theatre. Ph. ST 2-2280. 
"The Wonderful Ice Cream Suit", Leo A. Lerner Thea- 
tre. Ph. LO 1-8033. 

Mu<«ic — 

Black Sabbath, at the Amphitheatre, Nov. 12. 

Paul Anka. at the Mill Run. Nov. 13-17. Ph 298- 

2170. 
The Association, with special guest B. W. .Stevenson. 

at the Arie Crown, Nov. 16 at 8:30. Tickets at the 

box office or Ticketron outlets. 
Dizzy Gillespie, Jazz trumpeter, at the College of I)u- 

Page, Nov. 17, Bldg. M. Convocation Center. Ph. 

858-2800, Ext. 241. 
Cheech & Chong, Auditoriun^ Theatre, Nov. 21, 8:00 

p.m., Ph. 922-2110. 
Virtuosi Di Roma, Italiarf instrumentalists known for 

their baroque music, at the Auditorium Theatre, Nov. 

16. 8:00 p.m. 
Johnny Afathis, at the Arie Crown Theatre, Nov.. 21- 

24. Tickets at the box office and Ticketron outiets. 
Huble Pie, at the Amphitheatre, Dec. 9. * 

Car Show— 

Oldsmobile "CoUecticfn of Fine Cars", thru Nov. 16lh 
at Woodfield Mall. 



f€ 



H/1RBINGER 



Page 3 



Peer Counselors tell plans 



BY HEIDI JOHNSON 

Have you felt the need to 
talk to someone lately, just 
anyone, bit you didn t know 
who? Or perhaps you needed 
help but didn t really feel 
like going to see a counse- 
lor? Peer counselors are 
here for this veryprupose 
Harper has seven peer 
counselors, that is. students 
who serve an outreach func- 
tion at Harper They reach 
out, to be a friend, to pro- 
vide information, tobealia- 
son between students and 
counselors -in short. to 
assist students in every way 
possible T^ey are not 

volunteers They are trained 
and paid for uieir job Al- 
though the budget only pro- 
vides for seven now, there 
will hopefully be more later 
on in the year 

Anne Rodgers and Joyce 
Nolen are the coordinators 




Would you buy a 
iserf environment 
from this man? 



Hayhurst 
recalls trip 

Student Senate President. 
Robert Hayhurst. recently 
attended the United States 
National Student Association 
convention, fn Indianapolis. 
Indiana 

The purpose of the trip, 
was to further the cause of 
tHfe college student, through 
discussion of problems faced 
by various colleges and the 
solutions that they have been 
able to work out. 

Some of the topics dis- 
cussed were problems with 
the faculty, various bills in 
the Congress that would 
prove to be beneficial to 
the college student in the 
form of financial aid, facul- 
ty evaluation, and others 
Mr Hayhurst stated that 
he found the conference to 
be beneficial to him and 
that it will probably help 
him function in his posi- 
tion as Student Senate Pres- 
ident 



for the peer counselors and 
meet with them weekly. 
These seven students have 
learned about the various 
services provided at Harper 
(such as Health services), 
the academic programs 
offered at Harper, how to 
register and drop courses 
and how to relate to others, 
among other things They 
each also work closely with 
one counselor toobtainmore 
experience These students 
try to a id others directly, but 
are aware of many other re- 
sour cer. to which they may 
refer students if they are 
unable to help them By 
getting to know the counse- 
lors, they may also refer 
students tothem if necessary 
and even help them se< up 
an appointment 

As one way ot reaching 
out, Joyce Stevens is having 
a Kaffee Klalch for the 



■Over-the-Hill Gang' It 
is mainly for older women 
returning to school who may 
feel (as she put it) 'that 
they are the only ones whose 
kids are going to school with 
dirty socks and have wads 
of dust under their beds ". 
They will have a chance to 
share their experiences and 
problems they are having in 
returning to school The 
dates for this are Nov 12. 
13, 19, and 20 at 9 00 am. 
and again at 1 00 pm.. 2nd 
cubicle, Bldg A 

Next time you need to 
talk, or havea problem large 
of small, try a peer counse- 
lor Recently, they have set 
up a table in the lounge of 
Bldg A as part ol their 

reaching out It is uncer- 
tain as to how many hours 
a week they II be there. b»H 
if you need them they'll be 
there. 



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Page 4 



TC 



H/I?BINGER 



November 12, 1973 



November 12, 1973 



T€ 



H/1RBINGER 



OUTPU- 



> 



Reform required 

With the passage of House Bill 1628, a rather unique 

situation has arisen here at Harper. While the situation 

has always been around, it has been highlighted with the 

referendum for the seating of a Student Representative 

' on the Board of Trustees. 

With the bill, the fact of the need for election reform 
has been brought to light During the course of the com- 
ing elections, the students will see Student Senators, car- 
rying ballote to the various lecture hails throughout the 
campus. 

This in itself would appear to bring questions of con- 
flict of interest to mind. However, due to the past poor 
turnout at the polls the magnitude of the issue, and the 
present set-up of election policies on this campus, this is 
the way it has to be. 

We at the HARBINGER feel that there should be eiH . 
tablished a new policy of election practices in this school. 
In the past, the Student Senate has run all elections 
where the student body was the voting public. This in- 
cludes any and all elections involving the Student Sen- 
ate itself. This is a poor practice, and one which should 
be brought to an end. 

What we proposed, and feel to be a Just and fair sys- 
tem, is one of an independent election committee. This 
committee would be composed of students who are not 
at the time of the election holding an elected office, and 
who are not candidates for an office in the election. 

This program would possibly mean an amendment to 
the Constitution of this college, and would probably 
take a considerable amount of time to implement, but 
we feeJ that the time and the effort would be well invest- 
ed. 

While we. at this dme, point no fingers at members of 
the Senate, and make no claims as to past political cor- 
rupUon on this campus, we .'eel that this step would re- 
lieve any possible future tension in regards to vote 
fraud, and misuse of the students right to vole. 

This commission would involve time and effort on the 
part of the people who would in the end, be holding posi- 
tions on this commission, but it would also help to in- 
sure the college community of fair elections and just 
results. 

The rights of the voting student are only as just (or 
corrupt ) as they are willing to make them. 



% «H>RBINGER 




Kditor-in-chief 
\tanaging Kditor 
Business Manager 
N'fws Kditor 

Activities Kditor 
Sports Kditor 
Cartoon Kditor 
I'hoto Kditor 
Photographers: 



Diane DiBartolomeo 
I.. K. Kiel 
CJary Zdeh 

.lim Muy 

Heidi .Inhnson 
Mike Wellman 
Denn'.H Murr.iv 
^ buck /,<.mi>sk» 
I' ml Curd. I\ii< iMssam. 
Wellma>i,<;rcg Conway 



.Miki 



Advitior - Mr. .Sturdevant 



ihf MAKBJ.\(;KH is the student publication for thf 
Harper College campus community, published wctkly 
except during holidays and mid-terms. All opinions ix 
pressed on the editorial page or in the columns arc 
those of the writer, and arc not necessarily those of tlu- 
college, its administration, fatuity or student body. 

For information on advcrti.sin^, ratts and publica- 
tion schedule, call or write Harbinger business Of 
fice. 

William Kainey Harper ( oilegt. /Mgonquiri and 
Uostllc Kds.. Palatine. Illinois 60067. I'hone num- 
ber •.mi-.UHm, txt. 272 and 460. 




vm^i 




Crawl Out 

I 

From Under A • 

ROCK. \/r)Ttf 




INPUT 



strawberry Stridor 

By GEORGE POLALES III 

Egalitarian societies need 
not profess their altruistic 
principles, they are evident In 
the basic actions of Its people 
and government. Where free 
speech is heard, ideas are 
openly expressed, and rea- 
son ahd logic are the only 
weapons of opponents, one 
can hardly argue against its 
equalitarian stature. Yet one 
must look farther than mere 
claims that a government 
has faithfully protected the 
rights of its citizens guar- 
anteed in its revolutionary 
charter; or that the people 
have not abrogated these lib- 
erties themselves. 

CivUfcEations are rarely 
capable of governing them- 
selves. The right that they 
should be able tn is cli-arly 
established by the " Laws of 
Nature." The point that 
many of a societies citizens 
may be intellectually defi- 
cient in the process requir- 
ed of them is acquiesced. The 
right, nevertheless, is their 
own as much as the right 
of introspective thought. 

Nations who persist in 
the persecution of a race, 
label dissenters as traitors, 
and engage in imperialistic 
adventures abroad, while 
unleashing a secret police 
at home are nations of ty- 
rants. Tliey may wear a 
mask that portrays them 
as peacemakers and free 
thinkers, but underneath is 
bared the tragedy of the slave 
state. TTie body not only is 
shackled by the golden 
chains of its economy, but 
the mind is also made a pris- 
on of archaic thought with 
no hope of expressing coun- 
terpoints of view. 



People often times lose per- 
spective of their importance 
in the decision making pro- 
cesses. They tend to relegate 
their powers to representa- 
tives that are not sensitive 
to human rights. The people 
not only have the ability 
but the inherent resporuib- 
ility to secure human rights 
for the future generation. The 
argument that ""l am just too 
busy trying to survive" is 
specious reasoning. People, 
in general, tend to adapt 
comfortably to the society 
in which they are born. As 
long as they are given their 
circus and grain few protests 
will be heard. Without a so- 
ciety where divergent phil- 
osophies are welcome, 
thought will stagnate. People 
wiU tend to accept any point 
of view the government may 
wish to espouse. Life will be- 
come a meaningless joke. 
The purpose of life will no 
longer be the search for 
Truth; life will become a per- 
petuation of lies in the sup- 
pression of individual 
thought. 

The Soviet Union Is a 
prime example. The Ideals 
that they professed In Oc- 
tober 1917 seem to have de- 
generated Into shells of thelr 
former being. Writers and 
scientists, as well as ordin- 
ary citizens, plead for peace 
and social justice. The an- 
swer they receive is a pris- 
on term In SI erla. Here they 
meet with more of the same 



cold reality known In the 
city Moscow. Citizens wish- 
ing emigration are brutal- 
ized physically and mental- 
ly. Homes are taken away. 
Taxes are forced to be paid 
before departure, often 
amounting to twenty-thous- 
and to one-hundred thous- 
and dollars. The reason 
Russia fears emigration 
is self evident. The Soviets 
have Imperialistic Interests 
within the Arab world. Their 
only Interest Is oil and the 
subjugation of a race, not 
the welfare of the Palestin- 
ians. The Soviet Union takes 
the position most conveni- 
ent to its' expansion, never 
regarding the moral and 
aesthetic questions Involv- 
ed. It then sits back and 
pontificates on the actions 
of other nations, whose mo- 
tives usually are more ex- 
emplary. 

A human being must be 
able to dream, to hope, to see 
a light at the end of his life 
brighter than the one he 
walks with now. A legacy 
for future generations, so 
that they may look forward 
to the pattern of truth. Wit- 
ness the hour of the life. 
Reach it and live It with 
the purpose of setting It 
free. 

No-one has the key to your 
soul. They may not lock It 
away. Yet, still, they may 
not set It free. Each, within 
the dream of the Bull and I. 



We welcome and encourage letters to the editor. They 
are subject to editing and concTensatlon to meet space 
and style requirements, and each must bear the writer's 
signature and address. Names may be withheld from 
publication at the writer's request, but signed letters will 
take precedence. 



V 



^m 




Starting very early in the 
I960's, a new movement 
hrcke onto the American 
scene 

Throughout the entire 
country, but especially in 
the 'Deep South', Black 
Americans, along with their 
white supporters, brought 
the fight for Civil Rights, 
or Civil Liberties if you 
prefer, out into the open 
for the first time. 

Men named MedgarlZvcrs, 
Martin Luther King, and 
Malcolm X became known 
all over the country 

.James H Meredith Jr. 
became a living martyr when 
he was admitted to the Un- 
iversity of Mississippi in 
1962 

T^ 196.1 bombing deaths 
of four young Black Ala- 
bama girls in a Birming- 
ham church, and the 1964 
discovery of three murdered 
civil rights workers in Mis- 
sissippi, brought the atten- 
tion of the entire world to 
focus on the racial struggle 
going on in this country 
Even. now. in J973, the 
Blacks struggle for freedom 
and equality continues Mar 
tin Luther King. Malcom X. 
and Medgar Evers have been 
^murdered, but their dreams 
and courage live on Many 
things have been accom 
plished to bring the Black 
American closer tothe posi- 
tion he deserves 

Granted, there are still 
many roads to be opened 
to a people whose heritage 
and culture have playedsuch 
an enormous role in Amer 
leas development. But what 
of those Americans, the only 
true Americans, without 
whose help none of us would 
be here'' 

Never in the history of 
civilized C) man has one 
race of people been subject- 
ed to such a clear-cut case 
of cultural, ethnic, and social 
genocide. 

The American Indian has 



Page 5 



been subjected to every con- 
ceivable abuse, up to and 
including the distorition and 
attempted destruction of his 
very heritage. 

A more proud and noble 
race of people has never 
existed, and yet for gener- 
ations white and non- white 
Americans alike have heap- 
ed degradation upon degra- 
dation onto the Indian and 
those things in which he be- 
lieves and those things for 
which he stands 

Historians have created 
a vile and ugly lie in their 
writings about the Indian 
He is portrayed by most as 
a foul. wild, uncontrolable 
savage: an animal The real 
a generally friendly, trust- 
ing person. He learned his 



death of an ego -centric, 
pompous. a.ss by the name of 
Geoege Armstrong Custer 
and his Seventh Cavalry were 
■'massacred" ty the com- 
bined efforts of the Sioux. 
Cheyenne, and Arapahoe na- 
tions 

What historians fail to 
mention is that in 1868. most 
of the Sioux. Northern Chey- 
enne, and Arapaho bands 
signed a treaty by which the 
segment of Dakota Territory 
which now comprieses all of 
South Dakota west of the 
Missouri River was given 
to them for a reservation 
Custer was killed forcross- 
ing into Indian ^and Feel 
ings were also running high 
against ' Yellow -hair ' be 
cause of an un- proved at- 



Educational Board formed 




treachery and savagery from 
the whites and non -whites 
who cheated him. raped his 
women, and eventually stole 
the only wealth he had; his 
land 

The removing of a victims 
scalp for example, is some- 
thing we readily attribute to. 
and associate with the In 
dian In truth, this quaint 
little custom was learned 
by the Indian from the Span 
ish invaders 

Another little over-sight 
of historians concerns the 



tack he and his "men" had 
made on an Indian erx^amp 
ment inhabited by old men. 
women and children There 
were no survivors. 

Throughout the history of 
this country and the dealings 
of its alien rulers with the 
native peoples, one thing has 
been quite clear Promises 
don't mean a damn thing 
Land was given, only to be 
taken back at th whim of 
the government that cave it 

(Turn to pag • 7) 



rn >200.00 plus I 
few hours work I 



I 
♦ 

I 



Representative needed! Earn 
each semester with only a U 
of the beginning of the semester. 
INTERNATIONAL MARKETING SERVICE, 
519 Glenrock Ave., Suite 203, 
Los Angeles, Califor<iia 90024 



If you big guys 
ore up in the air 
about not knowing 
what's ape-propriote 
for your mote, like 
Sampson here, then 
swing on over to: 

NORTHPOINT JEWELERS 

308 East Hand 

Arlington Heights. 

398-8211 




The Educational Board 
of Harper College has sdhed- 
uled a series of meetings 
on a range of topics which 
concern both students and 
the public. 

The meeting schedule is 
as follows: / ^ 

Dale Topic 

Jan 24, 1974 Business 
Affair Office 
Feb. 28, 1974 . Student 
Affairs 



March 28. 1974 Data 

Processing 

These meetings are held 
in the Board Room, A 
of the College Center be- 
ginning at 8 pm For ad- 
ditional information con- 
tact the Office of Com- 
munity Relations. 397- 
3000. extension 261 or 
262 The.ptiblic is invit- 
ed to attend 




THE ULTIIVIATE EXPERIENCE 
FOR EVERYONE! 

OISNEYS GREA T PIONEERING VENTURE IS 
THE SEASONS HIT REVIVAL ' " Ne,^,,^ 

"AN INCREDIBLY REVOLUTIONARY FILM .. . 
THE MINO CAN RUN RIOT!" xh. nyu T.ck., 
I -FAR AHEAD OF ITS TIME . .BEST AUDIOVISUAL 

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I "A TOTAL EXPERIENCE IN SIGHT, SOUND 

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ARLINGTON 

iMEAIfcE ARIINGION MEli'.Htb 
AOMISSIO.N VHUKS HiH AM. I'KKH)K.M.\\« Ks 
AMI IIS.ViiMl < }f||.|»»K\ M (Ml 

pk<m;ra.\i inkokmamon piiovk •i.-,.viii.-, 






Sciy "I love yoLi" 

with more io\e 

thdn money. 




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Foriu«lS9S.in(a€t 

Yes ^e nave tine Quality 
diamonds tor S 98 And on up 
to J3 000 You II find them in any 
oneOfourstores And you li 
appreciate rv»o rules every 
Hollands employee lives Oy 



First, wc rtever high pressure, //e 

preterthat ^ou •.hocs.'owly.ir.d 
carefully Loohatcniytnos* 
diarronosthatyoucar, atluru A'e 
r.avea large selection in /our pnce 
category As^asmanyqt,e^tlor.sas 
you like Ae iigiveyuuailtro 
insftirn, Straighi 

Second since 1 9 1 our policy of 
returning your money 'fofan/ 
fiMsoM you re not satisfied 
So ifyouPavf-ineiove andd little 

t)itof money wenave tfiO' q • 
diamond 'or yot. 



llolL'iiifIs elrnelors 



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Page 6 



T€ 



H/1RBINGER 



November 12. 1973 



November 12. 1973 



H 



Student Activities plan trips 



Students and faculty mem- 
bers interested in travel can 
take advantage of four trips 
presently offered by Stu- 
dent Activities. 

These trips include pieces 
as far away as Spain, and 
as close as Colorado. 

On the program for this 
year, are the following 
places: 
SKI TRIP TO SQUAW VAL 



f/«CtMffff 



(From page 9) 

personnel from Colorado 
State University in Fort 
Collons, She has worked one 
year as a counselor and two 
years in students' activities 
and has served one year in 
the Peace Corps 

Between two and four stu- 
dents stop in her office a day 
for career counseling Ms 
Evans hopes to see more. 



LEY. CALIFORNIA: 8 days 
and 7 nights leaving from 
Chicago December 16, and 
returning December 23 In- 
cluded, is round trip air 
fare, hotel, two meals a day, 
and ski lift tickets for each 
day $274 00 

HAWAIIAN TOUR TO THE 
ISLAND OF OAHU 6 days. 
7 nights, from January 20 
to the 26 Includes airfare, 
and lodging, $389 00 
SKI TRIP TO STEAMBOAT, 
COLORADO, 6 days, 7 
nights. January 19 to the 
26 Includes daily lift tickets, 
occupancy in the studio 
condominiums next to the 
lift, and round trip airfare 
$236 00 

SPAIN. COSTA DEL SOL. 
6 days. 7 nights, April 12 
-21. 1974 Includes airfare, 
one night in Paris, France, 
and lodging and continental 
breakfast $362.00. 

For more information, 
contact Student Activities. 
A336. ext 243 



IlHI^HHi VALUABLE ■■^■UHMB 
^ COUPON ^^>5r« 

I ^^''^^ ELECTRONIC '^^^^'l 



Construction 

woes slow 
road progress 



BY JIM MOY 

The Palumbo Construction 
Company has the contract 
for the construction of Al- 
gonquin road Theyarealso 
responsible for filling in the 
ruts and chuck holes which 
have developed in the drive- 
way out front of Harper col- 
lege. For weeks the situa- 
tion with the driveway was 
pathetic The holes grew 
from rain and wear to the 
point where some of them 
were about seven to eight 
inches deep A few- days 
ago Palumbo poured asphalt 
in the driveway which, al- 
though it was a vast im- 
provement over theprevious 
situation, was a poor job. 
In about three to four days 
the paving started to wear 
away to its present condi- 
tion. Now we have a drive- 
way with paved chuck holes 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



^ GAME ROOM !! ^<' 

THE NEWEST ONE AND ONIT 
GAME ROOM IN TOWN 

HMG IHI FAMULT. VOUI OAII AND 

rout rnfNos - Hm-fittiB ifctcAnoN. 

• AIR HOCKEY i^FOOSBAU 



Call for Information about spocial 

ratos for BJrthdoy Portias. Fun Club*. 

ord Special Groups. 

PHONE 259-3480 



llPM^Coj^ 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



With the cold, wet weather 
coming the construction will 
soon be coming to a halt, 
and the construction c m- 
pany will probably leave the 
ripped-up driveways and in- 
tersections like they are. all 
messed up Harper and the 
area business should con- 
tact the State Highway In- 
spection Board and inform 
them of the situation with the 
roads The holes are not 
bad when they can be seen 
and avoided, but when the 
snows come people will be 
driving blind into holesdeep- 
ened by the ice and freezing 
weather 



*•••**♦♦♦ 



Harper on fhe air offered 



By JIM MOY 

Sunday, November 18th, at 
8 a.m. and at 9 p.m. the 
Harper College radio show 
will concern itself with the 
topic at "Campaign and 
Election Reform." 

The Jiscussion will board- 
cast WWMM-FM (92.7) 
and will have Harperassist- 
ant professor of Political 
Science Mary Waite leading 
a panel consisting of such 
distinguished womenas Car- 
olyn Simons. Vice President 
of the League of Women Vo- 



ters Hope Keefe, Co-chair- 
person of the 12th and 13th 
Congressional Districts. In- 
dependent Voters of Illinois; 
and Grace Mary Stern. Coun 
ty Clerk of lake County 
This program is part of 
Harper College's Outreach 
program geared ti> the 
northwest and orthern sub- 
urban areas Theprogramis 
produced and directed by 
Harriet Kandleman of the 
Harper immunity Rela- 
tions Off ice. room A3 13 For 
information call 397-3000. 
extension 261 or 262. 



Mclntyre on rebates 



By 

DLANE DiBARTOLOMEO 



I 
I 



403 E. Euclid, Mt. Prospect 

(lAiT or TMt COlDfN SfAt •f$TAU»ANT) 

OPf N 1 1 A.M. - 7 DAYS A WEEK 

^•ttCNT TOMAN«OI> ONf COUPON *ta CUtTOMCI 

^ VALUABLE 
■ COUPON 



I 
I 



L-AwnCNCE R KirL 

PHOTOGRAPHER 



aBs-aai* 



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use 



',he aw 



4jAM» CCHlin TUNE-UP KITS 

Mrs. CONTAINS H D oOlNrs, CONOfcNSFR, SPAKK PLUGS 

Mon. thru FrI. •♦ ., -,. 

s«f. $4, Sun til '•ty' So.PS 6cyi $7.95 Scyi $10.95 



YOU SAVE 

50% 



PALATINE AUTOMOTIVE SUPPLY CO. 

546 E. NORTHWEST HWY. PALATINE 



Student Senator, Rick Mc- 
lntyre took a strong stand 
against tuition rebates at 
last Thursdays Student Sen- 
ate meeting. His issue was 
directed to the monetary 
awards offered to mem- 
bers of various student clubs 
and organizations. 

In general he disagreed to 
the reasoning behind the ob- 
jectives of eligibility for re- 
bate*. The senator cited fiye 
pitfalls in his limited d^ 
bate of two. five minute 
speeches. 

In his attempt to amend 
the present policy, he argued 
that the opportunity of ob- 
taining a tuition rebate is 
limited only to those heads 
of the organizations, and 
that it left those under the 
heads at an unfair dis- 
advantage because they 
were given secondary con- 
sideration. 

Mclntyre defended the 
assumption that without the 
monetar>' award a definite 
slump in both fhe quality 
and participaUon of the or- 
ganization would become 
evident. He answered to 
that wih an example of a 
recent Senate election of 
candidates. Since there were 
only 15 positions available 
and 19 participated it was 
evidence proving the people 
are there and available. 
That charge was directed to 
Mclntyre by the Harbinger 
claiming that a total volun- 
teer arrangement would not 
only prove to be fatal to the 
organization, but to the stu- 
dent body as a whole. Lar- 
ry Kiel, Managing Kditor 
of The Harbinger defended 
The Harbinger stand on the 
grounds that since from 20 
to 45 hours a week are put 
into the production of the 
paper for the students that 
many would fui it virtual- 
ly impossible to support 
and hold a job. "The tuition 
rebates make it possible for 
staff members to put in all 
the time and talent that 



would not be possible If they 

held down a job." said Kiel. 

The idea of a monetary 

award was cursed by Mc- 

(Turn to page 9) 



Ski Club trips 

BY YVONNE TAGGE 

The Spread Eagle Ski Club 
has a large variety of ski 
trips offered this year 
These trips are offered for 
Harper students, faculty, and 
staff who become members 
of the Ski Club 

The first trip offered this 
year is to Afton Alps. Minn 
This trip is from Nov 22 to 
25 The cost is $44 which 
includes lodging, meals, and 
lift tickets The money for 
this trip is due Nov 13 
The next trip is for the 
weekend of Dec 7-9 to De 
vils Head This trip will 
cost $40 for lodging, meals, 
and lift tickets The money 
for this trip is due Nov 20 
The first trip out west is 
to Squaw Valley. Calf This 
trip will include airfare, 
lodging, meals, lift tickets, 
parties, plus terrific skiing 
on the Olympic mountain A 
$50 deposit is due Nov 16 
and the balance is due Dec 
I 

For the second week of 
Christmas vacation. Dec 
27-31. the Ski Clubplansto 
go to Indian Head in Michi- 
gan This trip will include 
lodging and meals for $6.3 
A deposit of $25 is due Nov. 
13 and the remainder is due 
Dec 4 

Everybody is heading west 
in .January for Steamboat. 
Colorado The .Steamboat 
trip will be January 19 26 
It will include airfare, lod- 
ging, and lift tickets for only 
$2.36 00 

A person must join the Ski 
Club to go on these trips 
The membership dues are 
$5 for the year and this is 
to cover advisory expendi- 
tures Ski Club meetings a re 
held every Tuesday at 12:15 
In D-231 where you may pay 
for any of these trips or you 
can sign up in the Student 
Activities Office (A-336) 



H/1RBINGER 



page 7 



H>4RBINGER FOIUES 



^Of^ In acupuncture, 
class, there art, 
two prmciptes of Nature l/m 
t yan^. tA/hen tiw K*n»i body 
Kas an nbialance iMe use acu- 
puncture. 



Harper's F,K,isr 




^.«tender needles are ntcrted 
•tons pat*ii««ys of ttie body: 
caHad mandtans. This C*n 
»iduc«. ancctha*« Any 
qMiMt«p« 
so Gar? 




MflOM nodical dtsoowtries am 



brought to bght by accidw^ 
■ '"" encujih.ii 



TVi«n,oddlu-.^ -..„ 

o(t*t ctumbta upon 
discoveries d(«ww] 
twartim«T 




MMZ 
'can help 
.people 7* 

iN*neone' 
[OCCOMCry* 



i^n^ 



'<b anSiN«r ALL uour 

^upnittjtations. 
th»« is.fer ^stance, 
acupuncture 





,KI|| THSAf 





Student Activities is looking for people who are willing to work as elec- 
tion judges in the coming Student Representative elections to be held 
Tuesday and Wednesday of this week. Any student who U willing to 
work In such a capacity, please contact Student ActiviUes, or Student 
Senate In room Ad36. 



(From page 1 ) 

does not have to dupli- 
cate the process used in 
the selection of the reg- 
ular board members. 
Student activities, has de- 
termined procedural steps 
to be taken after the referen- 
dum is completed. This pro- 
cedure takes into considera- 
tion the two alternatives of- 
fered to the students. 

If, in the referendum, the 
student body decides to fore- 
go the right to elect this rep- 
resentative and allow the 
student senate to make this 
selection, applications 

would be made available 
to students interested on 
November 21, with these 
applications due on Decem- 
ber 5. The selection .would 



■ Referendym procedure 

then be made by the Senate petitions would be available 
on the 6th of December. 



If the students choose to 
elect the representative by 
means of an open election. 



on November 21, with the 
petitions due December 5. 
The election for the ofTice 
would then be held on the 
11 and 12 of December. 



(From page ,1k) 

Treaties that promised land, 
and freedom to use that larxi 
as the inhabitants saw fit. 
for -- as long as waters 
run and the grass shall 
grow - - were broken, much 
as a train whistle breaks a 
midnight silence 

So easy has it been to ig- 
nore our own and our ances- 
tor's mistakes, we now rise 
up with indignation when the 
Indian stands up and asks 
for his dignity, his birth- 
right, his human rights 



-DAVE GORDON 



Perhaps I have been neg 
iigfnt in my responsibiliiiet 
toward the Blacks and th»-jr 
civil rights Verbally 1 have 
given support, but in action 
1 have done little 

If the Indian ever decides 
to rise again, dig up his war 
bonnet and once again fight 
for what is i rightfully his 
maybe- -just maybe, people 
like me will stand up tall for 
once and join ina fight for 
what is just 

What is jusf Human Dig 
nity. 



» b Vt fsi A t k I t r c t I, t z'l't 

» f ji f * r^> J i i^i t < « • • 1 1 

J V, ■ < r > v" ; ? « I r T « . 1 J ■ 



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I,? H ll.fc^l •* , 



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j ejr i .i r » £ il» T tji 3 t e rl» 
kfiyx II J T ? » t »l«lfc4» ' t 



I «* " - 



>• 5 k r 1 « c, P I r 



Classifieds 



HKI.I'WA.\TKU-K. ..rparltime 
RrncTHl Uh wurk unit rlmnup 
S3.UU per hour - must b< 
16. (nil iS»4i22H. 

1983 \ .iliHRl. orlKinal owner. 
2N,()00 TOi;t>. very auud lunditiun. 
over 20 mile* per K«lkin. 
$3,00. KvenUiRt or wtekend* 
3B2.4M3S. 

AH(»HTH>\ 
and planned parenlhuHKl Inio 

FOR 
(IIUAf.O MKTKOPOI.ITAN 

\kk:a.(o\vknik\tn w. 

.SIDK I,(K ATION- 
PRIVATI-; 
(ONFIDKNTIAI. 
KHSSKUSC. 
KX( KIJ.K.VT A.\» 
( <»Mrl.KTK KACII.ITIKS 
IK K\.SKI» PHYSK tAV.S 
l'KK(i.\A\(Y TKSTI\(. 
WITH IMMKOIATKKKSI I.TS 

l.(m C OST 
M2 772 1151 or 772-1 152 

Pari Time Kveninn work available 
lit tAJm aUohml in KIk Orovearea 
( alMMtMno or .159- 1 .•(OS 

Wanted ■ Clrl to help with house 
work for lamlly of five with work 
iMiH mother. Hour* can be arranit 
•d. Call 35»«nS after 3 00 I'M 

< ombinatlon Frrerer IMriRrrMlor 
Near* $7.5 0(J. Cockliiil irfMr.rrNl 
"ble 6i iMble Teak S2«UKt. 
SI.S.CM) tt S.5 «XI rr«peciivei»«.,. 
M»l 20.17. ^ 



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\ 



Page 8 



K 



Hyf^BINGER 



November 12, 1973 




Photo of the Week 



The selection on the left is an effort from the HAR- 
BINGER staff, the better quality photo on the right 
comes from STEVE FEUTZ. Any worlc will be ac- 
cepted, as long as it is in good taste, and the material 
is of a printable nature. Entries should be brought 
to the HARBINGER offices, A367. 

(Turn to page 9) 



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4frz«9 



(From page 2) 

monies set aside by Congress 
for special purposes; the se- 
cret bombings of Cambodia 
and the subsequent cover 
up of information pertaining 
to the bombing; and, the for- 
mation of a White House 
secret police charged with 
the duties of eliminating pol- 
itical enemies of the Presi- 
dent. 

Ms. Abzug's criticism of 
Mf. Nixon continued as she 
proposed that National pri- 
orities have been sold to 
the highest bidder, an obvi- 
ous reference to the fact 
that she believes big-busi- 
ness is the only segment of 
American society that still 
supports the credability of 
the lYesident. In further sup- 
port of this position, the 
Congresswoman stated that 
the current energy short- 



age is a great boom to the 
large oUcompanies, and that 
other alternatives are avail- 
able without therationlng 
of fuel and other energy. 
On another of her favorite 
topics, the topic of women, 
Ms. Abzugwasquick to point 
out that very few women 
have been implicated In the 
Watergate scandal. In a 
humorous sidelight to this 
she stated that women did 
not get the chance to l>e 
corrupted by power. She 
then very quickly added that 
while this country had Its 
founding fathers, the found- 
ing mothers got lost in the 
political shuffle. 

The address was a some- 
times stimulating, sometimes 
boring affair, but the Ideas 
presented as suggestions for 
possible action by the Amer- 
ican populace were excellent. 
Abzug first called for a re- 
learning of Americanism, 
that is a realignment of prior- 
ities so that they becme 
more in line with what the 




Constitution dictates. A larg- 
er diversification of people 
In government was also 
suggested; the acceptance 
of young people, women^ 
and other minorities. AWd 
finally, but most provoca- 
tive, the passage of an Ab- 
zug sponsored bill that 
would allow for an Interim 
election of a new president 
in the event of the resigna- 
tion, impeachment, or other 
inability of Mr. Nixon to 
continue in office without 
the benefit of a Vlee-presi- 
dent. 

Even though the turnout 
was a typical Harper turn- 
out, Bella Abzug was typ- 
ically Bella Abzug and that 
meant a-very interesting time 
(for the most part) for those 
in attendance. 




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November 12, 1973 



f€ 



H/I^NGER 



Russ. educators visit Harper 



Three female educators 
from the Soviet Union toured 
the Harper Campus Thurs- 
day, November 1 , and talked 
to Dr. Lahti, President, and 
other members of the ad- 
ministrative staff 

The stop at Harper was 
requested by one of the de- 
legates on the tour, as she 
is involved in a similar form 
of educational system In the 
Soviet Union. 

The educators who visited 
Harper were Ralsa Ablova. 
who Is Involved In a similar 
two year program of career 
education in her own coun- 
try. She also holds a doc- 
torate degree in History, and 
isv deputy chief of the divi- 
sion of the USSR Ministry 
of Higher and Secondary 
Specialized Education In 
Moscow. 

FIRST AID 
CLASSES 

Beginning Monday. No- 
vember 19, classes in Red 
Cross first aid will be held 
at Harrington High School, 
room All! The classes in 
first aid «::EL 085-001) 
will continue through Janu- 
ary 21. and is a fully ac- 
credited Red Cross course. 
Students who successfully 
complete the course will be 
awarded a Red Cross first 
aid certificate 

The fee for the course is 
$4 and Is the same for area 
residents who live both In 
and out of Harper's district. 
This fee includes the neces- 
sary texts, materials, and 
bandages. 

Tills course provides par- 
ticipants with the basics 
of applied first aid. which 
could be a life-saving skill 
in the future. 

Interested persons may 
register at the Continuing 
Education Office. Harper 
College, room A319. or 
phone 397-3000. extension 
301 for additional informa- 
tion. 



The two other women who 
visited were Klara Khallik, 
protessor at Polytechnical 
Institute in Tallin and Albina 
Datsenko, deputy chief of the 
department of the Soviet Wo- 
men's Committee. 

This visit was part of an 
exchange sponsored by the 
American Association of 
University Women This 
program also saw female 
educators from the United 
States visit Colleges, and 
Universities in the Soviet 
Union. 

Their special interest in 
this country has been the 
status at women and their 
involvemnt in American 
Education. AAUWrepresen- 



tive, Coralie Tubritt, who is 
traveling with the USSR edu- 
cators, said that there is no 
problem with equal pay for 
women in the USSR 

Mary Carlson, state pre 
sident. and former member 
of Harper's Women's Advi- 
sory Committee, was their 
hostess for their visit to 
this area Earlier in the 
day the women visited State 
Representlves; Chapman 
Dyer, and Macdoiwid and 
state Senator Sapersfeln 

They discussed the equal 
rights ammendment to the 
State Constitution They also 
visited the Clearbrook Cen- 
ter in Palatine 



Plioto Of tlie Week 




Page 9 



IF YOU PLAN TO GRADUATE AT THE END OF 
THE FALL SEMESTER, PLEASE CONTACT THE 
ADMISSIONS OFFICE TO OBTAIN A PETITION 
FOR GRADUATION AND FILE THE FORM WITH 
THE ADMISSIONS OFFICE AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION. CONTACT THF 
ADMISSIONS OFFICE. 397-3000. EXT. 208. 



(Photo by Ron Isgood) 

Cflrrt// firafi: ll§w PIsctMtef Oir§€t9r 



By 

DIANE DiBARTOLOMEO 



So your planning to invest 
one or two years towards 
that certain degree, why else 
would one be here? Once 
you've earned that piece of 
paper, opportunity will come 
knocking at your door, right? 
Well, it's not as easy as one 
might assume What real 
guarantee is there that the 
job one desires will begot- 
ten^ How many more appli - 
cants are there competing 



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for your job? These are a 
few of the many questiors 
that colle^ graduates en- 
counter and unfortunately 
enter blind, and It will prob- 
ably happen to you! 

Don't panic, relief is just 
around the corner A service 
is provided through the 
Placement program design- 
ed to prepare students en 
terlng new jobs 

Answers can be given as 
to how to go about writing 
a letter of introduction, res- 
umes and mock interviews 
are setup The service does 
n t stop at graduationelther 
The Placement Office keeps 
credentials on file for those 
graduates who wish to send 
a portfolio to a new em- 
ployer. 

If you've read this far 
you must be interested Who 
to go see-* Stop by Place- 
ment and ask for Ms Car- 
rell Evans, Bldg A, room 
364 

Ms Evans is the new di- 
rector of Placement who 
helps students obtain em 
ployment and assists with 
applications for education- 
al grants or loans 

Aside from helping Har- 
per students with job or- 
ganization. Ms Evans ser- 
vices extend also to the 
community. 

Ms Evans received her 
masters degree in student 

(Turn to page 6) 




Hawk runner crosses finish line 



(Photo by Chuck Zemeske) 



/tUtlntyre 



(From page 6) 

Intyre, as he suggested other 
alternatives such as plaques 
and honorary banquets for 
participation rewards. He 
proposed that these rewards 
be funded within the organ- 
ization, which would leave 
Senate more money to play 
around with, Mc Intyre point- 
ed out. 

In general the senator did 
not like the monetary motive 
behind the rebates. He would 
like to see liie organiza- 
tions operate under a vol- 
unteer basis for incentive. 
Senator Mclntyre's pro- 



posal will be brought up for 
further discussion at a spec- 
ial Student Senate Meeting 
to be held this Thursday, 
Nov. 15. 



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page 10 



H 



H>I?BINGER 



November 12, 1973. 




Hawk defense blocks Triton pass. 

(Photo by Chuck Zemeske) 



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Football - Hawks fall 



It was a cold, bright sinny 
Saturday afternoon and for 
Coach Eliasik and his Hawits 
it was going to get a lot 
colder and a lot darker be- 
fore the afternoon was over. 
For three quarters the 
Hawks had floundered around 
the .football like some high 
school football team, failing 
to mount any serious threats 
With the exception of a 61 
yard drive early in the first 
half for the only Harper 
score thus far. 

The offense had already 
fumbled four times Three 
of which Triton were able to 
cash in on for touchdowns. 
The defense. too. were 
having their problems Four 
times they were cai«ht flat 
footed by Warrior speedster 
Zeke Harris and countless 
other limes were caught by 
the referees on key downs 
tor interference, roughing- 
the- kicker, and a few other 
no-no's. 

As the third quarter closed 
out. a very dejected Hawk 
team found themselves be- 
hind 28-7 and in very muchof 



need of a miracle and quite 
a few touchdowns 

But hope wasn't lost yet 
After a steady, hard 65 yard 
drive of passing and rushing 
plays down to the Warrior 
one yard line, ledby quarter- 
back Pat Dempsey Dempsey 
went in for the ocore to pull 
Harper within 14 points of 
Triton. 

However the defense was 
not able to hold back the 
Warrior offense, as they 
racked up their fifth and final 
score of the day 
-The HAWKS, now down 35- 
14, had to stop making mis- 
takes and start capitalizing 
on Triton errors.asthe war- 
riors had done through out 
the game 

Failing to move the ball 
farther than mid-field. Har- 
per was forced to give the 
ball to the Warriors A 
fine punt by Dempsey and a 
Hawk roll put the ball on the 
Triton four yard line. 

Then, on the next play 
Harper grabbed one erf the 
two Warrior mistakes that 
were to be made in the next 




five munutes A iumble on 
the nine yard line 

One play later, Dempsey 
hit split end Ervin Kim- 
brough for a nine yard touch- 
down pass. Following a two 
point conversion made the 
score 35-22. Suddenly the 
HAWKS were coming alive 
and with 9:14 leftinthegame 
anything could happen. 

A now fired -up and tougher 
defense held the Warrior 
offense to mid -field and now 
on fourth down were forcing 
Triton to give up the ball 
But not as they had planned 
As the center snapped the 
ball, a wave of red jerseys 
flowed right over the line and 
right on to thepunter. block- 
ing the punt, for Tritons se 
cond mistake Picking up 
the lose ball for the HAWKS 
was Nick Katzer who ran it 
in for the final score, 35- 29 
The HAWKS finished the 
game with 268 total yards 
gained and 14 first downs 
While the Warriors had 329 
total yards and 14 first 
downs. 




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Weary Hawk runner keepH 
up pace. 

HAWKS TAKE FIFTH 
IN REGION IV 

In the Region Four Cross 
Country Championship held 
October 27. at Elgin, the 
Hawk Harriers lead by Mike 
DeLaBruere and Tom Path, 
placed 5 outofthe20partici 
pating teams 

Lincoln Land College, 
from Springfield took first 
place honors. withCollegeof 
DuPage finishing second 
(The College of DuPage is 
the school which broke the 
Hawk 30 game winning streak 
back on October 17) 

Mike DeLaBruere. placed 
fourth individualy on the 4 1 
mile course with the time of 
21:11. behind Glen Wilburn of 
Lincoln Land College, with 
the winning time of 20 28. 
Other Hawk runners who 
placed with low times were 
Tom Path, who placedeighth 
with a time of 21:29. and 
John Jones, who pulled in 
ifith with a time (rf 21:48 
DeLaBruere, Path, and 
Jones, all had times low 
enough to qualify for the 
National meet, to be held 
this year in Tallahassee. 
Florida on November 10th 
Over 100 ParUcipants are 
scheduled to run over a 
four mile course, at Florida 
State University. 



A 



*^^^^ 



JL. 



V 



TE 



H/4RBINGER 

William Rainey Harper College, Algonquin and Roselle Roads, Palatine, Illinois 60067, 312-397-3000 



Vol. 7, No. 10 



November 19, 1973 



Senate ratifies referendum results 



BY JIM MOY 



On Thursday Nov. 15, the 
Student Senate called a spe- 
cial meeting in order to re- 
place the scheduled meeting 
planned for the 29th. on which 
the Leadership seminar is 
being held. In the meeting 



the senate was informed of 
the possibliities of providing 
some sort of mass transpor- 
tation for the students by Dr. 
John Lucas. director of 
Planning and Research. In 
his lecture Dr. Lucas stated 
that the buses, which would 
hold atx3ut 12 to 14 people, 




Ken KlMam of the Harbinger and Donna Skouglund 
cast their baUot* in Wednesday's Referendum. 



would be provided on a con- 
tract basis. When a student 
registers for class he could 
sign a contract for the bus 
and how many days he would 
ride to and from school, this 
would not only save gas on 
the part of the students, but 
this would also save paricing 
space. 

On the subject of tuition 
rebates, the senate voted 
by a large majority to main- 
tain the present system of 
tuition rebates. 

The Harper Farmworkers 
Assoc, was given tenative 
recognition as a student or- 
ganization The Association 
was formed for the purpose 
of informing the student body 
and the community of the 
situation^of the mi grant farm 
workers lit the area. 

The student Leadership 
Workshop is being held on 
Thursday. Nov 29th at the 
Elgin Holiday Inn Intere- 
sted students can signup be- 
fore Wednesday in the Stu- 
dent Senate Office The 



Horper Educational Foundation 
contemplates goals 



The newly established 
Harper College Educational 
Foundation elected officers 
at the director's second or- 
ganizational meeting onOct- 
ober 30. 

Elected to help implement 
the proposed programs of the 
foundation were John C. 
Woods, president; Jack 
Pahl, vice-president; Dr. 
Robert Lahti. Harpers pre- 
sident, seer6ta^y in ex of- 
ficio capacity; and James 
R Lancaster, treasurer. 

The Educational Foun- 
dation has been established 
to provide support for broad- 
er educational opportunities 
and services to students, al- 
umni, and the various com- 
munities which Harper 
serves. 

Among the many projects 
being examined by the Foun- 
dation Directors is a sug- 
gested television distri- 
bution, by cable, into the 
conununity from the Harper 
Learning Resources Center 

Other possible programs 
include the development of 



a Cultural Center through 
expansion of cultural pro- 
gram offerings, an Aero- 
space - Planetarium Center, 
and a Leadership Center 

Foundation gifts could 
promote faculty scholar- 
ships and an expansion of 
student aid programs. 

Increasing the efficiency 
of existing programs for 
Spanish speaking residents 
and for hearing impaired 
students are other areas 
being considered. Senior 
citizens programs and ex- 
pansion of women's pro- 
grams are also possibilities 

In addition to their finan- 
cial services to the college, 
the foundation directors are 
responsible for gifts or loans 
of works of art. historical 
papers "tnd documents, and 
museum specimens. 

Serving as foundation 
directors for terms of three 
years are JohnKuranz. Har- 
rington Hills; Jack Pahl. 
Elk Grove Village; John 
G Woods. Arlington Heights; 
and Robert E Lahti. Pala- 



tine 

Directors with two year 
terms are Ray H. Blakeman. 
Rolling Meadows; Roger A 
Bjorvik. Palatine; William 
J. Palley.Sr. Buffalo Grove; 
and William Simpson, Bar- 
rington. 

Serving one year terms 
are Robert Atcher, Schaum- 
burg; Ms. Virginia Hayter, 
Hoffman Estates; James R. 
Lancaster. Mount Prospect; 
and Ms. Marilyn Marier, 
Arlington Heights 

A third organizational 
meeting will be held Nove- 
mber 27, following whichthe 
foundation directors plan to 
begin regular quarterly 
meetings in January. 
" All residents of the Har- 
per served communities who 
desire more information 
concerning the foundation 
are encouraged to call the 
office of President Robert 
Lahti at 397-3000. extension 
224, foundation president 
Hohn Woods at 391-2060, or 
any other foundation direc- 
tor 



workshop is to be an all day 
affair and it is free. 

The result of the stu- 
dent referendum were intro- 
duced and ratified by the se- 
nate by a unaninK>us vote. 
The results being: that the 
student representative to the 
board of trustees is that he 
be elected by the students. 
be a full time student, a 
resident of the Harper dis- 
trict, and any vacancy is to 
be filled by appointment by 
the senate 

Petitioning procedures 
were revised for the student 
Rep. election Those peti- 
tioning will now have tohave 
250 valid signatures Instead 
of the usual 50 

The senate voted to inves- 
tigate the pas sib 11 ty of com- 
piling a list of reputable law- 
yers for use by the students 
This list would come from 



the American Bar Assoc or 
the Illinois Bar assoc. The 
lawyers would be listed 
under specialties such as 
criminal law. trial law, and 
civil suit 

A proposal for the form- 
alization of an electioncom- 
mittee was introduced by 
Larry Kiel. It stated that 
there be formed a standing 
committee on election pro- 
cedures that would consist of 
2 senators and three non- 
political oriented students, 
with the chairman of the 
committee being a student 
and not a senator This 
proposal can t>e accom- 
plished within the present 
constitution. This would e- 
limlnate the need to form a 
new committee l)efore each 
individual election. 

The next senate meeting 
will be held on Thursday, 
December 6. at 12:30, in 
Room A242. 



"Focus: Northwest" talk show 



Panel members will 
discuss "Hearing Disabili- 
ties and Supportive Facili - 
ties" November 25 on the 
Harper College Ulk show. 
"Focus Northwest" on FM 
radio station WWMM (92 7) 
Air time is 8 am . with a 
rebroedcast at 9 p m 

Moderator Elizabeth Mc- 
Kay, Director of Harper's 




Ms. Ellzahelh McKay. Direc- 
tor of the Hearing Impaired, 
will be leading the talk nhow. 
Photo by L. R. Kiel 



Hearing Impaired Program, 
will lead panel members Dr. 
Katherine Kalbacher, Hear- 
ing Impaired instructor at 
Harper. Louise Wilson. 

Hearing Impaired Program. 
Hersey High School; and Kay 
Munro. Counselor for Hear- 
ing Impaired, Divisionof Vo- 
cational Rehabilitation 

Mrs Munro states, "The 
ramifications of deafness 
are so subltle it's in- 

visible . frustrating. 

Communication is difficult" 

Discussion will center a - 
round Illinois' supportive 
facilities for the hearing im- 
paired, claimed to be the best 
in the country, with an out- 
standing number of six coun- 
selors available to northwest 
suburban residents. 

The "Focus: Northwest" 
radio series originates from 
Harper College s Office of 
Community Relations as part 
of the outreach program de- 
signed to serve residents of 
the northwest suburbs The 
program is produced and di- 
rected by Harriet Kandel- 
man. 



Dave Gordon on "the prez" 
On<ampus lawyer reviewed 



page 6 
poge 4 



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H/1RBINGER 



November I9, 1973 



Harbinger serves as a tool of English 



By SUE POLLACK 

The Harbinger has been 
serving as a teaching aid in 
the Communications Divi- 
sion, helping Harper's inter- 
national students learn Eng- 



lish as a second language. 
Ms. Karen Kuzel, part- 
time English instructor, uses 
the Harbinger in her classes 
for foreign students . and 
finds that it benefits them 
by increasing their aware- 



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Pre Graduate Program 
French 
German 
History 
Home Economics 

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General Home Economcs 

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Italian 

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Psychology 
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ness of Harper as well as 
their understanding of writ- 
ten English. Such compre- 
hension, she said, along with 
fluency in speaking English 
is of utmost importance to 
these students. The English 
class for speakers of other 
languages is one of the 
few opportunities for success 
in Harper's classes and 
exams and in making 
friends. Many of them at 
tend American colleges as 
guests of the U.S. State 
Department; most of them 
are granted an 1-20 visa that 
allows them to study here but 
expects them to return to 
their native country when 
their education is finished. 
Ms. Kruzel paralled the 
acquisition of English by her 
foreign students to the proc- 
ess a small child goes 
through in order to learn to 
speak; first, she said, they 
sort out distinguishing 
sounds, rehearse the sounds. 



and then put them together. 
Familiarity with the mark- 
ing system comes next and 
then the two, oral and writ- 
ten, are connected. 

Fluency in English by 
the international student 
comes at varying speeds, de- 
pending on the individual, 
his previous language ex- 
perience, and whether the 
second language is spoken 
at home and used out of 
the school environment. An 
absolute necessity for Eng- 
lish, Ms. Kru2el noted, can 
make fluency even more 
rapid. 

The Harbinger helps in 
this process at the stage of 
linking what is heard with 
what is written, anc^ Ms. 
Kruzel reported that her 
intern adonal students en- 
Joy reading it as part of 
their English-acquiring ex- 
perience. The college news- 
paper is written "more at 
their level" in its vocabu- 



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lary and style, she said, 
than regular newspapers 
are; its articles are read 
out loud and then discuss- 
ed for their meaning, value, 
and slant. 

Ms. Kruzel flnds the Har- 
binger's crossword puzzles 
especially useful in further- 
studying the patterns 
of words. She uses as much 
of a gaming approach as she 
can, to avoid thetediousness 
of learning a language by 
rote, and varies her mater- 
ials so that the students look 
forward to them more be- 
cause they are used irreg- 
ularly. 

There may be somewhat 
of a language barrier In 
some of Ms. KruzeFs classes, 
for some of the students are 
barely literate in their own 
language when they begin 
school in the U.S., and Ms. 
Knizel speaks only Eng- 
lish fluently. In her two 
years of teaching at Har- 
per, however, she has man- 
aged to effectively commun- 
icate with her students and 
enable them, in turn, to 
communicate with others, 
using their new English 
skills. Though not a major 
tool in this success, the Har- 
binger has at least contrib- 
uted to bringing the inter- 
national student closer to 
his Chicago-area counter- 
part 



Referendum acts 
as an indicator 

BY STEVE BOWMAN 

ROBERT HAYHURST 

With the turnout of the 
Student Referendum equal- 
ing and surpassing the pre- 
vious Senate Elections it ap- 
pears that maybe students 
at Harper are waking up to 
the fact there is more to do 
here than go to class and 
study (both of these are im- 
portant of course). 

It seems that this could 
be important because it does 
represent students In a very 
direct way to the higher ups 
In the administration So 
mayt)e this is going to be an 
indicator that students here 
are beginning to take inter- 
est in the college. This came 
about because of a special 
bill no HB 1628 and Pu- 
blic Act 78-822. This of 
course requires the college 
to place a student on the 
board as a non-voting mem- 
ber. The referendum results 
will not be known as of this 
writing, bil, whatever they 
will be it will prove that 
there still are people out 
there that do care about what 
Is happening to and In this 
our college. 



November 19, 1973 



f€ 



H>f?BINGER 



Page 3 



Assoc. Professor 
exhibits art 

John Knudsen, associate 
pr(tfessor of Art at Harper 
College, currently has an 
exhibition of his works at the 
University of Illinois, Cham- 
paign 

The exhibition of 50 paint- 
ings and prints will continue 
through November 30 In the 
Illinois Memorial Union art 
gallery. 

Several of the works have 
been exhibited at the Art 
Institute di Chicago during 
the last four "Chicago and 
Vicinity" exhibitions Other 
pieces were completed this 
summer. 

A Palatine resident, Knud- 
sen holds a master's degree 
in painting and print making 
from the Sute University of 
Iowa. He has exhibited in 
many national and regional 
shows and has bad one-man 
shows around the country 

Knudsen will be exhibiting 
works during January at Lu- 
ther College, Decorah. Iowa. 

During the sprang semes- 
ter, Knudsen will be on sab- 
batical leave for study in 
Paris under Sunley William 
Hayter. leader In contem- 
porary print making tech- 
nk)ues. 

Witch for tit 
"Tilt Volet \ Dtc. 5 

For the tiiird year. JNM 
235. a Harper journalism 
class, will publish Its la- 
boratory newspaper, "The 
Voice." The newspaper Is 20 
pages of professional exper- 
ience, according to associate 
professor Henry Roepken, 
coordinator of the Journal- 
Ism career program Mem- 
bers of the Copy Reading and 
Editing class have complete 
responsibility for the publl 
cation They sell adverti- 
sing to local merchants to 
cover the printer's costs, 
handle all editorial duties, 
and actually "hawk" the 
paper Emphasis of editorial 
copy is In-depth coverage of 
campus news An effort Is 
made to find stories that are 
different or unusual and 
might not appear elsewhere 



OFB^MS 

On Campus— 

OFFICIAL FRISBEE TOURNAMENT COMING UP. 
WATCH FOR MORE DETAILS. 

Phyllis Curtin, soprano soloist of Metropolitan Opera 
and Vienna State Opera fame, to present concert, 
Nov. 29. 8:00 p.m., Bldg. A, Lounge, free. 

Harper College Community Orchestra Concert, under 
direction of Dr. George Makas, Dec. 3, 8:00 p.in., 
Bldg. A, Lounge, free. 

Harper College Community Chorus, directed by An- 
thony Mo^tardo, presents concert Dec. 4, accompan- 
ied by Harper College Community Orchestra, 8:00 
p.m., Lounge, Bldg. A, free. 

Coffee House, Nov. 27, featuring the Rose Hip String 
Band, 12:00, Lounge. 

"Bowling", featuring trick shots of Don Ellis. "Cue 
Masters", featuring fancy shots on a pocket billiard 
table by Jimmy Caras, Nov. 20 & 21. "Come Ski 
With Me", Jean Claude KUly skis die slopes in the 
Western U.S., Nov. 27 & 28. All on channel 6. cam- 
pus television, at 10 & 11 a.m., 12 noon, 1, 6. 7. 
& 8 p.m. 

Music— 

Dooble Brothers, Auditorium Theatre, Nov. 23 & 24, 

Ph. 922-21 10. 
Josephine Baker, Mill Run Theatre, Nov. 22-25, Ph. 

298-2170. 
An Evening with Hawkwlnd, Nov. 26, Auditorium 

Theatre. 
BurrTUstrom & the Kuklapolitans: A Retrospective, 

Nov. 26, Goodman Theatre, Ph. 236-2337. 
Who, at the Amphitheatre, Nov. 29. 
Cheech & Chong. Auditorium Theatre. Nov. 21, 8:00 

p.m. Ph. 922-2110. 
Johmy Mathls, at the Arle Crown, Nov. 12-24. 
Humble Pie, at the AmphlUieatre, Dec. 9. ^ 

Theatre— 

"Butiey ", starring Brian Bedford, Studebaker Thea- 
tt-e. Ph. 922-2973. 

"Jacques Brel is Alive and Well and Living in Paris", 
starring Chita Rivera & Gilbert Price. At the Ivan- 
how. Ph. 248-6800 or GR 2-271 1. 
"A Doll's House", Goodman Theatre. Ph. 236-2337. 

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We at the HARBINGER a re 
sole judges of the material 
- to be used, and there Is no 
guarantee that material sub- 
mitted will be used. 

All entries must be de- 
livered to our office A 367, 
material must be picked up 
on before the following Wed- 
nesday 



This photo was submitted 
by PAUL CORD, a member 
of the HARBINGER staff 

We. will consider any work 
submitted to us Material 
should be In good taste, and 
of a subject that we con- 
sider printable 

Submissions must be in 
our office no later than Wed- 
nesday prior to the issue 
date 




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H/1?BINGER 



•^- 



oupur 




MIm Io read Ms? 



"Tell me sir, would you like for one of the election judges to stop 
by your home this afternoon, and allow you to vote for President?" 

"Ah yes. I see, you are busy, aren't you. I know that you don't 
have the time to vote for something that you really don't want to. 
I can understand this fully." 

"Tell me sir, would you like for one of the election Judges to stop 
by your home, this afternoon, and allow you to vote for President?" 

"All right sir, 1 will send someone out to ^our house between three 
and four." 

Do you remember the old days, when the responsibility for voter 
turnout was the responsibility of the individual? 

It would appear that the above scene could come true. If the indica- 
tion is the recent Harper Referendum. The vote turnout was better 
than it tias been in the recent past, but this Is due to the fact that the 
Student Senators carried ballots to the various lecture halls through- 
out the campus, thus, bringing the election to the students. 

We at the HARBINGER laud the Student Senate for their time 
and effort In attempting to make this election more representative 
of the opinion of the student body. 

We must aUo condemn the individuals on this campus who chooM 
Io take the secluded shelter beneath the rocks of apathy. 

To those of you who declare this comparison to be invalid due to 
the difference In magnitude of the elections involved, we can only 
say that you are entitled to your opinion, but both elections are im- 
portant in that both are lessons In democracy. 

Working within the framework of the system at Harper is good 
practice in laboring within any Institution, be It Na^onal Govern- 
ment or BusiacM. 

With the referendum behind us, there is nothing that can be done 
about the method of selection to be used. We feel that If the turn out 
for the coming election on the representatives la as poor as It has 
been in the past, the student body as individuals should take a good 
look at themselves, and realize that by their silence they have loet 
their voice In affairs on this campus. 

It Is easy for the Individual to complain about the way that things 
are going around the camptis, but the more difficult task is to get out 
and do something about it. Get involved, make your presence (^t Now 
is a good time to get In practice for the rest of your life. 

There Is a limit as to how much non-Involvement a system can 
tolerate before reform must occur. If there Is reform in the present 
system. It would probably be towards a less student involved and 
regulated activity, and towards a more administrative controlled 
system, where the student would find the amount of free expression 
curtailed and posslbily eliminated. This would leave the individual 
student at the mercy of the administration in such areas as tuition, 
activity fee, how money is to be spent within the activities of the 
school- in general, stripping the student body of whatever voice it 
may presently possess. 

We have found that the biggest critics of the school are those 
who remain unlnvolved and refrain from any attempt to change the 
system to conform to their views, or ask the system to provide some- 
thing for them to get involved in. 

There are people on this campus who. through their involvement, 
are able to get things accomplished. This is due to the fact that they 
are the ones who put the time and effort into getting their ideas 
across. 

The Student Senate has a say in how things are to be run for the in- 
dividual student, and trying to fulfill their obligation to the student body 
is rough to do, when no one will take the time to teU them whal they 
would like to see done, and then to work with their representative body 
toward some possible completion of this matter. 

When no one will express their views, ideas, and suggestions to the 
Student Senate, or to any other member of the activities department, 
the people who get Involved have to come up with all the suggestions, 
and sometimes suggestldns are not at hand, for they do not know 
what you want. 

While It is true that it Is easier to be a member of the unlnvolved 
crowd and fail to express an opinion that might shock your friends, 
it is a matter of whether or not you want to be a member of the 
apathetic crowd, or one of the few who choose to shed the shackles 
of non-involvement and make your opinions felt as an individual. 
But who cares? 



November 19. 1973 



Lawyer on campus? 

Student Senate President, Robert Hayhurst's request 
for an on-campus lawyer Is a dream which will prob- 
ably not come true for Harper students. 

There Is no doubt th^t having a lawyer on campus 
would be one of the better and more beneficial servkres 
offered by the Senate, but at face value it would be 
one of the most unsuccessful endeavors Senate could at- 
tempt 

The cost Involved would greatly exceed the principle. 
Senate proposes that the lawyer will be funded from 
the special project fund, which Incldently is $1,175. This 
would not cover the expenses involved for providing such 
a service. If the Senate did attempt to offer the service, the 
funding would have to be taken from other budgeted or- 
ganizations. 

Granted, a number of well known colleges have free 
legal servkes provided for the students, but one must 
look to the circumstances and compare the differences. 
These colleges are at an advantage because they are 
four year instlhitlons; there are more students, and in 
effect more of a need. Tuition rates are much higher 
and so are the activity fees, which is the source of rev- 
enue for the Senate. Harper is only a two year institu- 
tion and its funds are limited. 

The idea is basically good on the outside, but 
again, i-evlewlng the scope of the project, It would be 
virtually impossible. 

Right now the Senate is in the process of attain- 
ing a list of lawyers for students to refer to for legal 
counseling. If this project receives a firm response the 
Senate will Investigate the possibilities of having the 
lawyer on-campus. 

In the past we've asked the Student Senate to look 
within their structure for improvement, now that they 
are exploring the outside there will Indoubtedly be 
more Involved. It will take more than the Senate Itself 
to accomplish this task. The Student vSenate at Harper 
seems to be working toward more Involvement by 
' and for the Individual. 




«H>«BINGER # 



Editor-in-chief 
Managing Editor 
Business Manager 
Activities Manager 
Cartoon Editor 
Photo Editor 
I'hotographers 



^Mane DlBartolomeo 
•'^ L. R. Kiel 

Gary Zdeb 

Heidi .lohnson 

Dennis Murray 

Chuck Zemeske 

Greg Conway, Paul Cord, Ken 

Klssam, and Mike Wellman 



Contriounng Matt 
Mary Beth Christy, Dave Gordon. Sue Pollack, Steve 
Schlosser, Bill Whitehead, Rich Kusnierek, Joyce Tarwid, 
George Polales and Elaine McAskill 

Advisor 
Mr. Sturdevant 

The HARBIN'C.EK is the student publication for the 
Harper College campus community, published wceitiy 
except during holidays and mid-terms. All opinions ex- 
pressed on the editorial page or in the columns are 
those of the writer, and are not necessarily •those of the 
college. Its administration, faculty or student body. 

For information on advertising, rates and publica- 
tion schedule, call or write Harbinger Musiness Of- 
fice. 

William Ralney Harper College. Algonquin and 
Hoselle Hds., i'alatine. Illinois 60067. I'hone num 
b^r 397-3000, ext. 272 and 460. 



[ 



November 19. 1973 



T€ 



H/1?BINGER 



Page 5 



>iNPur 



Looking Class 



LOOKING GLASS 

(An Anonymous Article by 
an Inept Observer) 

Ah, absolutely amazing! 
IiKredible! Ha! Intelligence 
must breed eupldlty! How 
so, you say? What type of 
paradox Is this? Let me 
first expound on the Intel- 
Uegence of your group. Har- 
per College. 

First, and most obvious 
Harper is a college, only two 
years although it be. An 
Institute of higher learning 
which excludes rigid admis- 
sion requirements but none- 
the less, attracts a good por- 
tion of the communities' in- 
telligent people. Secondly, 
this college offers some of 
the finest facilities available 
for scientific and Intellec- 
tual pursuit at a two year 
level. This college also has 
students capable of utilizing 
the highly sophisticated 
equipment, concepts, and 
notions being taught These 
students are those who 
readily assimilate the Infor- 
mation, and there b y 
Increase their knowledge 
and awareness. One must ' 
acknowledge these points 
as good proob of the 
brainpower scattered 

throughout this campus. 
Why then are there so many 
scatter brains In this school? 
Indeed only a person of 
great intellectual capabil- 
ity could look directly at 
the "Fire Exit Only" signs 
on some of the library doors 
and proceed to open that 
door. Tliere Is a possibility 
that these people are Fire 
I>epartment personnel eso- 
terically sent on a surprise 
inspection to catch Harper 
unprepared. And the result- 
ing loud obnoxious buzzer 
is proof that they have ac- 
complished their mission. 
Very clever! 

Another astounding credit 
to the mentality level of 
Harper College students is 
the interpretation that some 
students are able to produce 
from reading instructions. 
For instance, the sign that 



states. "This Library Is For 
The Use of Everyone. Please 
Respect the Rights of 
Others". The creativity bab- 
bled forth by some students 
as they Interpret this jslea 
for a subdued atmosphere 
Is ear-shattering. For In- 
stance, those thoughtful fel- 
lows the other day in the 
library respected my right 
to study by telling me about 
tiie 427, heavy block, dual 
carbed, four-speed In the 
bucket seat, Edsel frorti 
across the room. A real bit 
of genius! 

Probably the most bril- 
liant use of Harper College 
gray matter was In the deri- 
vation of the old block the 
door routine. This scheme 
probably contrived by 
Womens'-Llppers Uivolves 
the uRe of the abundant dou- 
ble-door entrances at Har- 
per. The college board could 
have saved some money If 
they would have had the fore- 
sight and Intelligence that 
some students exhibit If the 
board had foreseen this con- 
tingency, all the entrances 
could have been a single 
door. Reason? Many alert 
students have the great keen- 
ness of mind and percep- 
tion to note that a doorway 
with people walking out will 
not allow other peopfe to 
walk in at the same time. 
And to prove this point these 
Intellectual giants stand In 
the single opened doorway 
waiting for the oncoming 
traffic to cfear while not 
opening the other door. If 
only Newton or Einstein 
could have thought of this 
profound example they un- 
doubtedly would have used 
it in expressing their theor- 
ems. Simply stated they 
might have sounded some- 
thing like this, "This opened 
right hand door will not al- 
low two bodies to occupy 
the same entrance at the 
same time" and "The left 
hand door at rest remains at 
rest until opened". Brilliant 
thinking kids! Keep up the 
intelligent breeding of stu- 
pidity. Harper College stu- 
dents. 



Letters 
welcome 



We welcome and encourage let - 
ters to the editor. They are 
subject to editing and conden- 
sation to meet space and style 
requirements. and each must 
bear the writer's signature and 
address. Names may be with- 
held from publication at the writ- 
er's request, but signed letters 
will take precedence. 



-V 




c-»,. 



'^''^\ 




Female appeals for reason 



I have something to say to 
M Chauvanist. women's lib- 
bers and anyone else who 
may be interested 

Men and women were 
made the way they we^e to 
survive up to now, to make 
it to this day and age (and 
hopefully longer) Nomatter 
whether you figure some 
supreme being made us this 
way or we became this way 
through a long process of 
miAation. adaptation and 
natural selection Malesand 
females are different, no two 
waysaboutit Forsome rea- 
son, this difference was sel- 
ectively advantageous at the 
beginning of homo sapiens 
For example, what if women 
of height X weighed the same 
as all men of the same 
height Think of the strain 
on the women's circulation 
and body In child rearing, 
and even how much more food 
it would take to keep the wo 
men at this weight This 
would have been a disad- 
vantage when homo sapiens 
were just beginning This 
extra food could be used to 
feed the children, who would 
carry on the "race," which 
was important, ortheywould 
have died out The men, at 



this time, did harder work 
and were concerned with de- 
fense of the group Select- 
ion thus favored them to 
weigh more But these were 
the conditions of long ago 
I'm not saying we should 
or will stay this way, how^ 
ever, the evolutionary pro- 
cess (mutation, adaptation, 
natural selection, etc ) takes 
time If women arc going 
to "adapt" physically to 
this "liberation," we would 
most likely not be the ones 
to see it happen 

Im not saying "women's 
lib " is entirely no good 
Certain aspects of it are in- 
deed valid and mo re power to 
those trying to do something 
about It This is one aspect 
of the evolutionary pro- 
cess (social selection) we 
can do something about 
while waitingfortherestof it 
to happen However, to those 
women fighting for the tri- 
vial aspects of the 
movement, and to those, both 
male and female, who waste 
their time cutting do-.-.n the 
movement and arguing, all I 
have to say is that there 
are many more important 
and worthwhile things you 
could be spending your time 
on 



LETTERS 
WELCOME 

The "Harbinger" is open 
to opinions and complaints 
presented^ in a mature and 
business-like manner Only 
letters with names and ad- 
dresses will be considered 
for this page Signatures 
will be withheld on request, 
but signed letters will be gi- 
ven priority Letters are 
limited to "iOO words max- 
imum and are subject to 
editing 




•r 



N 



J 



^ 



\ 



.V. -•- ^==i^ 



L 



Page 6 



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H/1R6INGER 



November 19, 1973 



November 19, 1973 



T€ 



H>1^NGER 



page 7 




g^uase sievj^m 



as to what have might other- 
wise been a poor imitation 
of the earlier "SO's record- 
ings. 

Reunions, Pajama parties, 
drlve-in movies and a spe- 
cial hangout called Burger 
Palace were some of the 
scenes and events which de- 
picted the social values of 
the era. 

The actors did well with 
what they had intheir script. 
Marily Henner who played 
the character of Marty took 
a leave of absence from the 
University of Chicago in or- 
der to join the "Grease" 
cast. Her performance was 
strong and she related to the 
audience very well. This 
production marks her stage 
debut 

The performers all re- 
ceived a welcome response 



BY DIANE DIBARTOLOMEO 

The musical comedy, 
"Grease" was another 
attempt to restore memories 
of those nostalgic years of 
the '50s 

The play centered around 
the social activities of high- 
schoolers and what they 
valued in that amazing era 

The script in itself would 
have not been complete with- 
out the support of the musi- 
cal score. 

Original music and lyrics 
by Jim Jabobs and Warren 
Casey helped in making the 
revival a success Numbers 
such as "We go together" 
and "It's Raining on Prom 
Night" presented Interest. 



from the audience, as was 
expected, primarily from 
those who engaged In the hap- 
penings of that time. 

As for myself, I found 
It amusing bit not asgrip- 
ping aslhadexpected. There 
was one scene which 1 thought 
was In bad taste, and should 
have been discarded since it 
didn't do much for the audi- 
ence either. 

"Grease" might have not 
proven to be that great of a 
comedy as predicted, but It 
did depict the actual values 
of teerts, for that I give It 
credit. Everything about It 
related to those Who lived 
that era, and that In Itself 
was as close as success as 
could be. 



^m 




Can you remember a few 
months ago, when Richard 
M. Nixon's name was being 
mentioned in connection with 
the Nobel Peace Prize? 

How did you feel about the 
idea? 

Frankly, I was amused. I 
thought that It was rather 
foolish to consider a man 
whose qualities are of a very 



1^ i^>^ii»#i>^ii^»^ii» i#»^<»^<»^nO>ii»ii»ii<»ii«>n»n»ii»'i 



FvdilDucker 




Route 

19 and 

Wise Road 

HANOVER PARK 



WILL BE OPEN 

THANKSGIVING 
3p.m. - la.m. 



flAWklNGt 

^A COMPLETE GAME ROOM 



Air Hockey 



PLENTY OF HOLIDAY 

EXCITEMENT 






I 

i 

'I 

i 

r 



FiMoiicker 




THIS 
COUPON 

enfitles one 

Harper 
Student to 

35 cent beer. 

Offer good 
11/20 to 11/24. 



RT. 19 & WISE HANDOVER PARK 



} 




PART TIME OPENINGS 

From 5 -10 P.M. MON. tfiro FRI. 

298^00 Ext. 407 PAY ! )2.73 HOURLY 

Work: Soldering & Making Cabl«t 

VACATION . SICK PfY . CO. HOLIDAYS 

CALL NOW FOR INFO. 

SEARLE ANALYTIC - 3«rni« McNichol 



TID BITS RESTAURANT 

in Wbodfield Mall 
NEEDS FULL & PART TIME HELP. 



Grillman 

Busboyt 

Waitresses 



CALL MT. TIDBIT 



593-8420 




Interviewing at Schaumburg Room 
General Offices, Woodfleld Mall 
Wednesday. 10-4 



43 S. DUN "C N 
ARLINGTON HEIGH'-S lll'?-"^'r 
BARBARA CARTER 
439 'U28 






Jr&Miss 
Sizes 

Moderate 
PRICES 

luncheon 
fashion 

MODELS WANTED SHOWS 



Part Time 



questionable nature- -if they 
exist at all. 

Add to that the fact that 
Nixon did little to deserve 
the type of recognition that 
goes with the Noble Prize. 
He did keep us out at Nor- 
thern Ireland, but 1 don't 
think that ranks with the 
achievements of a certain 
Mr. Kissinger and his as- 
sociates. 

So as not to be accused 
of being prejudiced. I would 
like, at this time, to offer 
a few awards that Mr. Nixon 
most certainly does deserve. 

In acknowledgement of Mr. 
Nixon's great contributions 
in the field of economics, I 
think he could have been 
metttloned in connection with 
the Noble Prize for Econo- 
mics. 

Our President's discovery 
that when prices and wages 
are frozen, prices still tend 
to rise while wages remain 
stationary has to rank with 
the great economic discove- 
ries of our age. 

Mr. Nixon's name has also 
coihe up in reference to a 
citation of merit offered by 
the American Bull -Shippers 
Association. This citation 
is to be given to the man who 
had all the answerk,to back 
up the meat industry oUi li^^ 
the beef shortage. It is to 
be remembered here that 
Mr. Nixon seems to have an 
ansiver for everything 

He is also the leading 
candidate for the Howard Co - 
sell sound- alike award This 
award is presented to the 
man who talks the most and 
says the least in any given 
period of time 

Finally, and justly so. the 
Association of Proctologists 
are going to make Mr Nix- 
on an honorary member of 
the Rigid- Digit Association 
This award is, or should be. 
self-explanatory. 

Obviously, these awards 
are ridiculous, but then isn't 
this administration? 



Kick the habit 



When was the last time 
you really smelledthe spring 
flowers or freshly mowed 
lawn? Does your food taste 
bland? Can you see things 
clearly thru that layer of 
smoke ahead? The world 
could look much better again 
if you stopped smoking. 

Health Service will pre- 
sent a seminar on the ha- 
zards of cigarette smoking 
Thursday, November 29 
/rom 12:30-2:00 P.M InE- 
106 Ms Carma Phillips, 
Special Consultant for School 
Health Education from the 
Chicago Lung Association, 
will discuss the various^ 
health aspects as well as how 
the habit began, why women 
have more difficulty quitting 
than men and most impor- 
tant, suggestions on how to 
quit. 



H>1RBINGER FCHLIES 



►r* *Weit it'6 ^ 
ThanksgivmgT 
Tirrtc Co- turlt^j 
dinners, pump4tr» 
pte.l other goodies 
And (br rawily reunions! 





Thanksjgiving,;?, A day 

tor the a(fi!erti«ing media to 
g<i« thanks, (or on this day 
commercial estaWishmentft 
dciuge potential consumers 
withlhe laonching oC thew 
Oristmas ad campatgns. 





WEEK. IN 

OSrORTION 

HELLS ANGELS: COMMUNITY PILLARS? 

For the second time in two months the Red Cross 
refused to send a mobile blood bank to collect dona- 
tions from Southern California's most notorious motor- 
cyclists, the Hells Angels . 

After being stiffed the first time, some 550 bikers 
showed up at a blood bank in the area, and volun- 
teered to donate. The staff was somewhat over- 
whelmed because they only had the facilities to accept 
150 pints. 

Tlie incident is representative of a new attempt by 
the Hells Angels to change their image in the com- 
munity. At the present time they're also involved 
in an anti-heroin drive in the Los Angeles area aim- 
ed at the 12 to 20 year old. 

"Laco Bob" Lawrence, President of the L.A. An- 
gele , also confirmed that over 500 bikers are plan- 
ning a massive toys for tots campaign on November 
25. They want to ride along an announced course, 
and pick up toys that are still in good condition, 
and deliver them to the mayor. Earlier the Angels 
asked the Marines to give them a hand in the toy 
campaign but they got an icy reception. They aren't 
sure how Mayor Bradley is going to like taking part 
in their effort either. 

REFUSES GOVERNMENT MONEY 

A 70 year old Italian farmer, refused payment 
for damage done to his property during a recent 
hall storm. "I refused because the state is not res- 
ponsible for the weather," the farmer said. 

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE AT HARPER 

During an English class for foreign-born, the sen- 
tence to be changed to the past tense was, "He gives 
her a present." One earnest gentleman's reply was, 
"He gave her a past." 



By MURRAY AND MOY this mass of Jumbled letters. 

See if you can find them. 

The words or phrases hid- Happy drinking, 
den in the puzzle below are 

for all you drinkers. There The answers will be print- 
are twenty-one mixed drinks ed in the next issue of the 
or brand names of liquor in HARBINGER. 



J L P 

II V 

H A F 

r: u E 

H T n 

Y H A 

y « F 

A P U 

L t-i U 

K ': 

SCI! 

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B li U 
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C T U 

K u i; 

COD 

U S N 

K A il 



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u h 

L E 

3 '.•; 

B D 

U R 

R I 

" Y 

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A R 

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D G 

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£ C 

P M 

C S 

L U 



H I R 

J J S 

P L S 

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I I Q 

X i: I 

p K :; 

I-: L A 

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CDF 

V Y v; 

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ABU 

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personals 



: 



D, Gordon, meet me at the office 
Tuesday oighl for another round 
of uninhibited strip poker. Keform- 
ed. 

God was a photoKrapher. H.G. 
Public Notice, Am not responsible 
for any pictures of the female 
sex when they were over-exposed. 
J.C. 

Lost and Found . . . Have found 
two tapes in the vicinity of Wash- 
Inton IXC. Please contact. A. Cox. 
L.K.K. has a fetish for feet, pre- 
fers a slsc 10^1/2. 
For «n Obitcene phone-call, call 
Smutlipt at 255-3219. 
IMsriatimer of Debts. Responsible 
for my debts and siKnature as of 
January 21. 1977. K.M.N., White 
House, Washinicton. D.C. 
Lexat NoHce. As of November 14. 
1973, Dave Gordon was officially 
commissioned staff psychiatrist of 
1'he HarbtnRer. 

Gary, May the nicotine of borrow- 
ed clKarettes scorch your lunfs. 
John. Maskinc tape does wonders 
for pulling together dislocated spin- 
al discs and severed groin mus 



■tin-head uses Simonise Mi 
Wax to shine his cue ball. 
Rvfiia. I miss you. please come 
back to Kreedonia, the dolor Is 
waiting. (Mis. 

Snake, Pleaae sUiher home. I mlas 
your tongue. Poopsie. 
Cc4 a pbcce of the rock at L. U. 
Dear Jim. Ileaae stop digging the 
hole in your 'back yard, '^ere !• 
an easier way to get lu China, 
innkie 

To Whom It May Concern: Dre- 
chem! I ! Thank you. 
Hoi Up* melts the heartsofmany 
Scorched. 

Mrtry Smith. I love you. John Doe. 
IV. nn L.. The moment you decide 
to run for .Senator, will be the same 
time you will run for your life 
M Afla. 

The Mafia is Jusi a gang bang 
outfit. Clyde. 

A token in hand gathers no mots. 
Sue H. I am shy and alone. Please 
call me. Jim M. 

Bobby Douglas, Please see Gary 
Huff for passing Instruction, Abe 
Gibron. 

Miiry M.. I love your mind, I 
want to take your picture, my 
place at midnight. Paul C. 
Joan E. Thanks fdr your pati- 
ence. Used Car Dealer. 
Happy bHalcd llirthday Kevin. 
I hope you enjoy your rock. Den- 
nis M. 

WriKht Watchers Is JusI a grow 
misconception. 

C««t<y. I love your pom pons. 
Ken K. 

Joyce. You leave me up in the 
air. Flipped Out Dennis. 
CnrltNtnistH are sketchy charac- 
ters. 

PIlKrimM own a piece of the rock. 
There hi a movement on this cam- 
pus, meetings dally A373. 
Diane. I miss your body and 
want to see you this evening at 
my place at 10, bring your night- 
gown. nPM. 

The only gottd spade is a queen. 
People who smoke in bed, might 
wake up dead. 

The Voice is a tool of the Admin- 
istration. LRK. 



Correction 

The ' ' Paper Moon" ' review 
which appeared in the Sept. 
24 issue d The Harbinger 
was inadvertently reprinted 
without proper credit. 



■^ 



—- . -^r 



/ 



\ 



\ 



Page 8 



f€ 



^ 



H/I?BINGER 



i 



Tuition-free state college forseen 



Printed by permissioa of 
Paddock Publications 

A situation in which col- 
lege students would pay no 
tuition to attend state col- 
leges and universities, but 
would receive no scholar- 
ship help when attending pri- 
vate schools has been en- 
visioned by a committee at 
Southern Illinois University. 

The proposal to eliminate 
tuition at state schools was 
presented recenUy to a com- 
mittee at the Illinois Board 
of Higher Education which is 
studying s^ate tuition poli- 
cies The porposal, deve- 
loped by a committee of the 
Southern Illinois Universltv 



RESEARCH 



Thousands of Topics 
$2.75 per p«0e 
Send for your up todatt, I60^gt 
m«il order cjUlof EncloM $1 00 
to cover postJie (delivery tune n 
1 to 2 diys) 

RESEARCH ASSISTANCE. INC. 

11941 WIISHIRC BlVD . SUITE *2 
lOSAN(J£LtS.CAl(f 9002S 
(211) 4774M74 or 477 5493 

MMMItr 



board of trustees, "tries to 
bring up significant ques- 
tions" which the state should 
answer, according to James 
Brown, staff director for the 
SIU trustees. 

The committee's presen- 
tation to the state board has 
already drawn fire from of- 
ficials in private colleges 
and universities in the state. 
President J Roger Millerof 
Millikin University in De- 
catur said the proposal would 
jeopardize the state's pri- 
vate schools. 

Brown explained that the 
SIU report was not intended 
to suggest specific action to 
the state. Instead, he said, 
"We tried to bring up sig- 
nificant questions in the phil- 
osophy of tuition we think the 
state should deal with " 
brown said, "The basic 



question we feel should be 
answered is what understan- 
ding the state of Illinois 
should have about providing 
higher education." State 
support of private colleges, 
which includes direct pay- 
ments to shcools which have 
Illinois State Scholars in at- 
tendance. Brown said, "was 
started when there were too 
many students for state 
schools to accommodate." 

Now that the number of 
students attending colleges 
has peaked and is declining, 
Brown said. "We have the 
problem of whether we want 
to continue giving nwney to 
private schools when, at 
least In the short run. pu- 
blic schools can probably 
handle the load without 
paying anyone to help us " 

The SIU proposal is in 



marked contrast to a recent 
proposal from the Comm- 
ittee of Economic Develop- 
ment, a private national 
study group which suggests 
that tuition at state colleges 
and universities be in- 
creased drastically until 
students are paying nearly 
the full cost of their edu- 
cation 

The state board's tuition 
committee has said it will 
make a preliminary report 
in December. Brownsaidhe 
believes the SIU report will 
be considered and ' I m sure 
the state board will follow 
the course of looking at tui- 
tion from a fundamental, 
philosophical point of view " 



Music 




♦* 



mitrn'M 



Ty^Ti 



i\i 



In mMiieval Prance. werewolvM could be r«-hununii«d 
by being Uruek betVMn Ihe ey4* with ■ key. if anyone 
could get doae emwuli »o do U. 



(dlaesifirde 



'70 Capri - 

2300 cc \^6 rarln* enRlne 
four on the floor 
deluxe l-kirop«ui itylinic 
look* and runa Great! 
Good naa mileafte 
fl96a00orbc«loflcr. 
CaU 



TO GOOD HOMK 

9 month. oM female aamoyed 

AKC nt Xmn A w/ paper* 

and in the BEST of health. 

Good w/ diildKfi. 

Need* tomeone at home to 

take care of here. 

INqt IKK: After 6 p.m. 

Tuca. thru SaL 3a»4IS3 

STUDENTS TRANSFERRING 

to Northern Univcraity. 

t.lve off Campu* in a 

quiet, friertdly Frat. House 

January-May: $300.00 

Call (SI 5) 756-9625 or 

Viatl al 1030 HUlcrest, DeKalb. 



Raiae your Kradca, 
Reduce your itudy time. 
I>earn proper promounciallon 
of FreiKh and German. 
Quadra linKual European 
who studied at Serbonne of 
Paria, France will woric closely 
with you. Very reasonable. 
Call Tom Schreiner 773-0681 
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

New Furtniture For Sale 
Oriicinal 

OrlRinal 



Price AakinR 



S2.100. $1,300. 



300. 
200. 



Lowry Organ 

Theaierette 

King Size Red 

& Foot Rench 

( I)k, Gold X'elvet » 600. 

Rurnt OranKe Sofa 400. 

2 Chairs 

Dk. CK>ld Velvet I75.ea. ea.60 

2 CiKarette Tables 

Marble Tops & 

Gol^ Pedestals 175.ea. ea. 

1 L«mp -Tall 

(;old Cherub Rase 175. 

1 Lamp Table 



76. 



60 



Walnut 175. '76. 

Phone SaS-UaS. Ask for Monica. 

Combination Freeter RefriRerato.- 
Sears $75.00. CocMmII lnMe.end- 
aMe A table Teak $20 00. 
$15.00 A $5.00 respwti^-ety 
Ml -2037. 

ABORTION 
and planned parenthood info. 

FOR 
CHICAGO METROPOLITAN 
A R Fw\. CONA- E N I E N T N. W. 
SIDE I.fXATlON 

PRIVATE 

CONFIDENTIAL 

COUNSELING 

EXCELLENT AND 

COMPLETE FACILITIES 

licensed physicians 
prw;nancy testing 

WITH IMMF:DIATE RESULTS 

LOW COST 
312 772-1151 or 772-1152 

Work on campus in 
Community Relations Ofllce 
Typing A clerical duties 
16 18hr./wk. 
Contact Ruth Hisel 
Eat 266 Rm. A-323 

Wanted 

2 end tables and cocktail tables, 
dk. wood preferred, under $15e8C. 
CaU 397-3414 after 4:30 p.m. 



f 




vjy 



Writtng Instrumenn 
«\ Luifr»rt Chrome 

$ r>oc 
Stnnn 



S^Hff/NG 
JEWElEffS 

255 E. NW Hwy. 
Palatine. 111. 



(From page 9 ) 

try. There it aIbo music 
therapy, a relatively new 
field, and music therapists 
are uaed in special educa- 
tion, helping the mental- 
ly retarded and handicap- 
ped, those with learning 
'diflkulties and with psy- 
chological problems. 

Becoming a musician is 
not everyone's bag, how- 
ever, and for those who* 
enjoy listening rather than 
participating, Uie music de- 
partment does provide sev- 
eral concerts during the 
year as a form of cultur- 
al enrichment to the com- 
munity. Among these are 
renowned opera singer Phy- 
llis Curtin, who will present 
a concert Nov. 29th, the 
Ck>mmunity Orchestra Con- 
cert, coming up Dec. 3 un- 
der the direction of Dr. 
(leorge Mak&s, and the 
Community Chorus, direct- 
ed by Anthony Mostardo, i 
Dec. 4th, all at 8:00 p.m. 
in the Lounge. Admission 
is free. For more informa- 
tion, contact the music de- 
partment in Bldg. A. 



November 19 , 1973 



Nalional Guard 
reanher 



Bed. malress. 
Full size. $15. 



sprinRs. and frame. 
Call(M2-4718. 



HEATH KIT 

Vacuum tube, voltage meter 

FOR SALE. Model No. IM-28 

Cost in 1970 $72.60, 

Will sell for $50.00. 

Measures AC. DCT. DC-. & Ohms 

CaU Martin Fox at 428-M06 

(MUST sell need money) 

( Needs txibe for AC 

wlH pay the cost). 

1967 Honda "305" 
Hardly used. lOspeed 
Belgian Racer, Flaming red 
Gary Ext. 272 (after 12:00) 
or 272-4152 (.Sundays) 



mmp 




"The only 
authentic 
Gaelic Pub 
in the 
Suburbs! 



MONDAY NIGHT FUOTBAI.L- 

2.SC Beers AM. NIGHT 
BHKpipf Rand on Sunnav NITF 
Traditional Folk Mu«tc every night ekccpl M<»<| 



• AIR HOCKEY 

• FOOSBALL 

-•complete GAME ROOM 
DRINK 1/2 PRICE WITH .\n 
double DRINKS Sl.OCr 



358-8444 

55 N. Bothwell 
Palatine 



The Illinois National 
Guard, a reserve element 
of the United States Army, 
will be recruiting people to 
fill the ranks of their units. 
This recruiting will taice 
place on the 20th of this 
month in the Lounge of A 
building. 

While it is similar to the 
Army, in that you receive the 
same training, and wear the 
same uniforms it is totally 
different in the type of ob- 
ligation that the individual 
has after enlistment 

In the Army, one is re- 
quired to enlist for a number 
of years, as a full time em- 
ployee. In the National 
Guard, the individual, is re- 
quired only attendance at the 
drills, (an average of one 
week-end per month) and 
the 15 days of active duty in 
the summer. 

The National Guard, offers 
a choice in Job training in 
over 400 fields These are 
flekls that an individual can, 
for the most part, apply to 
his daily life 

Altho the money made per 
year, might seem small. It 
adds up, "The money that 
I make in the Guard, helps 
me pay for my insurance, 
and it is at this time, buy- 
ing my car." This quote is 
from a member of the Na- 
tional Guard, Larry Kiel._ 
The Guard is also open to 
females also. Through the 
programs, the Female re- 
cruit, can become a LPN. 
or expand in any number of 
other fiekls 

For the returning Vets, 
there is a Try One " pro- 
gram, which enables the Vet 
to enlist in the National 
Guard, at his old Army rank, 
and to earn extra nx>ney, 
while he decides if the Na- 
tional Guard is something 
that he can fit in his future 
This program, does not 
require the six year enlist- 
ment, but instead, as the 
name implies, lets him try 
the National Guard for one 
year 

A member of the Illinois 
National Guard, and one of 
the people who will be down 
at the recruiting station, 2nd 
Lt Jim Schultz expresses 
his comparison of the Guard 
to the Army as such, "In- 
terupt a semester, not your 
life." 




1 



November 19. 1973 



H 



H/4RBINGER 



Page 9 



C««wg offfffcflM 



New music wing 



By HEIDI JOHNSON 

Come second semester, the 
music department at Har- 
per hopes to be able to 
move out of the "bowling 
alley" and into its own 



plans for expanding the 
music program include a 
pep band, Community Jazz 
Band, and Class Voice. 
After transferring to a four 
year college, students who 
have majored in Music at 




The floor plan of the new muKic wing is designed for 
lockers. It to the only buikUng on campus which provides 
this service. 

building. The department is 
preacntly mislocated in an 
that was originally de- 
to be a bowling al- 
ley. This presented many 
problems, the biggest one 
probably being space. 

The new building wiUtake 
care of most of these prob- 
lems. It contains two large 
rehearsal rooms, one vo- 
cal and one instrumental, 
that may possibly be used 
for concerts. There will be 
fourteen individual prac- 
tice rooms, and an electron- 
ic music studio and an or- 
gan studio. 

The music division suite, 
for offices, will be located 
there, along with eight teach- 
ing studios, suitable for en- 
sembles or office space. 

The building will also con- 
tain three classrooms, a re- 
cording area, and it will be 
the first building at Harper 
to have lockers. These lock- 
ers are definitely needed, as 
they will be used for instru- 
ments. The building, being 
especially designed for 
music, should have few, if 
any problems with acous- 
tics, and should be good for 
recording. The new, better 
facilities should enable the 
music department at Harper 
to grow and expand its pro- 
gram. 

As it is now, students may 
become transfer music maj- 
ors in Applied or M^sic 
Education, or take certain 
music courses as a Hu- 
manities Course, or as an 
elective such as Fundamen- 
tals of Music Theory, Music 
Appreciation, Class paino. 
Class Guitar, Band, Cho- 
rus, Community Chorus, 
and Orchestra. Tentative 



Harper, are not limited to 
careers in performing and 
teaching. People are needed 
for publishing music and 
material, and in the manu- 
facture and selling of mus- 
ical instruments and acces- 
sories. There are oppor- 
tunities as tuner-technicians 
and conducting, either ama- 
teur or professional orches- 
tras, bands, choruses, and 
music librarians are need- 
ed in schools, colleges, and 
public libraries as well. 
Music specialists are need- 
ed for the television, radio, 
and motion picture indus- 

(Turn to page 8) 



PHOTO OF 
THEVy^EK 

This photo 

submiHod by 

Laurie Hammond 



For those students wishing early registration, they 
are reminded that they must see a counselor for 
course authorization to go through the computer 
terminals. Terminal times are as follows: 
Career programs: NOV. 29, 30, 9 A.M. - 12 , 



1 P.M. - 4 P.M. DEC. 7, 9 A.M. - 12, 1 P.M. - 

4 P.M. 

Transfer programs: DEC. 14, 9 A.M. - 12 P.M., 
1 P.M. - 4 P.M., JAN 11, 9 A.M. - 12, 1 P.M. 

- 4 P.M. 

Evening Students: JAN. 9, 5:30 P.M. - 8:30 P.M. 
Students are advised to check counselors sched- 
ules NOW ! ! ! 





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page 10 



TE 



H/RBINGER 



November 19. 1973 




November 19. 1973 



T€ 



H/I^NGER 



Food Service employees Ai Majkrzak, Fez Banani and 
Vlnce Morelli, make up part of the team of students who 
run the night shift in the cafeteria. 

Photo by Ken Kassam 



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Cafeteria offers eye to the future 



By 

DIANE DiBARTOLOMEO 

On the job training pro- 
vides students wih an in- 
sight to their future career, 
is the case as seen with food 
service students as they gain 
first hand experience 
through their jobs in Har- 
per's cafeteria. 

Since the faU of '71, the 
cafeteria has been complete- 
ly run from 3 p.m. on by 
Harper students. Most of 
whom are enrolled in the 
Food Service Management 
Career Program. 

The time put In is five 
and a half hours a day 
for a total of 22 hours 
a week. The job is thought 
invaluable to these stu- 
dents, who view it as a 
stepping stone to further 
their career. 

Randall A. Tendering 
who holds the top position as 
Night Supervisor views his 
job as an opportunity. Ran- 
dy likes the idea of respon- 
sibility on the part of the 
students. "Students are now 
operating on a higher scale 



of responsibility, than would 
otherwise not be available 
through other institutions,*' 
said Randy. Right now Ran- 
dy is enrolled in the Food 
Service Program and has 
future plans of opening his 
own Dinner Theatre. 

A foreign exchange student 
is among the night shift team. 
Fez Banani, from Pakistan 
likes the Idea of working 
within those ofhls age group. 
Fez would like to see more 
oriental dishes served In the 
cafeteria. By working In the 
cafeteria as a cook, Fez Is 
now able to support himself. 

Another fellow cook, Vlnce 
Morelli is a high school 
student enrolled In a Work 
Experience Program at 
Fremd. Through the pro- 
gram he receives credits 
for on the job training. 

Assistant Supervisor, Al 
Majkrzak someday would 
like to open a family style 
restaurant after completing 
his Food Service Program. 
Right now, Al is putting his 
training to work by cooking 
at home for his family. 

The cafeteria's oldest vet- 
eran of four years is Jes- 
sica Stanczak. -lesslca enjoys 



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her position as cashier 
mainly because of the atmos- 
phere and the opportunity 
of meeting people. She also 
finds the location of having 
her job at Harper most 
beneficial in saving on gas. 
Victor Cabers also enroll- 
ed In the Food Service Pro- 
gram is now teaching a 
Mini-course at Barrlngton 
High School In cooking. The 
course Is both lecture and 
lab, and the class size is 
about 30. Victor also men- 
tioned that he can now trade 
off with his roommate In 
preparing meals. 

Unlike most involved in 
the Food Service Program, 
Sue Oravec is enrolled in 
the Dietetic Technician Pro- 
gram. Sue is the Cafeteria 
hostess and believes she 
can use her training In 
management for her career 
as a dietician. 

The night shift is consid- 
ered more of a service than 
a profit making centure. 
The ppportunlty gained 
working In the cafeteria by 
these Food Service students 
is Invaluable, In that they 
can carry it wltfef them to 
their future career. 




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VWHCM: Horper College, music machine grows 



By MARY BETH CHI8TY 

WHCM, Harper CoUege 
Music Machine, has been 
bringing great sounds to our 
ears since 1971. That's 
right- Harper's own radio 
station, a closed ' circuit 
broadcasting system, has 
been operating daily since 
February 25, 1971, after the 
Student Senate gave its ap- 
proval to the non-profit, vol- 
unteer organization. 

During W H CM s first year, 
a small, ill-equipped office, 
consisted of— a cloth curtain 
separating the office from the 
studio, the control console, 
amplifier, turntable, and 
other broadcasting para- 



phernalia were inexpensive, 
homemade, and unpredict- 
able, according to Robert 
Yeoman, Station Manager. 

In December 1971, a fund 
from Student Activities, $10,- 
000, went towards a com- 
plete remodeling and re- 
building of the station. 
Which consisted of "two 
soundproof rooms, new 
professional broadcasting 
equipment - Included are 
two turntables, a pair of 
cartridge machines, two 
reel to reel tape recorders, 
and multiple input con- 
trol console." 

In addition, a United Press 
Internation News teletype in- 
forms the News Department 




Ron Anderson, head engineer-for WHCM. operates audio 
coHHole. Photo by Ken Kiaaam 

WHO CARES? 



BY GREG WALLIS 

The Program Board came 
through again, folks. The 
concert-dance with Colours 
was, in my opinion, the best 
showing d talent that Har- 
per has seen this year. The 
music was great; their har- 
monies were infal liable; the 
attendance reeked 

I pride myself in having 
seen most every progres- 
sive and country- rock group, 
to make it big in the past 
four years. The Demrer 
based group, Colours, put on 
one of the best shows I've 
seen Their use of acoustic 
guitars and the lack of a 
drummer was a very plea- 
sant change 

The group consists of four 
men: John Cable on lead 
guitar, Gordon Parrlsh on 
pedal steel, acoustic guitar, 
and electric bass. Jim Ratts 
on acoustic guitar and Mark 
Parker on stand up acoustic 
bass and cello. John does 
most of the lead vocal work 
with Gordon and Jim blend- 
ing in on their beautiful har- 
monies The majority of 
their material is original, 
with everyone contributing 
equally The tunes which 
aren't theirs belongto either 
friends of friends of friends, 
like Stephen Stills and Mi- 
chael Murphy. 

Their stage act was great 
Nothing fancy, just lots of 



good vibes and some easy 
going humor They talked to 
the audience (all 73 of them) 
and made them feel like par- 
ticipants instead of things 
The togetherness and Rocky 
Mountain -easy going nature 
of these four Denver lads 
(five counting their knowled- 
gable sound man -road mgr) 
made the Earl Scruggs Re- 
view look like a formation 
of brick walls. 

To sum things up, I know 
it's useless to be sarcastic 
and tell you what I thought 
of the disgusting turn out. 
because you don't really 
care, do you? All I can say 
is that some 12.900 of you 
students missed one of the 
best concerts this school has 
ever had 



with up-to-date news reports 
as well as sports and weath- 
er. And a radio receiver al- 
lows current weather re- 
ports from the National 
Weather Service. 

WHCM is aired five days 
a week, Monday through 
Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 
p.m. Music selection is done 
by the Music Director - Greg 
Wallia, whete bi-weekly 
a play list is fathered from 
old, new, and current al- 
bums (90-160 albums) as 
well as individual songs. 

The music machine DJs 
are— 
MWF 

8-10 
10-12 
12- 2 

2- 4 

4-6:30 
6:30-8 

8-10 
TR 

8-10 
TlO-12 
KlO-12 
12- 2 

2 - 5 

5 - 8 

8-10 
The Man 



Bill Pape 

Nancy Allinger 

Joe Jasen 

JefT Sail as 

Clarke Sanders 

J.J. Javers 

Don F'eterson 

Bob Yeoman 

E. K. Cinnott 

Jim Cardinald 

Jeff Boarini 

Greg Roberts 

Steve Deno 

Brad Hamma 

agement Staff is— 



Station Manager - 

Bob Yeoman 
Program Director - 

Joe Jaduto 
Head Engineer - 

Ron Anderson 
Marketing Manager - 

Greg Roberts 
Those belonging to the 
Administrative Staff are- 
News Director - 

K. Scjreiner 
Music Director - 

Greg WalUs 
Production Direcotr - 

Steve Deno 
WHCM is Installing a Au- 

ATTENTION GIRLS! 

Anyone and everyone in- 
terested in forming a Har 
per College Women's Com 
petitive Swim Team please 
sign up in the P E Office, 
or contact Bill Swanson, or 
Pattl Rothwell No exper- 
ience necessary -GET IN- 
VOLVED AND DO YOUR 
THING! 



INTRAMURALS 

- FOR YOU - 
Leagues are now being formed in: 

BASKiTBAU 

WOMEN Tues, Nov 13 MEN 
12:00 2:00 p.m. 



Thurs, Nov 15 
12:00 - 2:00 p.m 



BOWLING 

MIXED • Tuesdays, 1 2:00 - 1 :00 p.m. 
Hoffman Lanes 

All of you are invited to sign up today in 
Room F-345 or contact Coach Kearns. 



dio- Visual link, meaning the 
station will be heard all over 
campus over the instruction 
TV channels, most likely Ch. 



12 or 13. Hopefully, things 
wUl begin rolling Jan. 1, 
1974, just as soon as the 
new cables are installed. 



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page 12 



"H/RBINGER 



November 19, 1973 




Hawks football wrap-up 



Frank Alford chasing down JoliH pass. 

Photo by Chuck Zemeske 




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First we rtever high pressure. We 

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The.^awk football team 
posted Ui^ close of its first 
winning season this year, 
with a record of 5-4. 

After winning their first 
two games against College 
of DuPage and Kennedy 
King, the Hawks fell in two 
straight games to the num- 
ber one ranked junior col- 
lege team in the nation, Iowa 
Central, and then to the num- 
ber one ranked team in the 
state. Rock Valley. 

The Hawlcs also fell prey 
to Illinois Valley, and Tri- 
ton. 

This season's record was 
better than the last two teams 
that Harper had fielded in 
the short history of football 
at Harper. 

The offensive squad came 
around this year, averag- 
ing 3.3 touchdowns per 
game, and outscored their 
opponents 215 to 155. 
Three Hawlcs rushed for 
better than 250 yards this 
season, with Marty Wil- 
liams as team leader at 
500 yards in 87 carries, 
for a 5.7 average. 

Steve Francovic, gained 
280 yards in 57 carries, 
and Mike Kinney running 
65 times for a total of 259 
yards. 



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The Hawks quarterbacks 
threw for over 900 yards, 
with Pat Etempsey throwing 
for 700 of those yards, and 
7 of the team's 9 inter- 
ceptions. 

Ervin Kimbrough pulled 
in 29 passes for a total of 
457 yards. He was also the 
team's leading scorer, with 
50 points. 

Williams, and Francovic 
both scored 30 points to- 
wards the Hawk season, 
with place kicker Kevin 
Wilson kteking for 29 points. 

I 

The total loss margin tor 
the four games that they 
lost, was only 22 points. 
HARPER COLLEGE 
FINAL STATISTICS 
Individual Scoring 
Kimbrough 50 

Williams, M. 30 

F'rancovic 30 

Cn$s C§9afry 



WUson 

Kinney 

Williams, 

Lio 

Lepardo 

E>empsey 

Calahan 

Schmur stein 

Brady 

Katzer 

Healy 

Wozniak 



Mayo 



29 

18 

12 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

2 

2 



TEAM STATISTICS 
The first group of num- 
bers belong to Harper; the 







second group of points be- 
long to their opponents: 

H O 
Total Yards 

gained 2452 2205 

Rushing 1506 1514 

Passing 946 691 

TOTAL 
First Downs 101 127 



DeLaBruere's best performance 



In his be^ performance 
of the year, Hawk nmner 
Mike DeLaBruere captured 
42 in the Junior College Ath- 
I«!tic Association Cross 




Hawk runner Mikr DeLa- 
Bruere runs in Nationals. 



Country Me«. held h\ Tal- 
lahissee. Florida 

^'DeLaBruere ran his fast- 
est four mile time of 19 38 
sprinting home to place out 
of the fieW of over 370 run- 
ners 

Teammate Tom Fath also 
put out his best performance 
this year with a clocking of 
20:19, and finishing 142 
Harpers third runner, John 
Jones, placed 217, with a 
time 21 28 

The meet was attendedby 
70 schools from 28 states, 
with Allegheny Community, 
College of Pennsylvania and 
Southwest Michigan taking 
the top honors, each with 72 
points 

DeLaBruere's time was 
only seven seconds off the 
course mark in a meet which 
saw the top forty runners 
break the old record 



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/ 



Harper welcomes 
new chief of security 



By DENNIS MURRAY 

Many of you probably 
wonder what Campus Secur- 
ity here at Harper does oth- 
er than issue parlcing ticlcets 
and direct traffic. I recently 
asked Mr. Gordon Wallace, 
riew chief of Security, the 
same question. 

He started off to say, 
"Campus safety is like an 
Iceberg and only the tip of 
it shows. "Wallace stated that 
other duties besides the two 
mentioned above are fire 
inspections and safety fea- 
tures, and the general assist- 
ing and helping where need- 
ed. 

Officers patrol the lots 



and help stalled cars with 
jumps or a can of gaso- 
line. Gordon says that he is 
more interested in the safety 
part of his work rather than 
the law enforcement side. 
His goal is to give the best 
possible service to the 
student 

The staff consists of eight 
full-timers, counting Wal- 
lace, and thirteen part-timers 
from the criminal justice and 
the fire prevention pro- 
grams. They have two 
squad cars and one three- 
wheel cushman, all three 
equipped with radios with 
their own frequency, local 
police frequencies, and state 
and couny frequencies. 
They also have a civil de- 



fense radio and are well 
stocked in theevent of an 
emergency. 

Full-time officers are qual- 
ified by state law. They went 
to the police training insti- 
tute at Urbana or Lyle, 
111 for a six week training 
program. Receiving in-ser- 
vice fire training, the of- 
flcers are well educated in 
the art of first aid. They are 
required to attend training 
meetings in different areas 
of public aid and to par- 
ticipate in them. They are 
trained to use an inhalator 
and have recently been to 
a seminar at Northwest 
Community Hospital in 

(Turn to page 10) 




Gordon Wallace, new seoirity chief, has a goal-to give 
the best possible service to students. 

(Photo by Chuck Zemeske) 



TE 



H/4RBINGER 



William Rainey Harper College. Algonquin and Roselle Roads. Palatine. Illinois 60067. 312-397-3000 



Vol. 7, No. // 



Harper takes measures 
to conserve on energy 



By DIANE DIBARTOLOMEO 

In view of the President's 
appeal to the nation to help 
conserve energy. Harper 
College is undertaking mea- 
sures to save on power, to 
•void a fuel crisis 

Mr Robert J Hughes. 
Director. Physical Plant 
has anticipated the problem 
since last April, as he took 
measures to lower thetem- 



Horbmger atttads 
k,f. t9iihreiiۤ 

BY DIANE DIBARTOLOMEO 

Four Harbinger staff 
members attended the Asso- 
ciated College Press Con- 
vention at the Palmer House 
in Chicago The conven- 
tion was held Nov. 1 through 
3 and college journalist par - 
3 and college journalists 
participated from all over 
the United States 

Seminars on various as- 
pects of publication were 
conducted in the field of jour- 
nalism, photography and ad- 
vertisement by profes- 
sionals. Rap Sessions fol- 
lowed, enabling students to 
discuss and exchange simi- 
liar problems. 



peratures. Alreacty the 
thermostates have been re- 
duced from seventy -four to 
sbcty eight 

Harper's problem is dec- 
iding what cutbacks to make 
to nchieve a balance between 
maintaining the safety of 
students and .conserving en- 
ergy 



Parking lot lights have 
been turned off after clos- 
ing hours and on weekends, 
along with all decorative 
lighUng 

A long range plan to 
change the power plant is 
being looked into by the 

(Turn to page 3) 




Dec. 3, 1973 



4irflifor Dr. Thomas Hams 
to lead T.A. workshop 



Reservations are being 
taken now for the Trans- 
actional Analysis workshlp 
to be held at Harper Col- 
lege January 18. 19 and 20. 

Dr Thomas Harris, au- 
thor of the best - selling book 
Im OK - You re OK will 
be among workshop leaders 
from Harris Institute 
of Transactional Analysis of 
Sacramento. California. 

Co-sponosred by Harper 
College Community Counse- 
ling lectures and demons- 
trations of theprinciplesand 
applications of Transac- 
tional Analysis. TA is the 
theory of interpersonal re- 
lationships orginated by the 
lage Dr Eric Berne who 
wrote 'Games People Play ' 
and "What Do You Say After 
You Say Hello •• 

Portions of the workshop 
will be directed to the ap- 
plication of Transactional 
Analysis business, counse- 
ling to marriage, and, family 
concerns 



Dr Harris will present 
material from his soon- to- 
be-published book. 'Staying 
OK 

The workshop schedule is 
from 7 30 pm to 9 30 p m 
Friday. January 18: 9 am 
to 9 p m Saturday. January 
19. 9 am to 5 30 p m and 
19; and 9 am . to 5:30 p m 
Sunday. January 20 

The fee for the Thomas 
Harris workshop is $38 per 
person Senior citizens, stu- 
dents, and spouses of full- 
fee participants pay $26 

Registrations are being 
taken by TA Associates. 
2175A South Tonne Road. Ar- 
lington Heights. Illinois 
60005 For more itiforma- 
tion. phone 439-4187 

TA Associates was formed 
in 1972 by three clergymen 
Interested in bringing the 
values of Transactional An- 
alysis to lay people who 
wished to learn more about 
themselves and more about 
meaningful relationships 
with one another. 



Under the lohg-range plan for the ptiy.skal pliMit, this 
boiler will become obsolete and a smaller unit opera- 
tive at at 20% less will replace it. 

(Photo by Chuck Zemeske) 



Counselin 


'g- 


whats 


in 


it 


for us? 


first 


of a 


foi 


iir part 


series 
















PP- 


2 



f"'. 



i- '• 




Page 2 



TC 



H/I?BINGER 



Dec. 3. 1973 





eries 



Thousands of Topics 
$2.75 per page 
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mail order utalof ErKlose $1 00 
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Counseling, Whats 
us? 

This is first of a four part 
series covering counseling 
at Harper. Harper Counse- 
ling Center offers multiple 
student services. 

The Student Counseling 
L'enter of Harper helps stu- 
dents identify themselves as 
individuals and assists inthe 
determining progress of 
their vocational develop- 
ment. This vocational deve- 
lopment is a process of per- 
sonal growth towards vocat- 
ional maturity. Here, this 
growth oiay be identified 
along a contlnum that en- 
compasses the early years of 
one's life. 

Each person must make an 



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^yAlu^igp^of what his best 
possiblities are for his 
training. He should ask 
"Who am I and what do I 
need to be happy?" When 
one can identify himself as 
an individual and knows 
where he is in his voca- 
tional development he is bet- 
ter equipped to make a de- 
cision as to a possible pro- 
fession. Many students are 
faced with making several 
important decisions during 
their education which has be- 
come one of the major pro- 
blems for the individual stu- 
dent. 

The counselors at Har- 
per offer opportunities to en- 
large the students perspec- 
tive and goals during the ra- 
pidly changing social condi- 
tions One condition being 
the fluctuating need for new 
approaches to problems A- 
nother is that higher educa- 
tion faces its strongest man- 
date to provide students with 
the intellectual and techno- 
logical resources need in the 
years ahead. 

The college student must 
make many important de- 

( Turn to page 9) 




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Senate speaks out 



BY ROBERT HAYHURST 

Since the Student Senate 
flrst started in the fall of 
'67 we have always estab- 
lished objectives in the past. 
Last year among other 
things was faculty evalua- 
tion, the Senate worked hard 
on it, and now with this 
year's Student, and Faculty 
Senates, it will soon be a 
reality. 

These are our objectives 
for this year. 

A. To give responsible rep- 
resentation to the student 
body. This will be accom- 
plished if: 

1. Qualified students are 
elected/ appointed to Sen- 
ate positions. 

2. The activities, views, 
and entire image of the 
Senate is communicated to 
the student body through 
its members and the Har- 
binger and radio station. 

3. Students are appointed 
to college committees 
where student representa- 
tion is required. 

4. The concerns of stu- 
dents are promptly acted 
upon and referred to the 
appropriate administra- 
tive oince(s) for action as 
required. 

5. The channels of com- 
munication between stu- 
dents, faculty, and admin- 
istration are utilized. 

B. To assist and uhify all 
student clubs and organiza- 
tions. This will be accom- 
plished by: 

1. Assisting in the forma- 
tion of clubs and organ- 
izations. 

2. Approving club consti- 
tutions. 

3. Appropriating conces- 
sions. 

4. Appropriating money 
to aid club and organiza- 
tion projects. 



C. To review and recom- 
mend changes in college 
policy. This will be accom- 
plished if: 

1. College policies direct- 
ly affecting students are 
reviewed by the Senate. 

2. Recommendations for 
new or revisions of exist- 
ing policies are referred 
to the appropriate admin- 
istrative offices for action. 

D.To secure and promote 
the rights and responsibil- 
ities of the student body. 
This will be accomplished 
by: 

1. Reviewing and making 
recommendations regard- 
ing the student conduct 
code and student conduct 
committee procedures to 
insure proper and fair 
hearings for students. 

E. To budget student ac- 
tivity fee funds. This will be 
accomplished if: 

1. The funds are budget- 
ed within institutional pro- 
cedures to provide for a 
variety of cultural, social, 
intramural, and intercol- 
legiate activities, and nec- 
essary support services. 

F. To review the present 
and future space utilization 
needs ai the student activ- 
ities area. This objective will 
be accomplished if: 

1. The Student Senate, 
Program Board, WHCM 
radio. Harbinger evaluate 
the space currently assign- 
ed to them and make a 
recommendation to the ad- 
ministration for future 
need- 

These objectives, even if 
some' of them are not ful- 
filled this year, next year's 
Senate can carry on the im- 
provement of our college. 
Because, after all, that is 
everyone's main goal. 



WIGS 

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EVER HEARD OF A TIDWHICH? 

W»ll, it's the kind of Sandwich our Chef was caught j 
|molung for himself when the boss wasn't looking! 

TRY IT IT TIDBITS RESTAURANT 

IN WOODFIELD — 

WAITRESSES NEEDED! 



Dec. 3. 1973 



T€ 



H>1?BINGER 



Page 3 



Students gain experience in'surgery 



By Dave Gordon 

In 1971, a survey was tak- 
en by Harper College to de- 
termine the needs, both im- 
mediate and long range, of 
hospitals and other health 
care institutions in the North- 
west metropolitan area. 

The results of this survey 
were processed and in the 
final tally it was found that 
the list of priorities was 
topped by a relatively un- 
known category in the health 
careers. The category was 
that of Operating Room 
Technician (CRT). 

Upon further study of the 
survey results, it was deter- 
mined that there would be an 
Immediate need for approxi- 
mately 70 trained ORTs to 
fill current vacancies. 

Despite the unfamiUarity 
of the general pubhc with the 
position of Operating Room 
Technician, the Job is not a 
new one, and many hospitals 
have had in-service training 
for ORTs since the end of 
World War II. The first tech- 
nicians came from the ranks 
of former Armed Forces 
corpsmen. These people re- 
ceived specialized training 
by hospital staffs to com- 
pliment their service taught 
medical skills. 

As hospitals and patient 
care, became more special- 
ized, a switch in the duties 
of staff nurses became nec- 
CMary. Surgical nurses du- 




ties had to be re-aHgned to 
meet the needs of a more 
technical environment, and 
it became evident that train- 
ed people would be needed 
to fill the void. 

In accordance with its 
policy of trying to provide 
trained people to fill the 
occupational needs of the 
communities that it serves 
and motivated by the afore- 
mentioned survey. Harper 
College established the Oper- 
ating Room Technician ca- 
reer program during the 
summer of 1972. 

To help insure the success 
of the program, and assure 
the quality of training pro- 
vided, Ms. Patricia Bourke 
was retained as its director. 
In addition to these duties, 
Ms. Bourke also serves as 
lead instructor. 

A surgical. nurse herself, 
the director holds a Bachelor 
of Science degree in nursing 
from Marquette University 



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and a M;S. from Northern 
Illinois' University. Working 
as a staff nurse, Ms. Bourke 
was actively involved in the 
educational training of 
practical nursing students 
before accepting her present 
position here at Harper. 

The program itself is de- 
signed to meet strict stand- 
ards of education and con- 
duct. One full year in length, 
the course of study includes 
in-depth training in such 
fields an anatomy, physiol- 
ogy, medical terminology, 
principles and accepted 
practices of sterile technique, 
basic knowledge of operative 
procedures and anesthetic 
agents, and general patient 



care; both pre-op>erative and 
post-operative. 

Couple these academic re- 
quirements with actual clin- 
ical training at Northwest 
Community Hospital, Alex- 
ian Brothers Medical Center 
and Sherman Hobpital and 
it becomes quite evident that 
the ORT student has a very 
full, extremely demanding 
schedule. 

Ms. Bourke pointed to the 
fact that the future for train- 
ed people in this field is ex- 
tremely good. She proudly 
stated that eight of last year's 
eleven graduates are pres- 
ently employed as techni- 
cians by area hospitals. 

What happened to the other 
three? Two are continuing 
their education with nursing 
as their ultimate goal while 
the other is in training to be- 
come a physical therapist. 

Requirements for accept- 
ance into the program are a 
high school diploma, satis- 
factory scores on the GATB 
manual dexterity test, and 
proper mental atiitude, deter- 
mined by Ms. Bourke dur- 
ing a personal interview. 
Clinical limitations dictate 
that only seventeen people 



can be admitied to the pro- 
gram each year, so positions 
in this area are highly com- 
peted for. 

For anyone interested in 
an exciting, rewarding, dif- 
ferent career, the Operating 
Room Technicians Job could 
be just the right choice. But, 
as Ms. Bourke was quick to 
point out, it isn't easy. 



Energy 

(From page 1) 

architectual firm. Claudell. 
Rowellett and Scott. The 
possibility at installing a 
small unattended boiler is 
presenting in the plan It is 
estimated by Hughes, that 
the boiler would operate at 20 
percent of the energy 
consimed by the larger boil- 
ers. Although it would take 
four years to pay for the 
addition, it would be a wise 
investment in the long run. 
as it would be saving some 
twenty thousand dollars a 
year claimed Hughes. 



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T€ 



H/1RBINGER 



Dec. 3, 1973 



oupur- 



» ^ 



STAFF HELP WANTED 

The Harbinger is looking for those people who are 
looking for that inside view. We can offer you a well 
rewarding Job on our staff. Your benefits can vary 
upon your imagination and ambition. We can make 
available tuition rebates plus travel opportunities. If you 
like to write, we will make you a writer, if you like 
taking pictures, you will be a photographer. All yoii 
have to do is walk into our Harbinger ofRce A367 
or call 397-3000. ext. 272. 



INPUT 



Harper elections: 
study in futility 

This week the Student Senate will t>e 
accepting petitions of candidates for the 
position of a student represenative to serve 
on the Board of Education. Following the 
tradition of Harper elections, this one will 
succeed in not disrupting the student body. 
Why is this such a common occurance? 
Harper students avoid the polls for the, 
simple fact that they are ignorant of what' 
is exactly going on. One would not 

like to walk in blind into a situation where 
decision can make a difference. Such 
goes the phrase, tn'and names must l>e 
associated with what they can do before 
there is any purpose in making a pur- 
chase. 

Now. what can be done to rid this 
evil omen afflicted upon Harper elections? 
The Harbinger proposes that the election 
committee establish an open forum for all 
candklates to be introduced to the student 
body This would t>oth benefit the voter 
and the cndklste, by bringing them on a 
closer level of communication. Arousing 
student awareness in their government 
will result in a greater Interest among 
all. and consequently, voter turn - out 
at the polls will Increase 

Past elections have entailed little effort 
In campaigning for the candidate Ac 
tually the only mandatory rule set down 
is for the candidate to file a petition of 
100 signatures Why was it that, in the 
October senator election, ou of the nine- 
teen sentors who filed a petition ( a 
total of 1.900 signatures) only 254 ballots 
were cast? It seems that the campaign- 
ing when left up to the candklates. fails 
and defeats the purpose A total of 100 
signatures in one senators words, only 
took a quick 40 minutes to complete 
And when the Harbinger asked for a 
statement from the candidates, mind you 
for their benefit, we found It quite ag- 
gravating to hunt them down 

Of course we cant overlook the fact 
that alot of hard and tedious effort was 
put into the publicity of the campaign 
by marQT individual senators, especially 
those colorful poaters and flyers, which 
read "VOTE FOR ME," but overlooked 
the importance of posting election place 
and time and a much needed biography 
of thecandklate. 

What good is it? As a matter of fact 
It isn't I've yet to see a candidate, 
on his own. go up to a crowd and ac- 
tually campaign and sell himself! Part 
of the workings behind politics is learning 
by experience, the techniques of selling 
ones ideas. 

The endorsement of an open forum is 
badly needed. If enforcement by the elec- 
tion committee is what it's going to take 
to move candidates into the public eye 
lets "DOIT. " 




OgaM»ta hiHiMAif 



Heating wlbacks boost sweater indostry 



Reliable and usually high 
White House sources re- 
leased to us an exclusive 
rundown of the President's 
timetable for the energy 
criaia. and comprehen- 
sive economic package com- 
bined. 

This new program, in- 
stituted by high campaign 
spending by the oil com- 
panies, created the need for 
a shortage in the oil in- 
dustry. This was easily done 
through the office of the 
President, and by various 
acts of congress 

We are all aware of the 
present oil situation, how the 
country is allegedly at a loss 
for oil si«)plies. and how this 
effects the sipply of heating 
oil The other oil products 
were inchjded as part of the 
cover, as we all know that 
there cannot be a shortage in 
heating oil, when there is 
plenty of gasoline around 
By creating this short- 
age, the President has allow- 
ed the oil industry to charge 
a higher price for their 
product, and increase cor- 
porate profits This pus 
more money Into the econ- 
omy, and is in direct rela 
tlon to the President's past 
economic policies - ie take 
the money from the indiv- 
idual, and give it to the 
corporation 

This part of the package 
secretly refered toasphase 
6, or how I learned to get 
high on gas, act 1 

When the public believes 
that there is a legitimate 
shortage of petrollum, then 
phase 6. act 2 begins. 

Under this program, those 
people who have lost their 
jobs due to the fact that gas 
stations hav^ closed down, 
oil refineries have laid off 
people and the transporta- 
tion industries have fallen a - 
part, will be retrained, and 
inserted into new positions 
In the economy. 

This sipposed fuel short- 
age, (the lack of heating oil) 



will cause the people to wear 
sweaters. This will create 
an increase in the sweater 
industry, and textile indus- 
try will have a boom like it 
never saw before. 

The gas and oil companies 
are still making a good 
profit, so they are skill ok 

The field of medical ser- 
vTce will need more help, as 
more andmorepeoplewillbe 
under the weather, and in 
need of professional care. 

This increaae in medical 
personel will be takenxare 
of by the people in the 
automotive mechanics in- 
dustry who are out of work 

After a short period of 
training, these ex- mech- 
anics, would become lic- 
enced physicians This may 



seem a little far fetched, 
but everyone wjjo knows, can 
tell you that there is little 
difference between a car- 
buretor and a throat, and 
there is little difference bet- 
ween a heart, and a fuel 
pump Those people in the 
Front End business will be- 
come neurosirgeons. 

A brain surgeon makes 
more money than a mechan- 
ic does, so there again, there 
is more money in the econ- 
omy. Not to mention the 
fact that this will help alle- 
viate the doctor shortage. 

Thus, the President not on- 
ly makes the big companies 
happy, but helps buUd this 
country into the America 
that Nixon dreams of. 




T€ 



Hy^RBINGER H 



F^ditor-ln-chlef 
Managing Editor 
Business Manager 
N'ews F'.ditor 
Activities Manager 
Cartoon Eklitor 
Photo Editor 
I'hotographeril 



5V 

Diane DiBartolomeo 

L. R. Kiel 

Gary Zdeb 

Mary Beth Christy 

Heidi Johnson 

Dennis Murray 

Chuck Zemeske 

Greg Conway, Paul Cord, Ken 

Kissam, and Mike Wellman 



Contributing Staff 

Dave Gordon, Sue Pollack, Steve 
Schlosser, Bill Whitehead, Rich Kusnierek, Joyce Tarwid, 

Advisor 
Mr. Sturdevant 

The JIARBINGEH is the student publication for the 
Harper College campus community, published weekly 
except during holidays and mid-terms. All opinions ex- 
pressed on the editorial page or in the columns arc 
those of the writer, and are not necessarily those of the 
college, its administration, faculty or student body. 
For information on advertising, rates and publica- 
tion schedule, call or write Harbinger Business Of- 
fice. 

William Hainey Harper College, /Mgonquin and 
Uoselle Kds., Palatine. Illinois 60067. Phone num- 
ber 397-3000, ext. 272 and 460. 



Dec. 3, 1973 



T€ 



H/«eiNGER 



<im 




During a recent visit to one 
of my favorite establish- 
ments specializing in the dis- 
bursement of spirits and 
other intoxicants it sudden- 
ly occured to me that we 
have been had. 

* mean, here we are in the 
meddle of the Sexual Revo- 
lution, and most of us haven't 
even been asked to give at 
the office. 

You laugh and snicker at 
this statement, but if you 
stop and think for a moment, 
have you been asked? If 
you have, good for you. but 
for most of us it seems that 
we have been divinely clas- 
sified 4-F. and for all intents 
and purposes unfit to parti- 
cipate in this great revolu- 
tion 

Perhaps its Just that we. 
you and I that is. are not 
quite suitable models for the 
revolution's advertising 

campaign, and therefore not 
quite suitable for the revo- 
lution. 

No man. or woman for that 
matter, is more responsible 
for bringing sex into the ave- 
rage American home than the 
inimitable Hugh M Hefner, 
Publisher of PLAYBOY ma- 
gazine. 

Hefner's claims of giving 
his nude models the "girl 
next-door " look must be 
looked at in realistic terms. 
Doesn't everybody have a 
perfect female living next 
door? Doesn't every girl 
between the ages of 18 and 
24 have a body free from 
blemishes, stretch marks, 
and the like? Ddesn t every 
girl on your block stand 5' 
5 ", weigh 120 poinds, and 
measure 36(c cup) -23 -35? 
These are all fantasies, 
of course, designed to excite 
the male libido, and make 
a better life for the girl that 
really does live next door 
Unfortunately, like most 
designs things don't always 
turn out the way that they 
are supposed to. 

First of all, women didn't 
want to be compared to the 
likes of PLAYBOY'S Play- 
mate, and secondly they felt 
cheated at not having their 
own 'sex object " maga- 
zines. 

To combat the first com- 
plaint, a few of the real girl 
next door types got together 
and organized the Woman's 
Liberation Movement, and in 
answer to the second comp- 
laint Helen Gurely B own 
paid Burt Reynolds to bare 
his necessities for all to see. 
These two actions brought us 
to where we now stand in 
the real sexual revolution. 
Most men are running all 
over their neighborhoods 
looking for women with mar- 
ble textured skin, overdeve- 
loped breasts, and under 
developed brains. 



At the same time, we have 
one group of women burning 
their bras, which gives the 
male an opportunity to gawk 
at something the braless 
wonders are saying he 
shouldn't be gawking at, and 
we have another group of wo- 
men nuining all over their 
neighborhoods looking for 
the man with a fore -arm 
just like Burt Reynolds'. 

Is it any wonder that none 
of us have been asked to join 
the great revolution? We 
are all too worried about 
plastic sensuality and not 
concerned at all with natural 
sexuality. 

Scholars 

"Are you a people per- 
son? If so, ten $3,000 scho- 
larships are offered for fu- 
ture librarians for 1974-75 
graduate study in library 
science Deadline for ap- 
plication is February 1, 
1974 For more information 
contact the Placement and 
Financial Aids office. Room 
A364" 



^Uiftfiex StlcufexA 




The Harper Studio Players 
will perform four once-act 
plays December 7 and 8 at 
8:00 P.M. in room E- 106 on 
the WUliam Rainey Harper 
campus. 

The Wonderful Ice Cream 
Suit, a comedy written by 
Ray Bradbury, is the story 
of a half-dozen Mexican- 
Americans who attempt to 
share a vanilla-white dress 
suit and the problems 'they 
encounter with such an ar- 
rangement. The play is di- 
rected by Bill Lindgren. 
Death Knocks and Count 
Dracula, comedies written 
by Woody Allen, are direct- 
ed by John Katovich. 

The Veldt is anothe play 
written by Ray Bradbury 
and is the story of a father 
who builds a magical play- 
room for his children. This 
play is directed by Rkk 
Aldana. 

Tide: The Wonderful Ice 

Cream Suit 

Author: Ray Bradbury 



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Director: BUI Lindgren 
Cast: Villanazul - Mike Ber- 
nard; Martinez-Chip Howes; 
Vamenos-Rick Aldana; Go- 
mez-John Cooper; Manulo- 
Dave Zandier; Dominguez- 
Bob Maidel; Mr. Shumway- 
Larry Andres; Leo- Vicki Lu- 
cas; Ladtes Voices- Vickl Lu- 
cas & Amparo Santacruz; 
Young Woman (Celia Obre- 
gon)-Vocki Lucas; Ruby Es- 
cuadrillo - Smparo Santa- 
cruz; Toro Ruiz-Larry An- 
dreas. 

TlUe: The Veldt 
Author: Ray Bradbury 
Director: Rick Aldana 
Cast: George Hadley -Scott 
Elliottv Lydia Hadley- Nan- 
cy Wijlard; Peter Hadley- 
Rick AWana; Wendy Had- 
ley - Shari Mitchell; David 
Maclean-Bill Lindgren; The 
mechanic - Ron Kapson. 

Title: Count Draqrula 
Authorr Woody Allen 
Director: John Katovich 
Cast: Count Dracula - Rick 
Aldana; Baker-Chip Howes; 
Baker's Wife-AmparoSanta- 
cru«; Mayor - Mike Bernard; 
Mayor's Wife-Lori South. 



Page 5 



Tide: Death Knocks 
Author: Woody Allen 
Director: John Katovich 
Cast: Death - Roman Yew- 
chyn; Nat Ackerman -Lar- 
ry Andres. 

Admission is free with a 
current Harper l.D. card, 
and $1.00 for the publk. 

Further information can 
be obtained by calling 397- 
3000 and asking for exten- 
sion 448. 



ffptsfr/ts 



(From page 6) 

Amazingly Monte 11 has 
never used either a ruler of 
a compass The needle that 
he applies is an invention of 
the Mall Mai artisans 
Cotto/i and wool are brought 
from the highlands of Vene- 
zuela or from other neigh- 
boring countries 

The most aspiring work 
created by Monte 11 and his 
esalsunts is the suge cur- 
tain for the Fine Arts Thea- 
tre in Maracalbo. a woven 
mural measuring 50 by 22 
feet. 

The urrent exhibition of 
twenty -two tapestries was 
originally displayed at the 
Pan Amerlcn Union 




hff» KcynoM Rvviawt g>*« il to »ou ttrtight and f«tt S*H Tmi« Im 
rou Pinpcnt wfwr* ,rou riMd h«p m* moti iMd yoo ngM to lt>« 
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»v»n »h»%a-a* yov ttudy required bade court*t 
1 mator taitoooki Hatplul ouaationt attav top.c» 

aruS bib'tography 

Professional Education Series 

ri Th« tirjl Mri«« «o ratal* •Oucattonat 

1*1 • (<«pp*ning nam m *duc*l>on Now 

coy*rir>g mora than JO m»,o» loptct 

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Hy4?BiNGER 



Dec. 3, 1973 



Dec. 3. 1973 



T€ 



H/1R6INGER 



Page 7 



Jack - of - all - trades 



By MARY BETH CHRISTY Larry is completely in 

There are a lot of talented charge of the fine films seen 

people attending Harper in E 106. How does he 

One or these gifted indiv- select the films'' He doesn't 

Iduals is Larry Fredrich. A survey was taken laff year 

Film Chairoian of the Pro- among 600 people anywhere 

gram Board. on campus. And those 

movies that were voted most 
——^———^——— — — popular are new on schedule. 

IR rHFMISTS & The movies are popular 

jn. I.ni!.ini3i:3 a enough to bring at least 

JR. ENGINEERS 200 and over attendants 

T, ... ,, ui^ i.. Popular films such as Jan 

Position, available tn ^^ ^ ^^^,^^ Madness and 

-*'*""'* Teenage WerewoU - Feb 8- 

-PharmaceuUcala ^j^g,, . ^4^^ 1 - Play MIb- 

-Pooda ty For Me Mar 3 200 

—Polymers Motwls - Mar. 22 - Little 

and many other areas. Big Man. And the week. Dec. 
Chemical Search is an 3 through Dec 7, a double 
organization staffed* by feature program will be tele - 
young college educated vised on the TV in the fire- 
counselors to help recent place area in the lounge. 

technical graduates in J"**^"'"'"* *" *'?^^*!°!!:^- °|* 
♦k-i, ...r^k for ««h half hour comedy with Chick - 
their search for job ^ Li,ue #2 andonehalf hour 
opportunities. rock concert with B.S. I. T.. 
Our service is free and we j^ „^^ ^^ j^^^ Uiahna. 
have helped many Harper g^^,^ condnously thru- 
alumni. CaU ( 3 12 ) 345-6960 out the day 
g^. • 1 o I. Larry doebn't advertise 
Chemical ^earcll the conventional way Be 
1 127 S. Mannheim •»<le8 commercials on the 
Westchester. 111. 60153. »••<**«>• bulletin board, table- 
— — — — ^— tents, posters and banners. 



PUBLIC SESSIONS EVERY DAY 
Closi LeisoMi for all Agei 



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NORTH SUBURBAN AND CHICAGO ClINIC 



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Immadlotc Ratuitt 
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Larry used an old but notice- 
able way to advertise the 
films All day. Nov. 16. he 
wore a sandwich sign adver- 
tising Slaughterhouse 5, all 
day, everywhere. And how 
did it effect attendance? 
Great! " 

That is what Larry expects 
when he teaches mini- 
cours«s on Juggling. Yes. 
he's a juggler too. Clown 
outfit, grease paint, false 




Pictured above la Larry 
Fredrich, film chairman, 
juggler and local sandwich 
man. 

nose, the whole bit He Jug- 
gles at parties, shows. ev«i 
juggled on Harper CoUege 
On the Air. compliments to 
the Communications Depart- 
meM. He Juggles anything 
from pool balls to butcher 
icnifes. He can juggle an 
apple and two basketballs and 
eat the apple at the same 
time. Or he can do a basket- 
ball - petiny and a marsh - 
mallow at once. 

The dates for Basics of 
Juggling are not yet kni>wn. 
But the two day. two hour 
mini-course will be an- 
nounced in the Harbinger. 



•i( 



By DIANE DraARTOLOMEO 

Treasures from South 
America can be found in 
the Learning Resources 
Center here at Harper. Cur- 
rently on exhibit are Gua- 
jlro Tapestries from the 
Mali Mai workshop in Vene- 
zuela. 

Designer for the work 
shop. Lius Monte 11. whose 
weaving of small utilitarian 
items such as saddle blan- 
kets and bags was discov- 
ered several years ago by a 
representative of the Center 
of Fine Arts in Maracaibo. 
His tapestries emphasize 
colorful flowers, birds, the 
sun and stars as well as 
geometrical forms, which 
are all repreated in sym- 
metrical compositiotis. and 
are completed by other 
craftsmen working with him 
at Mali Mai. 

It's a colorful exhibition 
of folk art which should ap- 
peal to all people. 

(Turn to page 5) 



OFEl/TMS 



On Campus 

TV video featuring "Chicken Little" and 
"In Concert " with Doctor Hook. Blood 
Sweat and Tears. Dec. 3. 4, and 5 
at 12 - 1 p.m. at the fireplace in the 
lounge. 

Harper College Community Orchestra 
Concert, imder direction of Dr. George 
Makas. Dec 3. 8 p.m., Bldg. A. Lo- 
unge, free. 

Harper Studio Players present four one- 
act plays, Dec 7 & 8. E-106. free 
with Harper ID. 

Bill Qualeman Concert, Jan. 4 in the 
College Center Lounge. $1 with ID. 
See Student Activities for advance 
ticket sales. 

Campus Television (channel 6) features 
The Eurailpass Story: Too Much For 
Your Money* ' , about the advantages of 
train travel with a low - cost pass 
in Eurpose. Dec 4 4 5 "Hot Dog 
Skiing", highlights "hot dog" skiing - 
the crazy kind of skiing that has be- 
come the rage, Dec. 11 & 12. 

Harper College Band & Choir Concert, 
Dec. 11, 8 p.m., Lounge. 
Music- 
Humble Pie. at the Amphithettre. Dec. 9 

"Celebrate the City ". drama, music & 
dance to benefit the Free Street Thea- 
tre Newbury Plaza. 1030 N Stale St. 
Free, but donations requested. 

Glen Campbell, at the Mill Run Theatre. 
Dec 6-9 Ph 298-2170 

Hermann Prey, world famous baritone, 
at the Auditorium Theatre, Dec. 9 
Ph 922-6634 

Handel's MESSIAH. Dec 18 L 19. Or- 
chestra Hall. 



A^{t 



BY RON ZOBERIS 

Where can you find a group 
of people, representing dif- 
ferent life styles and sharing 
a common concern for and 
vdth young people? Such a 
place can be sought at The 
Bridge. 

The Bridge is conunitted 
to acknowledging a person's 
dignity and human rights in 
an individual institutional 
and cultural growth. By un- 
derstanding and listening to 
young people this commit- 
ment is expressed in an at- 
mosphere of mutual trust. 
Within this trust many young 
people come to understand 
their inner feelings within 
the enviromem of their pri- 
vate society The Bridge 
offers these individuals a 
chance to discover and 
explore many alternatives 
toward developing their per- 
sonal potential growth. 

The Palatine Township 
Youth Committee founded the 
Bridge in September 1971 to 
help meet the needs of young 
people. Composed of a four- 
teen member staff. The 
Bridge serves as a leader 
in communications along 
with theTownshipofSchaum- 
burg. Elk Grove, Wheeling. 
Village of Hoffman EsUtes. 
Arlington Heights and the 
Cook County Deaprtment of 
Health. These communities 



in know- 
cultivate 
confused 
well re- 



assist in offering aid in the 
financial requirements The 
major funding is through the 
Township of Palatine. 

All of the members of The 
Bridge are well qualified in 
helping those who reach out 
to them for advice or coun- 
seling. Bob Draft, who is an 
outstanding member, is a 
prime example of the 
Bridges interests He finds 
great gratification 
ing he is able to 
a troubled and 
young adult into a 
spected way of life. Bob 
along with the other mem- 
bers aid in the counseling 
and advice to 

those problems that may deal 
with family, drugs, sex and 
social to those problems re- 
lated to school, pregnancy 
or medical. Also one of their 
leading activltes is for the 
members of the Bridge to 
go into the community to 
places where young people 
gather to offer help. Along 
with the cooperation of some 
school officials, they also go 
into high schools and serve as 
"ombudsmen" or do indivi- 
dual or group counseling. 

The Bridge is located at 
434-1/2 East Northwest 
Highway in Palatine. Any- 
one wishing to contact the 
Bridge may call 358<talk)- 
8255 and ask for Bob. 



HARBINGER FOiLIES 








'Ctllm*. 
OtdMan: 



U^ « a trip 
an m puUic bu; 
drtvan bu a 



PranWIy^ iW 
ov«rdu« Vor 

a ow.i r 



Tell 
OidMari: 
A>hat 
« tha 
fVM idanc^? 



T»i« Pt»«id«ncy 
tt anft-gsar trip 
on a cri«rter0d 
t)u«, driven bg 

a mortal 
calted Nixon. 



Th« thing i«,he 
of t*i«fouc. 




M/EEKIN 

DBrORTION 

Holding up the rent 

A 13 - year - old boy confessed to a 
series of holdups to pay for a luxury 
apartment and to set up a prostitute 
working for him and his gang bang, police 
said. 

Queen David 

David Mosher of the University of Cali- 
fornia at Davis was named homecoming 
queen over the weekend. The bearded 
20 year -old Oakland resident received 
781 votes to 120 for the runner-up He 
says he ran as a protest candidate. 

Gets what he paid for 

Prince Minister Pierre Elliott Tru- 
deau's old Cadillac Limousine was auc- 
tioned for $3,600 about $16,400 less than, 
it cost 68,000 miles ago when it was* 
new. After the sale, the car would not 
start. The battery was dead. 



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personals 



Happy Birthday i'lieti'. How du«* 
It feel lu be a virgin at 17 and 
have not yet reached puberty? 
Dennia, last night I will always 
remember, but could you please 
return my ni,ie? 

Gate here's your chance! CaU 
Konnie for the perfect date at 
381 3643. 

Sandra Lee you're sagging. 
Ron i.' hip on Intercourse of the 
mind. 

KJ. had a good Ume! B.H . 
Wlah to tilaiik St. Jude for aer- 
vies rendered. P.B. 
Give Ireland back to the Irish. 
J.U 

Give Naapvr back to the N'agpur- 
ese. L.R.K. 

I rcsrtt that I have only one coun- 
try to give to my life. R-M. \. 
J.A. happy belated birthday! Hope 
to sec you soon! R. H. 
I wlah to announce nothing at this 
time. Kalph 

ThaCs OK Kalph. you got nothing 
worth listening to. B.J. 
8k L. Sloaa. You sttU owe me a dale 
How come you haven't made ar- 
rangements yet? L..RK. 
Por a good Haw. call DIncy at 
George's Place. 

Back Door Beauty is really a race 
horse l)r Oonto. 
To llw high school sladctila who 
wtlneascd a suicide, now you know 
what drugs do to your mind. 
■catralal to a aim MIm word. 
OLD. Thto la wmpoart to be an 
uncenaorcd new^taper. how come 
you wouldn't let me run the last 
personal. 

Praali. We like your style. The Boys 
Acroas the Hall. 

To Ike good loolilng girl that al 
ways wears a dress, and slls In 
the lounge from 10 a.m. to nooo, 
I am in love with you. please eoi»- 
tact me You will know me be- 
cause I am the only one drooling. 
Rick. I hope that theinakrdoca- 
n't rind out about the evening of 
Ibc 2«1h. I would not want to be 
rcaponslbic for your marriage 
problems, I.RK. 

B yoa don't iMg off I will per- 
sonally total you and your ofOet 
you gaseronious exhaust. 
I dig your mind. I dlR what you 
say, I dig your talents, but I can't 
stand your body. MBC. 
g|»c«dy. I will never forget what 
happened Thanksgiving I will 
name If after you. Carol. 
A man was seen In the woman's 
washroom on the 28th of last 
month. Will he please return* 
a* he forgot his coat. Tex. 
Any iienion who feels It In hto 
soufd to work for this illustrious 
staff, should contact Larry Kiel 
in the Harbinger Office. A367 
The only good thing about Hobby 
Douglass is that if he died hi* hair 
black, grew a moustache, smoked 
a cigar, had bushy eyebrows, and 
wore glasses, he wouW lot>k like 
f'.roucho Marx. 




1 ' 



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Page 8 



T€ 



H>RBINGER 



Dec. 3, 1973 



Dec. 3. 1973 



T€ 



H/4RBINGER 



Page 9 



PIONEER 



PE KLH 



PIONEER'S SX 525 is a medium powered, low priced fi^tffTM solid state stereo 
Receiver with advanced circuitry and a sensitive tuner section. The power output of 
the SX 525 (52 watts of continuous power) is adequate to fill the average size living 
room with virtually undistorted sound. This versatile Receiver also features two 
tape monitor circu^s which enable you to record on two tape recorders 
simultaneously. 

The PE 3012 automatic turntable incorporates an array of features not available in 
any other turntable at or near its price of $99 95 For music lovers, it allows even 
the most modest of compotieni s /stems to include a fine turntable instead of an 
ordinary record changer. Some of the features of the 3012 include variable pitch 
control, a viscous damped cue-control as welt as PE's exclusive "fail-safe" feature 
that prevents the tonearm from descending to the platter unless a record is on it. 
The turntable package in this system includes base, dust cover and STANTON 500E 
Broadcast Standard cartridge 

The KLH 32 is the first moderately priced loudspeaker system to provide the level 
of performance and the characteristics of expensive loudspeaker systems Its flat 
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relationship to far more costly KLH loudspeakers 

Total of individual component list prices $530.80 
Complete System Price. */[00^® 







MARANTZ DUAL CERWIIM-VEGA 





Th« MARANTZ 2220 AM/FM Stereo Receiver is one of the most versatile 
Receivers in the $300 price class. Its performance clearly dennonstrates an ability to 
deliver the cleanest sound possible with a minimum amount of distort|{yj,^he 
Marantz 2220 also incorporates all of the basic features necessary to satisfy those 
M«kir>g the highest level of performance in the $400 to $600 system price range. 

The DUAL 1214 Automatic Turntable operates with the same ease and 
convenience as the more expensive Dual turntables Aside from having fewer 
features the 1214 is made to the same high standards of precision and reliability 
The tor>earm can track flawlessly at one gram. The turntable package in this system 
comes complete with base, dust cover, and STANTON 500EE Broadcast Standard 
cartridge 

The CERWIN VEGA MODEL 24's are 12" two way speaker systems housed in 
oiled walnut enclosures These speaker systems are efficient enough to permit an 
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Total of individual component list prices $684.80 



Complete System Price. 



m 



HI Fl HUTCH SPECIAL OFFERS! 
GOOD THRU DECEMBER 24, 1973 



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KLH Model 17 10 two way 
KLH Model 6V 12" two way 

STEREO CARTRIDGES 

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Lo IRo KEEL 



Singles bars have to be 
the biggest rip-off that I have 
ever seen. While most of them 
claim to be a good place to 
drink, they are in reality a 
good place for the owners to 
make monev 

While they appeal to the 
younger drinkers, their 
prices are more along the 
lines of the olderpeople who 
have more money than they 
know what to do with. Prices 
are high, and adding insult 
to the integrity of the custo- 
mer. Most of the time they 
throw a cover charge in 
your face before you even get 
close enough to the bar to 
smell the corks. 

Over the Thanksgiving Va- 
cation I had the opportunity 
to frequent a rather large 
number of these establish- 
ments, and found that the art 
of subtle highway robbery is 
still as active as it was in 
the old days. "^ 

Being one who does not 
have all that much money to 
throw into someone's private 
coffers, we were scared 
away from most ci the est- 
ablishments, when we hit the 
door. 

At the Nickle Bag in Schil- 
ler Park, they we re charging 
a dollar for admission and 
the space available to stand 
was eqtMl to the surface area 
of a postage stamp 

Butch McGulres in Mount 
Prospect was worse Added 
to the fact of no room to 
raise your elbow to get the 
glass to your lips, there was 
the fact that the ceiling 
dangles a few inches from 
your head, and all the smoke. 
body odor, vid essence de 
bathroom, collected about at 
the level of my nose, making 



any thoughts of further 
drinking impossible. 

At Haymakers, where the 
space available was even 
more confining, and the at- 
mosphere brought back 
memories of the high school 
locker room after a week 
without cleaning, there was 
too much noise. 

When I go to drink, I like 
a large amount of peace and 
quiet. A place where I 
can sit down and have a few 
drinks, and not worry about 
running out of money before 
I run out of thurst. 

Perhaps this is due to the 
fact that I have become 
rather attached to a place 
where I can sit down, order 
a mixe<) drink, hand the bar- 
teiKler a dollar bill, and ex- 
pect some change. Maybe 
it is the fact that I think 
that the function of singles 
bars, is like that of the bor- 
dellos of old, where the main 
attraction is sex. but inaless 
open nature. 

Or maybe it is because of 
the fact that 1 don't like to 
sit down and try to act cool 
while I drink 

I don't mean this to sound 
like I am anti social, it is 
just that there is a limit 
on how much money I can 
threw away to someone who 
thinks they are doing me a 
favor by allowingme to drink 
in their establishment, and 
the amount of humor I can see 
in some guy getting Juiced 
and trying to hustle some 
girl 

If the world is a stage 
and everyone is an actor, 
than the singles bars are 
surely the sets for some of 
the tnore humorous come- 
dies that I have seen. 



Write On! 

And one and on and 
and on and on an on 



on and on and on 



Repetition makes a point Make yours 
by writing for the Harbir^ger. Right 
On! 

Sports Editor and writers needed, contact 
the Harbinger, Rm. A - 367 

Sports Editor and writers needed, contact 
the Harbinger, Rm A - 367 



LevPs 




all we 
carry* 



Over 4 tons per store. 
Including Levi's forqals 
Levi's Sta-Presf paTO 
It s the world s greatest 
selection It s yours 



!Vfiilhronk<GoiriVlill) 
Niles. III. 967-5596 



Counseling 



(From page 2) 

cisions regarding courses, 
curricula, vocational goals, 
personal and social pro- 
blems. Help inmakingthese 
decisions, whether personal 
or career related, are avail- 
able to all students. Here 
the student has an atmos- 
phere in which he can dis- 
cuss, in confidence whatever 
troubles him. 

Counseling at Harper may 
be broken down into three 
major areas. These being 
Educational, Vocational and 
Personal Educational gui- 
dance is one that is most 
sought This is a valuable 
sei*vice in helping the student 
learn and apply his skills 
Vocational guidance pro- 
vides test anr' testing inter- 
pretation in regards to the 
potentum of the student 
Here the counselors conduct 
interviews that are designed 
to aid the student to plan a 
course of study in the line 
with his occupational inte- 
rests Personal guidance is 
one of th services that the 
Harper counselors regard as 
any advice that the student 
needs to solve one of his 
inner problems. Thisadvice 
on birth control, general sex 
education and drug abuse. 

Working together with the 
counselors can achieve your 
goal of obtaining an educa- 
tion equipping you for a full 
life in today's ever changing 
world. 



•w.i 



*'.* 



%%*A.* 



FJxprciiM 

Your 

Love 




Hv KxrhnnKini; 

lOK GOLD 
DOUBLE HEART 

RirlhiKtiK- Kinii^ 




Imagine! Your love en 
twined in beautiful tiearts 
and doubly expressed with 
both o( your birthstones 
'. . . .mdalfi^^reCiouS lOK 
.pllii* or while gold 

BYHRING JEWELERS 

2.5.5 K .\\V Hwy. 
I'alatim. Hi 



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Photo by L.R. Kiol 



STUDENTS with HARPER ID 

20% OFF 
Automotive parts & supplies 

PAUTME AUTOMOTIVE 



Hiiurw 

MON. KRL 

8 a.in. - 9 p.m. 

SAT 
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SUN. 
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546 E. NorthweHt Hiwav 
Palatine. III. 6(H>6'7 



: 358 2550 



Claseifirds 



I.CMI at School. Tucs. 11/3. 
■mall white box with denial 
inktrumenu. If found please 
return to Harbinaer office. 
HIdK A .367 Reward 

Baby StMer WaNtad. 12/27 thru 
1/2/74 al our home. 3-1/2 yean 
old SrHAIXIHl K(;. MR.S. R. 
HORCK.S. SS4-I250. 

Opportunity to Earn Galra Money. 

Male and Female Hdp Wanted. 

Part-time Worti Available. 

Office work -consumer interviewing. 

Market Research Compai.y. 

Irwin Broh & Assoc. 

1001 H Touh- rv. fialnca 

2V7-7SIS 

1964 Pontiac Cat for .Hale. 
17 S, I'/B winterised */ snows. 
Merhanlrally sound. 
Asking S.I50.(K» 
( ontnrt .loc M7173.V 

1967 Honda 30.5 
Hardly used. 10-speed 
HelRian Racer. Flaminff red 
(;ary Kxt. 272 (after 12:00) 
or 272-41. 52 (Sundays) 

HEATH KIT 

X'acuum tube, voltanc meter 
FOR SALK. Model No. IM 28 
( o»t In 1970 J72.60, 
Will sell for $50.00 
Measures AC. IK T, DC , & Ohms 
Call Martin Fox at 428-1.106 
(MIST sell need money) 
(Needs tube for AC 
will pay the cost). 

Wanted 

2 end tables and cocktail tables, 
dk. wfKKl preferred, under $15eac. 
Call .397.3414 after 4:30 p.m. 

Bed, matress, springs, and frame. 
FuU size. SI 5. Call 882-4718. 

.New Furtnlture For Sale 
Original 

OriRinal 

Price Asking 
Lowry Organ 
Theaterette $2,100. 
King .Size Bed 
& Foot Bench 
(Dk, (loid Velvet) 600. 
Burnt Orange Sofa 400. 
2 C hairs 
Dk. (Jold Velvet 175.ea. ca.60 



$1,300. 



300. 

aoo. 



175. ca. «*. 75. 



3 Clc»r«tlc Tablta 

Marble Tops & 

Gold Pcdcatais 

I Lamp -Tall 

Walnut 175 75. 

Phone 593 1495. Ask for Monica. 

Combination Krtcxrr RcfrigeTalli.' 
Scars $75 00. CmklMll i.tble.rml- 
•blr A liiblr Irak S20 (Nt. 
915.00 It S.^ (M) respectlt-rh 

Mi-snt'' 

•70 Capri 

2300 cc V.6 racing engirte 
four on the floor 
deluxe Kuropean slyltna 
looks and runs Cireal? 
C>ood gas mileage 
$1950.00 or bMlofTcf. 

Call au-tmo 

TOGOOOHOMK 

9 month old female sMoioycd 
AKC registered w/ papers 
and in the BKST of health. 
Ciood w/ children. 

Needs someone at home to 
take care of here. 
INqiriRK: After 6 p.m. 
Tun. thru Sat. 38»4II«3 

STUDKNTS TRANSFERRING 

10 Northern Lniversity. 
Live off Campus in a 
quiet, friendly Frat. House 
January May $.30(1 00 
Call (815) 7.'}6 9625 or 

Visit at 1020 HUlcrest. DeKalb. 



l_Awr?ENCE R Kiel 

PHOTOGRAPHER 



asB-aat* 




Indmns oncp hnri I he hot idow 
tli.it it wounrii'd the firp iif>d 
to pnkc uD the fire! 



^ 



-t' 



. <■ 'I 



,-'/ 



4 



paO0 10 



T€ 



HARBINGER 



December 3, 1973 



Dec. 3. 1973 



f€ 



r 



Capping ceremony held 
for pra€ti€al nursing stodents 



Capping ceremonies held 
Friday (November 16) for 29 
Harper College Pratical 
Nursing students gave 
observance to a first plateau 
of the full -year program. 
According to Mrs. Lola 
Smith, program coordinator, 
the students have received 
training at this stage which 
enables them to give basic 
patient care. 

Continued participation In 
the program curriculum will 
prepare students for Li- 
censed Pratical Nursing 
state examinations at the 
time of class graduation in 
August of 1974. 

Candle lighting during the 
ceremony symbolized the 
coming out of a dark age 
into enlightenment brought 
about by further education. 
Friends and families of the 
students also heard the Flo- 
rence Nightingale Pledge of 
1893 repeated by the class 
Members of the class are: 
From Arlington Heights: 
Miss Mary Jo Botterman, 
Miss Cynthia Dronwell. Miss 
Patricia Erlander. Miss 



Paula Rogan, and Miss Laur- 
ie Whelton. 

From Barrlngton: Miss 
Nancy Gravett. 

From Buffalo Grove: Miss 
Janet Gallagher. 

From Carpentersville: 
Mrs Bontia Smid, Miss Lin- 
da Jennings and Mrs. Phyl- 
lis Wilson. 

From Des PUines: Mrs. 
GerladMte Nerby. - , ^ 

From Elgin: Mrs. Pa- 
tricia Rasmussen. 

From Elk Grove Village: 
Miss Donna Reichelt 

From Mount Prospect: 
Miss Kyle Wold. Mrs Sue- 
Cheng Chen. Mrs Tina 
Marie Schwennesen and Miss 
Donna Vos burgh. 

From Palatine: Miss 
Kathleen Bekier. Miss Rita 
Burke, Miss Patricia May, 
Miss Judy Ringen and Miss 
Kathleen linger. 

From Rolling Meadoirs: 
Miss Barbara Balmes and 
Miss Eileen Murphy 

From Roselie: Miss Ju- 
dith Engel and Miss Gayle 
Muka. 




Harp«- music major Judy Robinson will be mastering 
her viola at the upcoming concert 

Music department presents. . .. 



Stodent representative petitions 



Petidons are now avail- 
able for those students who 
wish to run for the office 
of Student Representative to 
the Board of Trustees. 

Any person interested in 
running for this ofrice. and 
who is a full time student, 
and a resident at the col- 
lege district is eUgible to 
pick up a petition 

These petitions are avail- 



able from the Student Act- 
ivities office, A337,andthey 
must be returned with 250 
signatures no late r than noon 
Dec 5 

After the petitions are in. 
and the position on ballot is 
determined, there will be a 
general election on Dec. U 
and 12 where the student body 
will decide who the repre- 
sentive will be. 



i 

4- 

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4- 

1^15% Discount 

J ($20.00 or 

more 

purchase) 

on 

CLOTHING 



BOUTIQUE 

TADS*HIP MUGGERS 

COMPLETE HEAD 
SHOP 

UNISEX CLOTHING 
541-6010 



SALE 

Bring 

in 

tills 

Coupon 

for 



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white 

T/8HIRT 

of your choice 

with 



Pants 



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U 



HIP-POCKET 
BOUTIQUE 

1201 N. Elmhurst 
Prospect Hts, 




BY HEIDI JOHNSON 

The Harper College Music 
Department will present two 
concerts. Dec. 3 and 4. fea- 
turing the Community Or- 
chestra and Chorus 

The Harper College Com- 
munity Orchestra, under the 
direction of Dr George Ma- 
das, will present a concert 
Dec 3 The orchestra will 
perform the "Sivana Over- 
ture" by Weber, and Mendel- 
ssohn's "Scotch Symphony" 
Jacquelyn Giles, soloist 
from Arlington Heights, will 
sing "Musetu's Walu" by 
Puccini and "Rltorns Vin- 
cltor" by Verdi. 

Jacquelyn Giles made her 
debit at age eighteenas Vio- 
letta in "La Traviau". 
Since then, she has appeared 



in opera, as guest artist 
with symphony orchestras, 
in oratorio, and solo re- 
citals and musical comedies 
throughout New England and 
the midwest. 

The concert will be in the 
College Center at 8 p.m. 
Admission is free. 

The Harper College Com- 
unlty Chorus debuts Decem- 
ber 4, accompanied by the 
Harper College Community 
Orchestra Anthony Moe- 
tardo of Elk Grove Village 
will direct |he chorus in the 
"Gloria" by Vivaldi, and 
The Song of Christmas" 
by Roy Ringwald, arranger 
for Fred Waring 

The concert begins at 8:00 
p.m. in the College Center. 
There is no admission 
ci»rge. 



ffffM C§lhi9 wa99ai9$ ^§trf cm ftif 



Triton College is spon- 
soring an All Nations Poetry 
Contest open to anyone, any- 
where Entrees must be re- 
ceived by April 1, 1974. 
Winners will be announced 
at the College's Spirits of 
Spring festival that will be 
held on the Triton campus 
April 30 - May 3, 1974. 

The All Nations Poetry 
Contest is open to anyone, 
published or unpublished - 
grammar school student, 
high school student, college 
student, senior 'citizen, 
housewife, businessman 
Poems are to be submitted 
under three thematic cat- 
egories: 

1. Passage to Self 

2. Passage to Nature 

3. Passage to Space 
Contestants are limited to 

one poem for each theme 
If the poem is not in Eng- 
lish, the English translation 



must accompany the foreign 
language submission Each 
poem must be entered on a 
separate sheet of paper, 
along with the name of poet, 
eddress. country of origin, 
end thematic area Win- 
ners will be announced 
during the Spirits of Spring 
festival. 

Preliminary Judging of 
submitted poems will be 
made by a committee of 
Triton faculty and students. 
Final judging will be made 
by Donald Hall, renowned 
American poet. 

Submissions should be 
made to Triton College. 
All Nations Poetry Contest, 
2000 Fifth Avenue, River 
Grove 60171 For further 
Information, write or call 
Malcolm Berd or Robert 
Hlavin, Instructors Inhum- 
anities and English, at Triton 
College, 456-0300, exts. 303 
and 227, respectively. 



9QBOOOOBOOBOeO 



Kerry's & Larry's Ski Repair 



Bings Adj. & Cleaned 
Hot Wbi 
Base Repairs 
Flat Filling 
PACKAGE 
Poles Shortened 



lie S CHESTNUT 
ARLrNOTON MT8 . ILL. 60003 

(312)259-7281 aik for Kerry 

Mon.-ThurMlay 7:00-9:30 
SaL 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. 



IQBOBOBOOBO 




IT'S A PARTY 

By HEIDI JOHNSON 

Its almost that time again. 
Time to start acting like a kid 
(If you haven't been already) 
and make out your Christmas 
list. Who said Santa doesn't 
come to Harper? He'll be 
here, and you can sit on his 
lap too. Dec. 14th, atthefifth 
annual Christmas party. 

The party will be from 1 
p.m. till4p.m. intheLounge, 
and its free. The party is 
spcmsored by the Office of 



and the Pro- 
and provides 
students and 
together and 



the President 
gram Board 
a chance for 
faculty to get 
clQwn around. Refreshments 
are provided for about one 
thousand people, and there 
will be a twenty -foot tall 
tree and other decorations in 
the lounge. An or^n will 
also be brought up and there 
will be singing and "other 
merriment." Students with 
children are Invited to bring 
them to the party also. 

The decoratingtakBsplace 
Dec. 7, and any donations of 
ornaments would t>e apprec- 
iated, as most of theoma- 
mettts were destroyed in the 
fleldhouse fire. Donations 
should be brought to A -336. 
Anyone wishlngtodesignor- 
naments Inquantitiesmaybe 
furnished with some d the 
supplies and should contact 
the Student Activities Office. 
A -336. 



Wallace 



(From page 1 ) 

regard to emergency car- 
diopulmonary resusication. 
Gordon Wallace has 
changed the filing system 
In order to help locate peo- 
ple easier and quicker. This 
may not sound important, 
but Wallace assured us that 
is helps you when you need 
a case number for insur- 
ance or you need your park- 
ing permit number for 
some reason. 

He has also set up a spot 
map for accident location 
and theft locations with 
times so they can find out 
problem areas and help re 
duce them. 

Wallace has a bachelor's 
degree In sociology from 
Roosevelt College and Is a 
third of the way to his 
masters in Urban Studies. 
When asked why he came 
to Harper, Mr. Wallace said, 
"Hiked the place." He went 
on to say he thinks the 
place Is fantastic In its fac- 
ilities and Is a pleasure 
working with a college com- 
munity because the people 
are well educated. 

Mr. Wallace says that any- 
one is welcome to come In 
and talk with him about 
grievances or suggestions. 
He Is in his office from 9 
a.m. to 5 p.m. every week- 
day. 



J 



H/1%INGER 



P*g* II 



Hawk's conference hockey preview 




A 



•73- "74 Hawks all-conference hockey team. 



1 



H you con hold a perKil 
You con be on Ace 

REPORTER 

Sports Staff is noodod 

K you tfiink our coverage it Bod, 

Come and Change It. 

A-367, Horbingor 



By DENNIS SOBOJ 

During a series of try- 
uts. In which over sixty 
students appeared. Coach 
Bob Downny had his oppor- 
tunity to select players for 
the hockey season. 



Jerseys from Wilmette, 
Winnetka and popular area 
teams masked athletics, in- 
dication the impressive 
blend that will wear Hawk 
uniforms 

The schedule starts Sun- 
day, Dec 9, with an exhib- 
ition game at Loyola Univer- 
sity, at the new Skokie Ice 
Rink, Gr&sspoint andChiirch 
Road, at 5 p.m. 

Our conference games 
will Include teams from 
Joliet, Morton Grove, Tri- 
ton, DuPage and Moraine 
Valley and Parkside. an 
alternate university at Wis- 
consin 

Home games will beplayed 
at Rolling Meadows Sports 
Complex. Admission for 
students is 50 cents. 




^•w%f% H €9mp€f9 j« nationols 



When June 11, 1974, rolls 
around. Harper's Bob Pow- 
ers will be traveling to the 
National Golf Tournament 

Powers, from Nlles Town- 
ship High School, shot a 155 
on the 18- hole orange course 
at the Universigt ot Illinois 
in the state meet to earn a 
spot as one of onlynlnegolf- 
ers from Illinois to compete 
In the nationals 

The Hawks finished ti)e 
season in a third- place tie 
with Oakton in the Skyway 
Conference. Both teams 
9-5 records 



"We expected to do a lit- 
tle bit tetter than we did," 
said Hawk ''oach Roger 
Bechtold, "but we didn't 
perform well in our two 
meets against Mayfair" 

Mayfair finished second in 
the conference 

Hawk Scott Persson (Glen- 
brook) was another sundout 
as he shot a 74 on the last 
day of the state tournament. 
His score, which came on 
a rainy day. helped boost the 
Hawks from fourteenth place 
into the seventh spot in the 
state meet 



BIRDS OF KEY 



1^ 



PRE-REGI8TRATION DATE FOR 

SPRING SEMESTER 1974 



Registration for the Spring Semester 1974 will be held 
on the following dates, and processed through the ter- 
minals at the following times: 
December 7 9:00 A.M.- 12:00 A.M. 

1:00 P.M. - 4:00 P.M. 
December 14 9:00 A.M.- 12:00 A.M. 

1:00 P.M. - 4:00 P.M. 
January 9 5:30 P.M. - 8:30 P.M. 

January 11 9.00 A.M. 12:00 A.M. 

1:00 P.M. 4:00 P.M. 

FEE PAYMENT SCHEDULE 
Fees are due In the Business Office according to the fol- 
lowing schedule: 

FEES MIST BE PAID 

DATE OF REGISTRATION ON OR BEFORE 

December 7 January 3, 1974 

December 14 January 4, 1974 

Januar>' 9& 11 January 17, 1974 

Questions regarding fee payments should be referred to 
the Admissions and Registrars Office, Room A213. 

VoDo Seminar 



V.D. - Truths and Conseq- 
uences - is the topic for 
presentation by Jerry Lama 
from the Institute for Sex 
Education on Tuesday. Dec 
4. The seminar will be held 
in A -241 and will begin at 
12 noon Jerry has been on 
our campus before and has 
been well received by the 
student body during his 
candid presentations on V.D. 

Gonorrhea ranks as the 
third highest communicable 
disease in our country to- 
day and veneral disease is 
becoming more and more 
difficult to cure. Veneral 
dis«ise can be quredif treat- 



ed properly and immed- 
iately, and I hope you will 
assist me in maWngthe stud- 
ent body aware of this 
seminar where appropriate 
Information on V.D will be 
given. 

The Health Service sees 
students and refers them 
for free treatment when re- 
quested for V D. This sem- 
inar Is sponsored by the 
Health Service and funded 
by student activity fees 

If you have anyquestlons 
concerning the seminar, 
contact Ms Liz McKay, Dir- 
ector, Environmental Health 
Room A -362 




Before you buy 

Auto Insurance 
c^" 495-0648 

* Good student discount ' Motorcycles all CC'$ 

• Driver training credit ' Financial Responsibility 

♦ 20% Savings ♦or faculty 

Brodley/Brodley Agency Insuronce Inc. 

I PLANS CHANGE? 

CONSIDER METROPOLITAN 



JARE will provide anrac 
tiv« Holtday Cards to lerxl to 
your friends, telling them that 
the hungry, the needy, or the 
sick overseas will receive CARE 
atd sent by you tn their name 
To participate, simply 

"Serxl CARE the names and 
addresses of friends with $2 
for each name on your list, or 
as much as you possibly can 

CAPE. Inc. 220 S. State St. 
Dept. N. Chicago, II. 60604 



• ACCOUNTING 

• ADMINISTRATION 

• BOOKKEEPING 

• MANAGEMENT 



• AOM ASSISTANT 

• EXEC SECRETARY 

• LEGAL SECRETARY 

• MEDICAL TRANS 



FINANCIAL AID AVAILABLE 
FREE X)B PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE 




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Vua Tax rvvutAnan, 

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Fee tvf-«TO»f , A«»'* 

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STUDEBAKER nov 22 thru 

THEATER dec 15 

THE SENSATIONAL BROADWAY & LONDON HIT! 




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QHlM|h| (Mn' DtiM itin • I tM' ««l 

hlRIANlEDFORD 

Mon Thurt Ev<>s 8 00 Fli 8. Sat fv»l 3 30 

Mats Wrd K Sal 2 00 
Stuctontt Shownnq I D » may putch.iw t.cket* 
at all pncf ranges lor S2 00 ijndet r(»gul*t Boa 
Office pnee (#»e»pt Sumrdavii 



1 

t 



6' 



^ 



-v 



page 12 



TC 



H>1?BiNGER 



Dec. 3, 1973 



Kimbrough plays best gome ever 



It was a perfect Saturday 
afternoon for a fotball 
game. The light gray clouds 
occasionally gave way to the 
sun and the tenperature 
stood at about seventy de- 
grees. 

On a small field In Rock- 
ford, minoia the Harper 
Hawks were hoioing onto a 
28-21 lead against the top 
team in the state, the Rock 
Valley Trojans. 

In the fourth quarter, the 
Hawk quartert>ack faded back 
to pass to his favorite tar- 
get, Erwin Kimbrough. He 
let to of a perfect pass that 
eluded Kimbrough in the end 
zone, one of the few times 
the sure- handed split end 
failed to capitalize on a pass 
play. 

Trotting over to the side- 
line, Kimbrough went off to 
a spot where he could be 
along, to think about the 
missed pass. 

Despite encouragement 
from his teammates, Kim- 
brough was angry at himself. 
His teammates knew what a 
great help he had been to 
the team and theydidn't want 
one small mistake togethim 
down on himself But Kim- 
brough i^ the type of foot- 
ball player that wanta to be 
100 percent efficient 100 per- 
cent of the time On the 
football fiekl. he s a perfec- 
tionist 

Kimbr' jgh has been play- 
ing football for eight years 
He sUrted by playing with 
neighborhood kids on the 
Chicago South Side when 
they'd get together to have 
a game 

He then played for Morgui 
Park High School in Chicago 
where, in his senior year, 
he earned city and national 
honors He made the Chi- 
cago Sun -Times All -Area 
team where it was stated that 
he "single - hand edly pushed 
Morgan Park as far as the 
quarterfinals with his ex- 
cellent double - duty play. " 
He also made Sports Ill- 



ustrated All - American 
squad Kimbrough, who lives 
in Rolling Meadows, now 
plays for Harper College. 
"Erwin had grcist pro- 
blems getting accepted into a 
big university, aithough he 
had numerous scholarship 
offers. So he came to Har- 
per to get academically in 
tune with college, ' ' said John 
Eliasik. Kimbrough's coach 
at Harper. 

According to Kimbrough. 
the coaches at Illinois State 
University recommended 
that he take his first two 
years at Harper. It came 
against Kennedy - King, when 
he collected 116 passing 
yards and scored two touch- 
downs for the Hawks in the 
28-17 win 

"I may have had a few 
better games in high school, 
but I can't recall any, "Kim- 
brough reflected. 

Studying physical educa- 
tion inschool, Kimbrough al- 
so plays basketball with 
marked skill . He made the 
Chicago All - City team last 
year for Morgan Park, but 
he is undecided on whether 
he will wear a Hawk bas- 
ketball Jersey after hanging 



up his football pads for the 
season. 

"It all depends on how my 
knees feel," he said. 
"Sometimes, when I'm just 
sitting around, they get stiff 
on me. I really don't know 
what the problem is, bit it's 
nothing serious." 

Kimbrough has also done 
Some high jumping for the 
Morgan Parit track team. He 
feels that each sport, in a 
way, complements the next. 

"When you go out for more 
than one sport, there's no 
time for a real rest, so you 
usually stay in good physi- 
cal shape." he explained. 

The main reason Kim- 
brough has participated in 
sports over the years is 
because of the er\joyment he 
gets out of them To him, 
"sports are fim." 

Kimbrough knows no 
better than anyone else how 
his chances are to becom- 
ing a professional athlete, 
even though he would like to 
make the big leagues. 

Td like to make it to the 
pros if things work out 
right," was Kimbrough's re- 
sponse, "and if they don't, 
that will be alright too " 







HOCKEY 






Sat, Dec. 


15 


Joiiet 


4:30 


RMSC 


Sat., Jan. 


5 


Morton Grove 


4:30 


RMSC 


Sat., Jan. 


15 


U. ofWiac., Parkside 


4:30 


RMSC 


Tues., Jan. 


22 


Morton Grove 


4:00 


WUlow Ice Ch 


Sat., Feb. 


2 


DuPage 


4:00 


RMSC 


Sun., Feb. 


10 


U. of Wise.. Parkside 


6:00 


Kenosha I A 


Sat, Feb. 


16 


Triton 


4:30 


RMSC 


Sun., Feb. 


17 


DuPage 


1:00 


Lisle 


FrL, Feb. 


22 


Triton 


12:30 


Park Ridge 


Tue«. Feb. 


26 


Joliet 


4:00 


Joliet 


Sat, Mar. 


2 


Moraine Valley 


4:30 


RMSC 


Coach-Bob Downing 







All RMSC games are played at Rolling Meadows Sports 
Complex, 3900 Owl Drive. Rolling Meadows. 



Bechtoid optimistic 




During the 1973 football season, Kimbrough was the 
leading pass receiver with 29 passes for 457 yards 
gained. He was also the leading scorer with 50 points. 

(Photo by Chuck Zemeske) 



Tues 
Thurs 
Tues 
Fri 
Sat 
Tues 
Thurs" 
Fri 
Wed» 
Sat 
Thurs 
Sat 
Men 
Thurs 
Fri 
Tues 
Sat 
Tues 
Fri 
Tues 
Sat 



HARPER COLLEGE 

Dec 4 
Dec 6 
Dec 11 
Dec 14 
Dec 15 
Dec 18 
Dec 27- 
Dec 



1973-74 

Elgin 
May fair 
Mc Henry 
Kennedy- King 
DuPage 
Oliver Harvey 



BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 



8 

7; 

8: 

7; 

7; 

8: 



00 
30 
00 
30 
30 
00 



28 



Jan 
Jan 
Jan 
Jan 
Jan 
Jan 
Jan 
Jan 
Feb 
Feb 
Feb 
Feb 
Feb 



Highland Classic 

2 DuPage 7:30 

5 Illinois State J.V. ' 

10 ♦ Triton 7:30 

12 * Waubonsee 7:30 

14 * OaktoH 7:30 

17 Elmhurst J.V. 5:15 

25 * Lake County 7:30 

29 * Mayfalr 8:00 

2 ♦ McHenry 2:00 

5 ♦ Elgin 7:30 

8 ♦ Triton 8:00 

12 ♦ Waubonsee 7:30 

16 ♦ Oakton 7:30 

*Skyway Conference 

All Home Garnes Played at St. Viator's H.S. 
1213 E. Oakton, Arlington Heights 



Home 
Away 
Hone 
Away 
Home 
Home 

Freeport 

Away 

Away 

Away 

Home 

Away 

Away 

Away 

Home 

Away 

Away 

Home 

Away 

Home 



"Optimism " was the first 
work that came to Roger 
Bechtold's lips when the sub- 
ject of basketball was 
brought up. 

Bechtoid, in his second 
year as coach of the Har- 
per Hawks basketball team, 
anxiously awaits the start 
of the upcoming season on 
Nov. 17. 

"I think we have a real 
good chance to compete for 
the conference title, " said 
Bechtoid 'It's difficult to 
predict anything now. but 
we've got the potential to win 
it all if we work together as 
A TEAM' 

Waubonsee. Tritonand de- 
fending champion Lake 
County are the teams Bech- 
toid sees as being the ones 
to beat 

The main strength of the 
Hawk team appears to be 
over - all team ball - hand- 
ling, which is much improved 
over last year. 

"We also have some good 
shooters, which Is helpful 
to the team. " Bechtoid said 

The Hawks have been 
working on being better de- 
fensively and blocking up the 
middle of the lane Also, 
the over - all quickness is 
not exceptional. 

'That's hard to over- 
come," Bechtoid explained, 
"but alert play and 100 per- 
cent effort should overcome 
that problem." 

The Hawks willbesticking 
to the basic 1-3-1 set offense 
and the same type of man - 
to - man defense they hav( 
used previously. 

"We re also going to run 
the fast break as much as 



possible. " said Bechtoid, 
who coaches three years at 
Evanston High School and two 
years on the freshman level 
at Southern Illinois Univer- 
sity. 

The seven top players out 
of the 15 - man squad have 
already been pretty well de- 
cided by BechtoM. Dave 
Schmidt, at 6'9", willreturn 
as the Hawks' center 

"Dave was strong the last 
part oflast season, and we're 
hoping he picks up where he 
left off, " Bechtoid said, 
"He's a good shooter " 

Steve Heldt is another re- 
turnee at the forward posi- 
tion, as i s Chuck Neary at the 
high post. 

Two freshmen are among 
the starting five. Tom Mar- 
zee and Mike Millner Mar 
zee will play the point with 
Millner filling the other for- 
ward position. 

Steve Schmidt and Brian 
Broth will be the first t*o 
substitutes to fill in for the 
Hawks. Schmidt at the high 
poast and Groth at the point 
position. 

"Either of these players 
might break into the starting 
lineup" Bechtoid said 

The Hawks' first game is 
on November 17 when they 
play the returning alumni at 
St Viator High School in Ar- 
lington Heights Their first 
conference game wi 11 be aga- 
inst Lake County on Decem- 
ber 1, a home game All 
home games will be played 
at St Viator 




J 



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H/1RBINGER 



Vol. 7, No. 12 



William Rainey Harper College. Algonquin and Roselle Roads. Palatine. Illinois 60067. 312- 



397-3000 




December 10, 1973 



Photo by L.R. Kiel 




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Student TRtp. 
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endorses studrnf 
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Page 2 



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H/«BINGER 



December 10, 1973 



December io, 1973 



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Self-paced teaching could become a reality for Harper 



By RICHARD KUSNIEREK 

Mention computerized 
teaching to some students 
and in most cases, a var- 
iety of partisans will crop 
up. A few might think the 
idea innovative or highly 
exploratory. Most will lam- 
ent on the points at dehu 
manization to the extent<^of 
the student being reduced 
from just a face in the crowd 
to only a number Ofcourse, 
some radicals might envi- 
sion the day when human 
teachers are nolongerneed- 
ed Conjured up thoughts of 
rows upon rows of students 
staring into audiovisual ter- 
minals, connected to the 
master computer absorbing 
imformation like human 
sponges. 

The Increasing use of 
computers in education is 
inevitable But dehumani- 
zation of students would be 
the direct effect of impro- 
per management of compu- 
ter facilities Two of Har- 
pers psychology instructors. 
Mr. Robert Pasen and Mr 
Jim Roll, have explored the 
approach to a computer - 
managed system Their 
fifkdings have produced 



provacative thoughts and 
innovative ideas. Namely, 
the system can work, and 
work extremely well, bene- 
fiting the students in any 
area of study With proper 
management, and foresight 
in implementation. the 
learning process would be 
remarkably improved 

This teaching system is 
based on the premise that 
different students learn and 
retain material at different 
rates. A self paced com- 
puter - managed system 
would enable a person loo 
learn at a rate most suited 
to his labilities and interests 
This, briefly, is the basic 
educational advantage bf the 
system. But upon deeper 
exploration, many variations 
of this system can be ap- 
plied to countless aspects 
of academics 

TaMng the example of a 
student who learns at a slo- 
wer rate than his peers, a 
complete set of learning 
tapes would be at his dis- 
posal. One need only to pro- 
gram thecomputerforatape 
of a lecture he may have 
not understood clearly 
enough, and the emlre lec- 
ture virould be played back 



for him. Not only can he 
watch and listen to the tapes 
at his own rate, if he wishes, 
he would be able to play 
back the tapes as often as 
necessary. 

When the time comes for 
the student to take a test, 
a device might be fitted on 
the terminal screen to vali- 
date the students identity 
by fingerprints, much like 
the device used in the movie 
"The Andromeda Strain" or 
by voice prints Once the 
student completes the test, 
the computer would instant- 
ly run thru a multiple series 
of events. It would show the 
student whiclTquestions were 
missed Based on the wrong 
answers, the computer would 
indicate extra reading or 
work to be done in the par- 
ticular area of weakness. 
In a different area of teac- 
hing with this system, one 
must not overlook the ca- 
pabilities to teach invalids 
or shut ins. With a por- 
table unit, a person who could 
not physically go to school 
uses the portable until as a 
televiewer By dialing a pre- 
coded mmber. this person 
could call the school. choose 
the lessons he needs, sit back 



and learn. One positive 
characterisitic is that if the 
school doesn't have some bit 
of information, by dialing 
another number the person 
can reach a central infor- 
mation station, located any- 
where in the country, to pro- 



cure the information he 
needs. 

The total spectrum of 
teaching in the manner has 
not yet fully been realized, 
but Roll and Pasen have 

(Turn to page 14) 





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The joy of glvingat Christ- 
mas, apparently noias true 
for the many shoplifters who 
are appreheraled each year 
as the season approaches 
Who are these people and 
what are their reasons'' 
There are much more 
hojsewives than one would 
think, with teenagers follow- 
ing a close second.' replied 
Mr Robert Loftus. Security 
Manager at Marshall Fields 
in Woodfield Mall Loftus 
said it usually depends on 
circumstances, the person, 
his situation and the mer- 
chandise in possession 

JC Pennys. also in Wood - 
field claimed that 75 percent 
of those apprehended are 
teenagers, and are usually 



turned over to the parents 
"Last year fifty violators 
were prosecuted. " re- 
marked Mr Mc Arthur. Chief 
of Security at Pennys As 
with Fiekls. Penny's policy 
is determined by the cir 
cumstances surrounding the 
case. 

Detective Wir^elhake of 
the Palatine Police station 
Center released the follow- 
ing information regarding 
punishment procedures. 

Anyone seventeen years of 
age and over can ha vea theft 
complaint signed by the store 
and then follow through in 
court If the item is valued 
at less than $150 it is a 
misdemeanor and the penalty 
can be up to 1 year in prison 
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both 



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Mr. Pasen (left) and Mr. Roll (right) try Iheir hands at 
operating Plato IV, a new computerized self-teaching 
"•«**•<»**• (Photo by Chuck Zemeske) 

Shoplifters beware f 

By DIANE DIBARTOLOMEO 



H/4RBINGER 



The student body at Har 
per Community College will 
once again be requested to 
cast their btillots in another 
election this week 

On December 11 and 12, 
the students will be asked 



Candidates express views in rep. race 



Page 3 




Candidate Rick Mclntyre 

who they wish to represent 
them as the Student Repre- 
sentative to the Board of 
Trustees. 

There are two candidates 
for this posiUon. Rick Mc 
Intyre and Gerald McGlou- 
ghlin. both of whom have 
fulfilled the requirements, 
and obtained 250 signatures 
from the student body on 
their petitions. 



Both candidates feel they 
have established a rapport 
with the student body Mc- 
Gloughlin by talking to indi- 
viduals, getting their ideas, 
and Mclntyre by being a Stu- 
dent Senator, and by talking 
to the people that he re- 
presents. 

Altho he is now a senator, 
Mclntyre states that if he is 
elected to the office of Stu- 
dent Representative he would 
resign his position with the 
Senate, to devote the most 
amount of time possible to 
the Representative position. 
McGloughlin stated "I 
do^'t believe a person can 
do the job. (Student Rep ) 
and be a Senator also. ' ' 

The responsibility of the 
Student Representative is 
one that is not too clear 
The law states that he is 
to be a non-voting member 
of the board, and this is all 
it says There are no spe- 
cifics drawn out astohowhe 
is to complete his term of of- 
fice, other than the dates of 
his term. 

McGloughlin and Mclnt^^re 
feel that the basic re^KMisi- 



bility of this office is to bet- 
ter the communication be- 
tween the student body, and 
the board, and to bring ideas 
to the board to help better 
the educational, social, and 
other processes that the 




Cafidid.(.> Gerald McGloughlin 



board acts on 

McGloughlin feels that 
"My interest would be that 
of the students, and leave 
the Board to other matters 
such as building materials" 
Mclntyre feels that " the 
Unique long range ability of 
the board should be based 
on how it will efect the day 
to day living of the student 
When they make a policy 



Faculty Senate petitions Boord 



By DIANE DIBARTOLOMEO 

• Three months have gone by 
since. Robert Powell. Facu- 
lty Senate President attacked 
ihe Harper administration. 
In that attack. Powell said the 
administration was "unde- 
mocratic and monolithic. " 
which heclaimed. threatened 
to turnHarper into "an over- 
blown, dispirited and gen- 
erally bad institution " 

Things have not yet sim- 
mered down for Powell as 
he is prepared to hit the 
administration with a peti- 
tion demanding faculty voice 
in the long range planning 
of classroom design 

Powells main complaint 
is the emphasis which the 



administration puts on large 
lecture halls The teacher - 
student contact'said Powell. 
Is jeapordized by this pre 
sent system. 

"One difference in the 
community college, is that 
the student is isolated. ' ' said 
Powell He went further on 
to explain that because of 
the size of the lecture halls, 
the students miss out on the 
opportunity of getting to know 
tiieir peers, also an impor- 
tant part of education 

A rather unfortunate dis- 
advantage, is the burden that 
is left to the teachers, when 
It comes to grading papers 
and exams, added Powell 

Why has an agreement be- 
tween the faculty and the 
administration been delayed 



this long? 

Reviewing past action 
which has taken place over 
the delay, it seems as though 
the administration has never 
really taken the charges as 
seriously astheyhaveturned 
out to be. 

When Powell appealed to 
the Board in September, he 
received unwelcome re- 
sponses from membeiV 
Since then the Board ha^ 
proven their lack of con- 
cern by not taking investi- 
gative action on the basis 
of the charges. 

At this Thursdays Faculty 
Senate meeting, the Senate 
will discuss the Faculty 
Evaluation Document, at 
12:45, D-125 



Cemiiv^ dlxUactian 



By CAROLYN GORR 



Bill Quateman makes his 
second appearance at Har- 
per' College. Palatine, on 
Friday. January 4intheCol- 
lege Center Lounge The 
concert begins at 8 pm . 
and the public is invited 

The basic element of Qua - 
temans act is talent and this 
Evanston born entertainer 
has plenty Quateman is a 
singer -composer who plays 
guitar and piano He per- 
formed here last summer 
and attracted such a crowd 
he was booked then for this 
concert. 

Quateman has a B A from 
the University of Iowa and 
for a time he wrote adver- 
tising copy and worked as a 
studio musician and writer 



for a music publishing house 
that makes commercials 

His first album, titled 
"Bill Quateman ". was cut at 
Tirident Studios in London 
and releasedonthe Columbia 
label In addition to his re- 
gular back up players, bas- 
sist Sidney Sims and drum- 
mer Tommy Radtke. Quate- 
man had help from kn im- 
pressive assortment^f ta- 
lent: Caleb Quaye, Senny 
Seiwell, Davey Johnston, 
Leslie Duncan, and Kenny 
Ascher who wrote the string 
arrangements and co-pro- 
duced the entire effort. 

Quateman; *eing touted as 
the "most exciting pop per- 
former to come out of Chi- 
cago since the twilight of the 
jazz era. ■ will perform live 
for students, faculty and the 



general public Prices for 
students and faculty with I D 
are $1 00 and for the pu- 
blic $2 00 



decision, they should be 
more concerned with the stu- 
dent who is going to sit in 
class for threeuuursaday. 



Both Mclntyre and Mc- 
Gloughlin feel that the per- 

(Turn to pagei4) 



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Page 4 



T€ 



H/1RBINGER 



December 10, 1973 



■ December 10, 1973 



Tf 



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OUTPUT- 



» 



H/KBINGER 



WHY MCINTYRE? 

We at the HARBINGER feel that the best interests of 
the Student body will be served by Rick Mclntyre. 

We basf.this conclusion on his past performance as 
Student Seilator, his willingness to cooperate with the 
other organizations on campus, his outgoing manner, 
and his refusal to deny support to an issue because it 
is unpopular with the others who will be voting on it. 
As a Senator, Mclntyre proved himself as a leader, 
by researching, and organizing an issue, and then pre- 
senting this issue to the Senate, even tho it was un- 
popular. 

He has worked with the various organizations, and 
offered them a chance to meet with him on several oc- 
casions. He has also spent his time, and effort in talking 
to the Students on this campus, to find their feelings, and 
find how he could better represent them. This was a fact 
even before he was elected to an office here. 

Mclntyre has the ability to organize material in his 
/nind, being able to intelligently use this material for fur- 
ther reference and rebuttal, litis is an important fact 
when we consider who we are to vote for. as the Im- 
portance of this office needs a person who is not only 
willing, but also most capable. 

He bat expresMd the willingness to resign as Student 
Senator if elected. If this were to happen, there would 
be thoae in the Senate who would be glad to see him 
go, as he does not follow the trend of being a "rubber- 
stamp" Senator. 

We at the Harbinger feel that this Is the type of peraon 
the Student body deserves, one who has the ability to 
think on his feet, and the deslce to do a Job. 

AJtho the (wo candidates appear to be similar in their 
statements, there is a difference in past performance, 
and the aforementioned areas. 

While Mclntyre has been working wtthin the s3-stem 
to change it, his opponent has not. While Mclntyre 
has been ekpressing his ideas in the Senate, where ac- 
tion can be taken on them, his opponent has not. While 
Mclntyre has expressed a desire to make himself avail- 
able to the evening and daytime students by estab- 
lishing office hours, his opponent stales that he does not 
see the value of this type of arrangement, and thusly 
makas it harder to communicate with him, and pos- 
sibly creating a void for those students who wish to 
contact him and cannot find him. 



T 



^ 



% «H>RBINGER ^ 



Pxiitor-in-chlef 
Managing Kditor 
Business Manager 
Activities Kditor 
Cartoon Kditor 
Cartoonists 
Photo Kditor 
Photographers 



Diane DiBartolo..ieo 

L.K. Kiel 

Gary Zdeb 

Heidi Johnson 

Dennis Murray 

Joyce Tarwld. Juan Nunez 

Chuck Zemeske 

Paul Cord, Ken Kissam 



Contributing Staff: 
Dave Gordon, Mary Beth Christy, (Jreg Conway, Sue 
Pollack, Bill Whitehead and Richard Kusnierek. 

Advisor: 
Mr. Sturdevant 



The HAKBINGKR is the student publication for the 
Harper College campus community, published weekly 
except during holidays and mid-terms. All opinions ex- 
pressed oh the editorial page or in the columns are 
those of the writer, and arc not necessarily those of the 
college, its administration, faculty or student body. , 
For information on advertising, rates and publica- 
tion schedule, call or writer Harbinger Business Of- 
fice. 

William Kainey Harper College, Algonquin and 
Uoselle Rds.. Palatine, Illinois 60067. Phone num- 
ber .197 .3000, cxt. 272 and 460. 




Know who you vote for 



With the coming election of a student re- 
preseniauve on the board here at Har- 
per, we feel that a plea for effort on the 
part of the voter is in order. 

This election is one of the most impor- 
tant choices that has ever been offered 
to the students at Harper. The office 
at stake is one that will allow the stu- 
dent body to have a direct link with the 
HonchoB of this in^itute It is a pos- 
ition that requires a person to have all 
the essential ingredients of a leader, 
and ability of a salesman 

We urge the student body to arm them- 
selves with information as to the qual- 
ifications that a person must teve in 
order to sucessfuUy live up to the pos- 
ition that this representative will tave 
Find out what each candidate sunds for, 
and vote with authority that knowledge 
brings. 

This student will dlrectlj effect the 
public opinion of the student body at 
Harper College. The representative must 
have the ability to sell the needs of the 
student body. 

The representative of the student body 
could directly alfect the outcome of bond 
issues If the student In this position is 
one who is rather seedy in character, 
one who will not put forth an effort, or 
one who Just is in the position because 
it looks good on his college transcripts 
the public In this college district is liable 

THANKSI 

The spirit of Christmas brings with it Joy, cheer 
and unity. It's a time for people to leave their troubles 
and grievances behind them and Join together in har- 
mony, celebrating this sacred occasion. 

With a new year right around the corner, comes 
hope and promise of a better year. 

Let us be able to keep the spirit of both of these hol- 
idays with us through out the upcoming year. 

I would like to thank a much deserving staff for their 
cooperation and dedication and long hours put into the 
production of this publication. Without these people, what 
you look forward to reading every Monday, would not 

r "m^"/"""**'*- ^^^'P'* '"^^ ^^^^ «« *hat everyone 
should find under their tree on Christmas morning 
How many can say that of their friends? 
Happy Holiday, enjoy it. We aU need the rest. 

—Editor 



to draw a mental Image of the rest of the 
student body as being the same type of 
Individual, and not worth the extra funds 
If this were to happen, the college would 
possibly find its self with out the funds 
to continue with many of the fine pro- 
grams that It presently offers. 

If the person whom we elect Is one who 
will not serve the college community with 
a total ettort, th«) {he student will pro- 
bably suffer, as the individual student will 
not be receiving the representation that 
he has a right to 

These things might seem rather obvious, 
bia still there are people elected to office, 
who are possibly not the best choice 
We need not look far for examples of this. 
There will still be those students who 
feel that this entire procedure Is not 
worth the time and effort that they might 
be required to give, those who feel that 
they have the rlg||it to remain ignorant 
In the face of so much opportunity for 
knowledge, and those who cl;oose to hide 
\inder the weighty rocks aoathy. Is not 
the true spirit in which this opportunity 
for further voice In our educational pro- 
cess was given 

The State of Illinois has given the stu- 
dent body at Harper voice In our affairs. 
We can either meet this choice with a 
mature and responsible effort, or we can 
continue our pres^it apathetic maner- 
Isms. and immature attitudes. 
The choice is ours. 







\* ~ 



Page 5 



mAi im Hkmna to CHftnwAs? 



Chrishnas time, and bnce again, doUars are in de- 
mand. This one time season of Joy and giving has been 
replaced by the wholesale pursuit of the all powerful 
green. 

We can blame big business for this assult of commer- 
cialism, or we can blame ourselves for allowing this to 
happen. We are the ones who continue to line the 
pockets of business while screaming "Commercialism." 

Madison Avenue and large businesses advertise "Spec- 
ial Gifts for a Special Person", usually something mass 
produced and manufactured with about as much 
warmth as a bowling ball, yet we continue to buy these 
items as fast as they can be produced. 

W'ith dollar in hand, we complain that Christmas 
has become cold and impersonal. 

Whatever happened to the old fashioned Chrtetmaa 
CaroUng with friends and famUy? This too. has gone 
the way of homemade Christmas presents. It has become 
easier to sit in a mechanically warmed house, and lis- 
ten to the recording of various famous people singing 
the season carols, or perhaps not taking the time to do 
this simply because it isn't cool. 

Grand displays and large shopping centers have made 
the ease of Christmas shopping bearable, in fact, more 
»o than the effort required to make up your own presents 
The crowds increase the madness, and the proffto of the 
businessmen, to make matter worse. If this isn't enough, 
the spirit of Christmas dtes when th«^ masses enter the 
doors. People walk around without regard to anyone 
else around. 

Arguments arise over articles, prices, and other trivial 
things. The loudspeakers blast Christmas music, and the 
electrified Christmas spirit fills the air. 

"What will I buy for Martha, she gave me a beau- 
tiful gift last year?" 'You can Pick it up now. and pay 
for It next year." "It Isn't exactly what I wanted, but I 
bought Itfor her anyway. " ConversaUons like this are 
heard everywhere. People aUow themselves to be taken 
In by such lines, and they know that they are not reaUy 
getting what they want. 

Rather than spent the extra Ume. or effort in pursuit 
of a gift, they purchase whatever is at hand, or what 
some salesman can dupe them Into believing they want. 
Rather than look at a gift, as an expression that 
means something, people look at a gift with a Jeweler's 
eye glass, and checkbook balance emotions. 

While it is easier to look to big business, and place 
the blame for the defamation of the Holiday Spirit on 
them, the true loss of Christmas Spirit U something 
that we as individuals have allowed to happen, and 
conversely made happen. 

Next time we go into a store for some Christmas 
shopping and the glare of the plasUc nativity scenes, 
the phony Christmas trees, and the ringing of silver in 
the cash register assaults our senses, rather than blame 
those who are making money, let us get disgusted with 
ourselves for selling out the spirit of this season. 




INPUT 




Person takes it personally 



To the Editor 

Amidst much banality and 
more sniggering sexual allu- 
sion, your November 19 
Personal Column carried 
one line that stands out from 
the rest for its combined 
bad taste and viciousness 
Six entries down from 
"Gassy. I love your pom- 
pons (giggle giggle) 
and only one entry removed 
from Diane. I miss your 
body .'■ 

your columnist writes in a 
less subtle, less seductive 
vein that The only good 
spade is a queen Now. 
this, unlike the rest of the 
column. Is not merely cute. 
In fact. I cannot interpret 
"The only good spade is a 
queen ■ as anything other 
than a blatantly racist and 



rhe leadership qualities 
of, and dependence upon. Ro- 
bert Hayhurst became pain- 
fully evident in his absence 
at last Thursdays Student 
Senate Meeting. 

The Student Senate could 
only take a tangential 
approach with most matters, 
since relianceon Hayhurst is 
almost a classic example of 
affliation and dependency. 
Important procedure after 
procedure was shelved due 
to the unfamiliarity of sub- 
ject matter by the rest of the 
senate. 

One of the more inspiring 
moments came when Rick 
Mclntyre, who is running for 
Student Representative in the 



Student blasts Senate 



election ot December 1 1 and 
12, made a statement that Is 
sure to be regarded by his- 
tory as a ""classic" quote 

If Is does not receive re- 
cognition in "Bartlett s I 
will surel]^ be amazed; 
somewhere between Percy 
Byssche Shelley and Aldous 
Huxley I would think , It 
was: "If you didn't make it 
alst time try and make It 
next time.'" 

In anticipation of the 
charge that I took this quote 
out of ccmtext, my only de- 
fense can be that the stu - 
dent Senate took the entire 
meeting out of context, and I 
was Just following their ex- 
cellent guidance of the stu- 



dent body 

The Student Senate brought 
up an interesting proposal 
They voted Into existence a 
committee to study the re- 
structuring of the Student 
Senate; Here they would be 

appointed, '" or "volun- 
teer " In any case they 
would not be elected by the 
Student body. 

There was one "Idea "that 
came out that will surely live 
in the hearts and minds of 
those present for eternity. 
It points to the real depth 
the Student Senate enjoys 
It was: "Our business isnt 
to think for the students. 

(Turn to page 12) 



sexist comment, and even 
the briefest analysis should 
discover its not so -subtle 
appeal to the latent (sonrw- 
tlmes' overt) racial and 
sexual hatred of white Am- 
erican males 

"Spade.;" of course. Is one 
of white America s terms for 
a black person, and Is syno 
nymous with'coon. jig" 
jlgaboo." "spook. nig 
ger." and other such epl 
thets that stud our rich and 
varied racist vocabulary 
■Queen I assume to be a 
pseudo hip term for a wo 
man Thus, we are to un 
derstand by ' The only good 
spade Is a queen that the 
only good black Is a black 
woman And in the context 
of Cassys pom -pons (gig- 
gle giggle) and Diane's body 
we see why this Is so The 
appeal for approving laugh- 
ter is both racial and sexual 
both racist and sexist After 
all. who among us does not 
know the real talent of black 
folks'' There is one thing 
for which they are all well 
qualified, which they are all 
good at. and in the case of 
their women, good for 



But not only are "spade 
queens, "black broads ' or 
"nigger bitches " (if it 
weren t for the flimsy play- 
ing-card metaphor, yourco- 
lumnist could have said what 
he really meant) good for 
sexual use. but also for sex 
ual violence "Theonlygood 
spade .3 a queen " Is ob- 
viously a play on the old 
racist cliche Theonlygood 
Jap is a dead Jap' (John 



Wayne, circa 1943). The 
only good Indian is a dead 
Indian " (John Wayne, circa 
1948). The only good Cook 
Is a deed Cook" (John 
Wayne, circs 1952. 1965 
1968, 1973, etc. ad 
nauseam) So our response 
is now shaped to Include a 
linking of violence with sex 
and racism Sex and violence 
What else do we associate^ 
with blacks and women afl^ 
way"> And In the case of a 
black woman, oi "spade 
queen, the posslbllltlesare 
endless and enough to set a - 
droolln any red, white & 
blue blooded American 
male 

Our total response, then, 
to The only good spade Is 
a queen is that "tt>e only 
good spade is a queen" pre- 
sumably because It is upona 
spade queen that we can 
vent our lust, violence, and 
hatred And we can do so 
with impunity if enough of 
us accept as humor, and 
thus subscribe to. such 
statements as The only 
good spade Is a queen 

But If. on the other hand, 
we recognize and reject this 
type of appeal to our racist 
and sexist Impulses, we may 
discover within us. perhaps 
not too late, a power born 
of something other than 
hatred We may even dis- 
cover the power to pity Cassy 
for being loved only for her 
pompons, to miss Diane for 
her self as well as her body 
and to forgive your columnist 
his racist and sexist jokes. 
Very truly yours. 
LeRoy J. Mottla 



r 



Ni, 



^ ♦- » 



V 



Page 6 



H 



H/1?BiNGER 



December 10, igj'^ 



December 10, 1973 



H 



0/VE 



OMi 




There are times when I 
just have to sit back in a- 
mazement and wonder how 
our priorities managed to get 
so totally screwed up. 

I realize that we are an 
extremely commercial so- 
ciety and that supposedly 
our economy must function 
as a "Free- Enterprise" 
system. But why can't we 



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differentiate between good 
commercialism and bad 
commercialism. 

This time of year we are 
exposed to what I consider 
to be the best in poor taste 
commercialism. Things are 
getting so bad that it wouldn't 
surprise me to see an ABC- 
TV (CBS and NBC. too) spe- 
cial presenting an animated 
version of the Nativity Story 
narrated by Howard Cosell. 
with commentary by Don 
Merideth. 

It seems to me that peo- 
ple have forgotten what the 
real reason for Christmas is 
all about. Some have even 
forgotten to the point of leav- 
ing Christ completely out of 
X-mas. 

Gift giving, once one of 
the really sincere, personal 



things associated with 
Christmas, has become a 
sort of "beat your neighbor 
in money spent" game. In- 
stead of giving a simple, 
from the the heart gift we 
now seem to ha v6 been total- 
ly indoctrinated into spend- 
ing way too much for poor 
quality presents which we 
generally give to people we 
really don't care about any- 
way. 

Another example of com- 
mercialized Christmas is 
the the greeting card. If 
there's one thing that really 
burns my fat its receiving a 
Christmas card with a snow- 
man, an elf, or Santa Claus 
on the front. The only real 
Christmas cards are those 
that depict what (Thristmas is 
all about. 



Along the same lines, why 
do we feel some great com- 
pulsion to send cards to any- 
one and everyone regardless 
of how we feel about them. 
I can hardly think of any- 
thing more hypocritical. 

I'm not a Jesus freak, 
nor am I an over-zealous 
Christian. What I am is 
someone who is extremely 
concerned about the com 
mercial ruinization of our 
religious holidays. 

Learning experience 

By DIANE braARTOLOMEO 





HEAVY HOLIDAY 

SHOPPING at the whole bit 

cfnd 

a bit of her 




(It*8 In 
The Bag!) 












the Ufheic bit 

MT. PROSPECT PLAZA 
Rand and Central Roads 



FREE! 

Whole Bit tee shirt 

a FREE Whole Bit 
tee shirt with your 
purchase of $10 
or more. Hurry, 
supply limited. 

offer ends when 
we don't have any mure. 



-This was probably the 
best thing that could tMve 
happened. 

-Interesting, fun. Well 
worth the time spent. 

-Worked very well for 
me - others may have 
missed the point. 

-It was well put together. 

-I can only say that if 

what we have hopefully 

learned here is carried out- 

Excellent. 

These are the comments 
of students who rated a lead- 
ership workshop for the var- 
ious clubs and organizations 
here at Harper 

The workshop was heW 
at the Holiday Inn in Elgin. 
, on November 29, and was 
funded through the Student 
Senate, in hope of unifying 
student organizttions The 
three objectives were; to 
unify student organizations, 
by sharing objectives, pro- 
blems, and ideas among the 
Student Senate. Harbinger. 
Program Board WHCM, and 
other student organizations 
To explore new tecivniques 
of reaching the student body 
for resources and commit 
ment on new programs, and 
to improve individual effec- 
tiveness in working with 
others in group situations 
and on a one to one basis 
Ms. Joyce Nolen, and Mr 
John Papandrea and Phill 
Troyer were among those 
who organized and conduc 
ted the workshop 

Aimed at unifying and pro- 
moting understanding among 
the students, the workshop 
entailed group discussions, 
in solving both personal and 
club orientated problems 

Among those clubs repre- 
sented were Ski Qub WHCM 
Harbinger, Program Board. 
Student Senate. Pom Ponand 
Peer Counseling Although 
the turnout was poor, only 
twenty students participated, 
another workshop is being 
planned sometime in March 




If you don't wear clothes from The Whole Bit, why wear clothes at all? 




Applications for the De- 
cember high school equival- 
ency exam will be accepted 
Tuesday at Harper, from 
7:30 to 8:30 p.m. in the 
counseling center. 

The tests are open to 
adults now living in Cook 
County whohave not received 
a high school diploma 
Exams are scheduled for 
December 7, 8. and 14 and 
January 18. 19 and 25 

The test fee is $5. 



H>1RBINGER 



P«Oe 7 



H4RBINGER FOtlES 




mi90CM^ flom«ercund 
gour cavef 



caughtLATT '^ here 

\Jf—r.. «t just iMt 

about tji' 
same timer.' 



here \ 

iMt V 

yearf ^ 



krt goti 

ddrr 



Sockft, /^Bat 
agatn, X 
Masntrt? undar«t 
Mou Com« » 

with m«f fcl 



v^hat'cth' 



AevMilacIcanN 
figure, oOPicer, 
h«% a chronic 

\ 




M/EEKIN 

DISTORTION 

Good place to put ft 

The latest addition to the bumper sticker fad will bt 
given to motorists who want to practice what President 
Nixon preaches. The 12-by-3 inch white and red sticker 
reads: "Excuse me, I'm driving slow to conserve energy." 
One of the stickers was given to President Nixon. 

Even Jesse James knew a bargain 

Lester B. Dill, who operates Meramec Caverns in 
Stanton," Montana was asked by a tourist what attracted 
Jesse James to hide out in the cave. "Free admission," 
DUl replied. ' 

Henry, cruisin' along with the crisis 

White House Cabinet Members have turned in their 
new luxury cars for smaller economical ones. President 
Nixon has been staying home on weekends ... all set- 
tirig good examples to conserve energy. But what 
about Henry Kissiner? Henry was seen last Sunday 
cruising around the» capital irj his luxury Lincoln Con- 
tienental. 






personals 



J 



To Whom II May Contern, ThU t* 
not «n md, in fact. UiU tptux it 
to be UMd for other purpoeea. Ii 
ia not here. 

L.B.K., Your bullen are ahowifiK. 
Merry Chriataiaa to ail my humble 
reader*, each and everyone of you. 

Prcaldeni N'byoaT Bah. humbuR. 

P*PK Kufut I.oves you. 

Wanted: ParucipanU lor acamput 

wide tnowbali HuhL Meet at the 

flaicpolet ThurKlky. 

8cro«ce i« aiive and well and work- 

ineaitheWHITK riouw 

CoRacrve (m with your dale*! Park 

It'!!! 

To tke trnU ofthe riarbiiwer: There 
U no place tor tcx in- your ofllce, 
»o make one. 

»eb«! Last ntcht was SwokmI beau 
tifol niKhl I have ever had. Ai^y. 
Avoid Ike Holiday lUak reserve 
your apac*. now, Rcalful Acre ( cm 
e»ery 

To WkoM It May Concern: Some 
people never crow up. 
IgMiraiic* ia Actloa. evjry TUt*. 
day and Thuraday. all day room 
A369. 

Pmm: Forael about me. aomewherc 
in thta world there It aomeone more 
dcaervine of your attentlona. K.K. 
D«v« Come and ■« It Carol. 
Georsc. riappy 21*1 you devil 
you. The Gaiw al work. 
■ V««'ve read fhia far rouV* 
col a alrone slomach 
BSilMla »n nothlnn but a cover- 
up. 

■ok. You have ureal leir*. Jante. 

Tfce Vote* may be a quarter more. 

but ii't a bii (••«. 

The aiore people there are In the 

world, the tnon I want to iret off. 

Gary. May the aJcohol in yourtya- 

tem keep you protected to 50 below. 

Thaaka to .Si Jude for •er\-ke*ren> 

dered JBL 

Frank B.. Your rertpe for ptna 

• an dellciou* The only Ihinji ia 

Ihdi now I don't know how to 

make it. 

Claralyn and Bob. Concralula- 

li«»n» lo two beautiful people. I.uck 

to ihe future. 

Dear .Sieve HA.. I aure wouM like 

lo get to knn% you l.el me know If 

you feel the name way. I'am < 

I.RK.Hurn baby burn. Burt. 

B. H. What aboul Ihe other ael of 

oenalive*'' The (.«id 

Barb. I like Jour style. I like your 

face, and per»onaHty. Pleaae think 

about who is wrilinR thi». 

Guy*. For the perfect dale, call 

Kon. 

People think that I am crude and 

dioKustinR. should only look In Ihe 

mirror lo see thai I am only a 

refletllon of themsrif. 

Life l« like a fine wine, if you are 

willinR to Rain Ihe knowledge -brc. 

then you become a vintaRc, If not. 

you remain a weekold vineRar 




i.r' 



-f 



pages 



WF 



H/IRBiNGER 



December tO, 1973 



December 10, 1973 



«H>1RBINGER 



page 9 




mtm 



m^tm 



^il\y 



I 



MAKES THE 
DIFFERENCE 



Ciiirif in for u Frr* demonirtra- 
liiin of Ihiii bruml nrw ciincriil in 
Mcnit Hair Rt'iiliuvnu-nt. In out- 
kiltinK wi- (un malrh your hair 
t olor, tilrnd. sha|H- St nlyle it ri|{ht 
ia Midi v»ur omii hair. 

From: $I(>.(MI 



gHORT HAIR* MILITARY WIGS 

aptirovitl by Army R«m>rvr». 
From: $25.(N) 



usiiiiitt statM » wii Mir tins 

Imse er Eaii 

ly w Dovn St 
Affvi^iofi Hv^QfiH, 3t4-05^0 



CONSIDER 

ROSARY 



MAX)R DEPARTMENTS DIVISIONAL MAJORS 


Amcf icM* Studies 


Biology - Chemistry 


Art 


■ifH! Arts 


Biorogy 


hfumanities 


Chfffnistry Modern ForeKin L»ngu»qn 


Communication Arts and Social Science 


Science* 




Economics and Buvincss 




tcorwrnnrs OTHER DEPARTMENTS 


Business Administration 


■ 


Accounting Education 


English 


Full Teacher Certification 


Writing Program 


Couries in Special Educa 


English Education Program 


(ton Learnir>g Disabilities 


Literature Program Geographv and Geology 


Pre Graduate P»o<r*m Health and Physical Education 


FrerKh Linguistics 


German Physics 


History 1 


Religious Studies 


Home Economics 


Russian 


Foods ami Nutrition 




Home Ecurwmics Education 1 


!>rp Law 


Gei>er^l Home Economics 


F>reMed 


Clothing dixi lex tiles 




Italian 


Four Year B A M A Program 


MatherT>atics 




Music 




Bachelor of Arts 
Bachelor of Music 


ROSARY 


Bachelor of Music Education 
Philosophy 


COLLEGE 


Political ScierKe 


7900 W Division Street 


Psychology • 


River Forest, III 60305 


Sociology 




Spanish and Port<>guese 


4 



Rosary College offers a Junior Year Abroad in Fnbourq, 
Swit/e^larxl, a Semester in London, and a Graduate School 
of Fine Arts in Florence Italy The Graduate School of 
Library Science is on the River Forest campus 

cotOf iivf OMoeorr c*Meut/KNOt*ntMifs loans «*omii stuot ritncii»Ms 

Rosary College 

Director of Admissions 

7900 W Division St., River Forest, III 60305 

Phone (3121 Fo 9-6320 

Send information to. 

Name 

Address , * 

City 



State 



Zip 



/Nirs/c Dept. to present Christmas program 



/ / 



By HEIDI JOHNSON 

The Harper College Music 
Department will present a 
concert. Dec. 11. in the Col- 
lege Center The Concert 
Choir and Came rata Singers 
will present the ' Christ - 
masy" part of the program, 
with the Wind Ensemble and 
Jazz band addinp a variety 
of numbers to the program 

The Concert Choir, under 
the direction of Mr Jerry 
Davidson. will perform a 
rarely heard work by En- 
glish Renaissance composer 
William Byrd, Sing Joy- 
fully." Other Christmas 
numbers include ' Hodie 
Christus Natus Est ". both 
in Gregorian chant and by 
the contemporary French 
composer Francis Poulenc. 
and two Russian numbers. 
The Sleigh and Carol 
of the Bells" They will 
also sing the English carol, 
"Masters in this Hall ". and 
a new work by Merrills Le- 
wis. "Christmas Time at the 
Pilgrim Inn '. Itisarraiti««;d 
for choir, flute, orchestra, 
bells, finger cymbals, tfi 
tambourine and sleigh 
It has been set to a 
by Elizabeth Goudge 
Soloists are soprano 
Diane Meyners and tenor 
Stephen Burch 

The Camerata Singers 
under the direction of Mr 
Willard Thomen. will per 
form carols from four Eu- 
ropean countries. Their 
program includes the tra- 



angle. 

bells 

poem 



J. SVOJODA SON$ 



\Miar« young man 
find brands Hiay 
know: 




thvltond 

Fully las^loned crewoacli 
pullover Irom England In 
striking new colours created by 
Alan Pain* $22 





The Concert Choir, under the direction of Mr. Davld- 
fion, will perform a variety of numbers. 

(Photo by Chuck Zemeslte) 



dltional German "Psalllte". 
three French carols: the 
Bas Quercy carol. "Sing 
We Noel Once More", ar- 
ranged by David Stanley 
Smith; ""Le Sommeil de 
I 'Enfant Jesus'". byGevaert. 
and the traditional French 
carol for the hearth. "I hear- 
Along Our Street' ".arranged 
by Hugh MacKinnon They 
will also sing the English 
"Liran Llram ".by 16thcen 
tury composer Thomas Mor- 
ley. and The Holly and the 
Ivy", arranged by Rutland 
Boughtor.. 

boprano Carolyn Larson of 
Gleixoe will be the soloist 
for "The Carol of the 
Birds", and James Hartman 
of Palatine will be the tenor 
soloist In "Hacie B«Men va 
un Burrico ■. 

The Wind Ensemble, under 
the direction of Dr Robert 
Tlllostson. will perform 
"Overture to Candidc . 



from the musical 'Can- 
dide", by Leonard Bern- 
stein, arranged for band by 
Walter Beeler. and "Sym- 
phonic Suite'". by Clifton 
Williams, which Is In five 
movements 

The straight ahead jazz 
arrangentent of A Little Mi- 
nor Booze"', by Willie Mai 
den. from the Stan Kenton 
Library. Is among one of the 
numbers to be played by the 
Jazz band, also directed by 
Dr Tillolson Other num- 
bers include "All Toge- 
ther", in an up^4empo swing 
style and "Real George ". 
a rock style, both by Kim 
Richmond. and Moms 
Mad", a samt>a. by Mike 
Barone. 

The concert is at 8p.ftt . 
and the public is invited to 
attend There will be no 
admission charge Merry 

Christmas' 



WHCM WANTS YOU 




ENGINEERS AND DISK JOCKCYS NEEDED. 
WHAT V4E OFFER CAN SUIT YOUR INTERESTS. 
STOP AT THE RADIO ST/^TION A.339 OR CALL 
EXT. 237. 




Jr&Miss 
Sizes 

Moderate 
PRICES 



4..DUNcr, luncheon 

ARiiMO^ DM HEIGH", III-—: ^/'%cKi#^n 

BARBARA CARTER IV^OUIV-III 

41V 4428 MODELS WANTED SHOWS 

".-..;.;; ;;.";.Ci Port Time 



GILENQ4? 
OFEI/^NrS 

On Campus — 
Harper College Band & Choir 'Concert, Dec. 11, 

8 p.m.. Lounge, free. 
"The Bicycle Thief, Dec. 11. 12:15 p.m.. E-106, free 

with I.D. 
"Migrant", a documentary by Chet Huntley, presented 

by the Harper Farm Workers Association, Dec. 11, 

12:15 p.m., D-237. 
Campus Television features "Hog Dog Skiing", Dec. 

11 & 12. 
Ceramics Sale In the second bay of the cafeteria, Dec. 

12. from 11^ a.m. till 1:30 p.m. 
STUDENT- FACULTY CHRISTMAS PARTY. Dec. 14, 

in the Lounge, 1-4 p.m. 
Bill Quateman Concert, Jan. 4 in the College Center 

Lounge, $1 with I.D. See Student Activities for ad- 
vance ticket sales. 
Faculty Senate mtg., Thurs., Dec. 13, D-I25 at 12:45. 

Muflic — 

Edmonds and Curley, comedy and folk singing, at 
Triton College. Thursday, Dec. 13, 2 p.m. Admis- 
sion free. , • . , 

Blue Oyster Cult. Dec. 14, Auditorium, 922-21 10. 

Handel's MESSIAH, Dec. 18 and 19. Orchestra Hall. 

Lou Reed. Dec. 22. Auditorium. 922-2110. 

Sha Na Na, Dec. 27-31. Auditorium. 922-2110. 



ANY .STIMIKNT WHO TLA.N.S lO I'AKrUII'Alh l.\ M'Kl.Nt. 
TRACK SHOULD BK SURK TO READ THE TRACK INKORMA 
TION WHICH IS POSTED IN THE ATHLETIC OFFICE F 345. 
INFORMATION PROVinED DEALS WITH ELIGIBILITY. PRAC- 
TICE TIMES, AND INDCK)R/Ol'TDOOR MEET.S. PLF.ASE CON 
TACT BOB NOLAN F 34.5 IF YOf HAVE ANY QIESTIONS 



Levi^ 




all¥re 
csarry* 



\v/i 



Over 4 tons per store 
Including Levis for gaH 
Levi s Sfa-Prest pants 
It s the world s greatest 
selection It s yours 




Millbrook (Golf Milt) 
NileH. ill. 967-.'Y.')9f> 




.Voif thftt you 

have your 

cars pierced . . . 

C*ot a FRI'^K pair of 

I IK iiiorecd c^arring's 
Bv joining our Farrinj* C lub! 

After you pnrrhase ."j pair, ne fii\«' 
v«MI a KHKK pair f lh« «»rrai:e prirp of the 
.'» pair pun haM-.n. Why not piill liou ■;• 



xjumU^^J^^ 



JEWELERS 

s,., n , n,l»,-».n'frfmr»«»«lrff»«l/>"-1''" *-ri" 1'>IT 

Dunton & ( ampbcll. Dow nlou n Arlincton fkighls 



Philosopliy Dept. states ptiilosophy 



Am I free to choose, or 
is my life determitied by 
forces over which I have ro 
control? 

Are there values and ob- 
ligations which are true and 
binding for all cultures and 
Individuals? 

Is there a God? How can 
I icnow for sure? 

Can I Imow anything with 
certainty, or is it all a mat- 
ter of opinion and belief? 

What is the "good life"? 

How can Idistinguishtrith 
from falsehood"' 

These and other similar 
questions are the Idnds of 
things that the Harper Phi- 
losophy Department Is In- 
terested In discussing 
There are noeasy answers- - 
if any at all- -tosuchquerles 
The value of philosophy lies 
in raising questions not In 
giving answers. The mind 
can be enlarged only byhav- 
ing its common sense (and 
often prejudiced) beliefs 
challenged. 

In thinking about regis- 
tration consider 

Introductloa to Philosophy 
-basic Investigation of the 
problems of luiowledge. 
value, and reality. No pre- 
requisites. 

Logic- -formal reasoning, 
language meaning, deduc 
tion. Induction and fallacy 
No prerequisites NOTE 
Many career programs find 
that a course in formal lo- 
gic Is relevant to skills In 
programming, design, cir- 
cuitry, flow -charting, and 
control technology 

Ethics Problems of va- 
lue and conduct Contem- 
porary moral problems as 



RESEARCH 



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JR. CHEMISTS & 
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Positions available in 

— Paints 

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and many other areas. 

Chemical Search is an 
organization staffed by 
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counselors to help recenV 
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their search for job 
opportunities. 

Our service is free and we 
have helped many Harper 
alumni. CaU (312) 345-6960 

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war, violence, sex, drugs, 
racism, crime, and punish- 
ment. 
' Religions of the World - 



Study of selected major re- 
ligions: Buddhism. Hin- 
duism. Judaism. Islam, and 
Christianity. 



PLANS CHANGE? 

CONSIDER METROPOLITAN - - 



• ACCOUNTING 

• ADMINISTRATION 

• BOOKKEEPING 

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• AOM. ASSISTANT 

• EXEC. SECRETARY 

• LEGAL SECRETARY 

• MEDICAL TRANS. 



FINANCIAL AID AVAILABLE 
FREE X)B PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE 




L. ^•>_^ ___..• Coma In. Wriit or Call.- 



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Born INDUSTRIES Arlington Heights. 



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AKCHITECTAND ENGINEERING 
AND COMMERCIAL ART MATERIALS 



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, tLj; 



/^ 




page 10 



M 



H/4RBINGER 



^^ 



v^ 



fndritk nd MajrAfrsf nppthfd t§ Awards C§mmim9 



December 10. 1973 



December 10, 1973 



T£ 



H/1RBINGER 



- t 



Page 11 



Harper College students 
have been named to a com- 
mittee that will help admi- 
nister the 1973-74 Student 
Achievement Recognition 
laifiched earlier this month 
at the school's campus in 
Palatine 

Named to the committee 
were Bob Hayhurst. Student 
Seante president, Elk Grove, 
and Larry Fredrick, film 
chairman, Mount Prospect 
The two students wereap - 
pointed by Carrell Evans, 
coordinator of the awards 
program for Harper College. 
The primary function of the 
committee will be to act as 
a liaison among students, 
college faculty, and Judges. 
The Student Achievement 
Recognition Program aims 
to focus more public atten- 
tion on the IlUnois com- 
munity college system by 
giving local, regional, and 
statewide recognition to de- 
serving students and their 
colleges. 

Condnental Bar* of Chi- 
cago is sponsoring and ad- 
ministering the program for 
the fifth successive year and 
is providing more than $14, 
000 In award money 

The Harper student com- 
mittee win also help super- 
vise the final judgingprocess 



next February when two Har- 
per students, one man and 
one woman, will be chosen 
as winners of the campus 
competition. Each winner 
will receive $100 and a cer- 
tificate of merit. 

In March, the two campus 
winners will compete for 
$250 cash awards in one of 
six district competitions 
with winners from the other 
46 community colleges in Il- 
linois One man and one 
Woman will be chosen from 
each of the sb( districts to 
compete in the state finals 
in April for two $1,000 cash 
awards. 

This is not a scholarship 
p rografti . according to Roger 
E. Anderson, Continental 
Bank's chairman of the 




board. "Rather," he noted, 
"it is designed to recog- 
nize students who have made 
noteworthy achievement to- 
ward their career goals and 
have demonstrated leader- 
ship qualities through par- 
ticipation in campus and 
community activities." 

Entry applications, avail- 
able at the Financial Aids 
Office, Room A364 on the 
Harper campus, will be ac- 
cepted unUl Jan. 28. 1974. Robert Hayhurst (above) and Larry Fiedrich (below) 
They should be submitted to were recently appointed to Award* Committee 
the same office. - 

To be eligib>e, students 

must be in gooa academic 

standing, and enrolled in the 

community college with nine 

semester hours completed 

by Jan 28. 



ACADEMIC ADVISING SCHEDULE 
SPRING SEMESTER 1974 



Registration Dates 
Thursday, December 13, 9-12 noon 

1-3 
Wednesday, January 9, 9-12 noon 

1-3 
Thursday. January 10. 9-12 noon 

1-3 

Students who are advised on these dates may process 
their schedules at the computer stations on December 
14th or January 1 1th. 



College Center 
College Center 
College Center 




International students plan activities 



PANTS FOR / 
HIM & HER 




Evening Students 
Wednesday. January 9. 5:30-8:30 



College Center 



Repr«ten(ativ« needed! Earn 1200.00 plus 
eoch semester with only a imw hours work 
at the beginning of the semester. 
INTERNATIONAL MARKETING SERVICE, 
519 Glenrock Ave., Suite 203, 
Los Ang»l«t, California 90024 




STUDIMTS with HARPER ID 

20% OFF 
Automotive parts & supplies 

PALATINE AUTOMOTIVE 

546 E. Northwest Hiway 
Palatine. III. 60067 

Phone : 358 2550 



Hours 

MON FRI. 

8 a.m. - 9 p.m. 

SAT. 

8 a.m. • 4 p.m. 

SUN. 

9 - 12am 




By HEIDI JOHNSON 

Are you interested in food? 
■ or soccer? These topics, 
plus others, will be discus 
sed at the International €tu- 
dents Association Meeting. 
Dec 12. at 12noon. A241 A 
The Intepnational Students 
meeting will be open to any- 
one, and they are going to 
plan activities for Christmas 
and the coming year Some 
of the topics to be discus- 
Jed are soccer and an In- 
ternational Dinner Students 
interested In working on the 
dinner would contribute re- 
cipes from different coun- 
tries and woric together with 
the Food Service Executive 
Association inpresentingthe 
dinner The meeting will 
be open for suggestions for 
other activities for the year 
Allhoigh the association 
is a relatively new organ - 
president Victor Cabrera 
hopes it will continue to 
grow and serve an important 



cultural function at Harper 
Students from the sixteen 
countries represented at 
Harper have a chance to get 
toother, share experiences 
and lessen the cultural gap, 
created mainly by language. 
The association is open to 
all students, and those taking 
a foreign language or who 
are Interested in learning 
more about different cul- 
tures, are especially invited 
"to attend the meetings. The 
association hopes tohelp de- 
velop better understanding of 
each others cultures and 
T'-'c c3mmunication be- 
tween Harper students and 
Harper exchange students. 

The association members' 
communication efforts and 
cultural enrichment does not 
stop outside their meetings 
They often have "informal" 
meetings, that is. rap ses- 
sions, in the cafeteria In- 
terested students are wel- 
come to join them 



Woman'i StsM 5te 18 
Man's Siui 28 to 42 Waitt 
JnMami. 28ln.to36In. 

BOYS SIZEB 6 to 18 



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641 West Colfax Ave. Palatine, III. 60067 
Phone- 991 -2240 Hours- Daily 8:30-5:00 , Sat. 9-1 

Parts & Arcessories for all Foreign Care 
ENGUSH JAPANESE 
^GERMAN FRENCH ITAUAN 

EXHAUST- BRAKES- IGNITION- CLUTCH 
- ENGINE- SUSPENSION 



IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMEM 
[Students have up to December 2l8t to withdraw 

classes! 



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UNUCUM. CLOtlLVMAN TtM OeMON.k M« 

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luaoN Tuc coiMc Aiao <« mtuctio 

wru 4 OMt MtLKMCTMSN, KM n«a CMOIWN 




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Photo of the week 





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'"ttUrCM MID UUtMMCOMIUMMi. 
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A ni'c* place to 
meet your 
Christmas presents 

. Indoor Plants 
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Baldwin 

Palatine 





991- 
1.190 



COUNTrrSiDt WAl, 



mmm 



"The only 
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in the 
Suburbs! 

MONDAY NIGHT roOfRAII.- 
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Tradtliunal Folk Muik rvrry niicht eiir<i>l MoA 



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• FOOSBALL 

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DRINK 1/2 PRUK WITH .\l> 
double DRINKS SlOfl' 



PHONE 
358-8444 

55 N. Bothwell 
Palatine 



Photo by Mike Wellman 

XT 



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327 N. NORTHWEST HWY. 358-1229 
FLEETWOOD SHOPPING CENTER PALATINE 



THE FAMILY PANTS STORE 



FLARES & DRESS & WORK PANTS SIZE 28-50 
:COUf>OM====a 29.000 pairs OF PANTS IN STOCK 



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With famous 
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baggies; to skinny 
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well bred 
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BAGGIES 
from $5.95 



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6 00 SUN. 1 ? 00 ■ 



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pafle 12 



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H/«?BINGER 



Nar^r r»fr»$»tt»d at m»M U.H. C*Mctf 



The most beneficial edu- 
cational experience we've 
ever had," was the comment 
from the three Harper stu- 
dents parHnipating in the 
MODEL UN Security Coun- 
cil held at Duquesne Univer- 
sity in Pittsburgh 

The meetings began 
Thursday, November 29 and 
lasted through Saturday Dec 
1 The Student Senate sent 
two representatives, Tom 
Trunda and StaceyBueschel, 
they also sponsored one stu- 
dent from Ms Waites Poli- 
tical Science class. Maryln 
Watts 

As the delegation of Pa- 
nama, the three represented 
Harper efficiently and were 



the only delegation having » 
resolution passed, for which 
they received a standing o- 
vation from the entire coun- 
cil. 

Awarded theParlimentar- 
ian Award, the three felt that 
everyone can learn a great 
deal by attendance at such 
meetings. 

■Worldng as a delegation, 
a total init was the most 
important factorinthe meet- 
ings," slated Ms Bueschel 
Tom Trunda fell that it 
■ strengthened my Imowledge 
of parlimentary procedure, 
and the execution of major 
points." Marlyn concluded 
with this statement, "a 
truly dynamic experience " 



II 



Watch out for 
The Bicycle Thief" 



I Before you buy 

Auto Insiirtance 
Call 495-0648 

• Good student discount * Motorcycles oil CC's 
' Driver training credit ' Finondol Responsibility 

♦ 20^ Savings *or faculty 

Brodley/Brodtey Agency Insu/ance Inc. 



Vittoria De Sicas most 
well -Known film. The Bi- 
cycle Thief, will be shown 
Dec. 11 in E-106. at 12 15 
P m. It is the story of a 
poor married man. his son 
and a bicycle whichprovides 
their livelihood. Just when 
the bicycle is needed for a 
long-sought job. it is stolen. 
Scene after scene reveals the 
bitter irony of this man and 
his son, buffeted by an in- 
different world as they 
search for the bicycle 

The film was based on a 
novel by Lolgi Bartollnl, with 
the screenplay by Cesare 
Zavattinl Starring Lam 
berto Maggiorani and Enzo 
Staiola, the film has won se- 
veral awards as best foreign 
film. There is no admis- 
sion charge. 



December 10. 1973 



Publication Schedule: 
The following is the Spring 
publicatioh schedule of the 
Harbinger. Information lor 
placing ads can be obtain- 
ed by calling the Business 
Department. 397-3000, exL 
272. 

Issue Publication Copy 
No. Date Deadline 

-Final - 12 NOON for ALL 
dates 
U Jan. 9 Jan. . 7 



lb 
16 

17 

18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 



Jan. 
Feb. 



2tt 

4 



Jan. 
Jan. 



18 
25 



Feb. 12 Feb. 1 



Feb. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Apr. 
Apr. 
May 
May 



25 
4 
11 
18 
25 
8 

29 
6 

13 



Feb. 

Feb. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 



15 
22 
1 
8 
15 
29 



May 20 



Apr. 19 
Apr. 26 
May 3 
May 10 



L„ E„ KIEL 



I Cla 



aeifirde 



^f«*t f*>*«u* %«.^f^v« 4*^ 4 



». V^~ #«** •««»«. A V^'^Hr. «*H V.^ t 







f»r that friend thai 



fgarr »wu ifw nhirt of*" f 

hin ru:k i 

hit Him I 

BYTHISIATOFl 
TOnn.PANTS \ 



iGuys 



Vm It S»ia" 
M liana 




I-O.I at Schoul. Tuw. 1 1/3, 
•mall while box wlih denial 
in»irumento. If fpMnd pleaac 
return lo harblnfcer offke 
HIdK ,\ .167. Reward. 

1064 Pontlac Cat fur Sale 

V/S. P/B winierixed w/'»now». 
Mechanically sound. 
yUkinii S350.00 
Coniari Joe 537-1735. 

1967 Hunda SOS" 

Hardly uwd. 10-tpccd i 

Belgian Racer. Flaming red 

Gary Ext 272 (after 12 00> 

or272-4I,M(Suj>day») 

HEATH KIT 

Vacuum tube, voltage meler 

FOR SAI.K. Model .\o. IM-2(f 

(on in 1970- S72.60. 

W(U tell for S50.00 

Meaaures AC. t)CT. DC-. & Ohmi 

Call Martin Fox al 42«-l30e 

(MUST lell need money) 

( Needi tube for AC 

will pay the cortL 

Wanted 

2 end table* and cpcklail tables, 
dk. wood preferred, under $15 ear 
CaU .197-34U after 4.30 p.m. 



Bed, matreas. 
Full size. $15. 



■prings. and frame 
Call 882-4711. 



m^tf>***f ♦^^awniyd*^ 



57 H •OTMWtll - WIATINE 

(NIXT TO OUtTV NClllfS WISH PUB) 

DOWNTOWN PALATINE 

PHONE 358-2886 



N«w Furtntture For Sale 
Original 

'^Viginal 



•"** ^* * *^f **^ .«** •»«.* «<n* .H^*. 



*liii>llwif><;(iaftiftia<j»^iMiivteTtSte 



I.owry Organ 

Theateretle S2.I00. 

King .Si2c Bed 

* Fool Bench 

<'>k. (;old WIvetl 6(K) 

Burnt Orange Sofa 4()0 

2 (hairs 

Dk. Cold ViK,! 



I'rice Asking 



51. .300 



3(»0. 
200. 



I 7.5 en. ea fio 



V.I- 



'70 Capri 

23(K) cc \'-6 racing engine 
four on the floor 
deluxe Kuropcan styling 
looks and runs (ireat! 
Oood ga.s mileage 
Sia'JO.OOor best offer 
Call 358-6690 

TOCOODHOMK 
9 month old female samoyed 
AKC registered w/ papers 
and in the BKST of health. 



Oood w/ children. 
Needs someone al home lo 
take care of here 
INQIMRK: After «„.. 
Tues. thru Sat .•;•»*. iiH3 

STUDENTS TIlANsFKKRlNf; 

fo Northern University. 

I-ive off Campus in a 

quiel. friendly Frat. House 

lanuary May: $.300.00 

Call (815) 756-9625 or 

Vinil at 1020 Hillcresl. DeKalb. 



2 Cigarette 1 ablet 
Marble Tops & 
(lold Pedestals 
1 Lamp Tall 
Walnut 



Why is it that every time 
a guy takes the Ume to ask 
out a girl, she will half of 
the time make up some feeble 
excuse along the lines of. 
"I already have a b(>y- 
frlend. " or "I have to go 
visit my grandparents ■' 

Answers like these, only 
are a front for the real 
statement. 'God. why don't 
y<xi stop asking me out? " 
— If a person such as my- 
self takes it upon himself 
to be nice to a member of 
the fairer sex. the person 
who is the object of this 
attention quite often takes 
this to mean that I am In- 
terested in her body Quite 
often nothing could be further 
from the truth 

When I offer to give a per- 
son a ride home, it is more 
than likely that I will hear 
that female give me some 
reason why it is easier for 
her to abscound to the tele- 
phone, and call her parents, 
and make them come out to 
pick her up. 

It makes no difference if 
this girl lives on the route 
■*hat I take home, it is still 
easier for her to call the 
folks 

It would appear to the as- 
tute observer that the girl 
Is either none to bright, or 
that the girl is a poor fibber 
Aside from beingdiscour 
teous, this type of action on 
the part of the females of 
this society lead lo the con- 
clusion that the males are 
morons for continuing to al- 
low this type of activity to 
persist 

However, it is simply a 
matter erf the males being 
too polite to call the girl on 
this lactic, so they continue 
to use it. even thcxigh it is 
dated. 

I personally consider it a 
slanderous insult to my in- 
telligence to believe such a 
line as "I have to go lo the 
dentist " or 'I thir* I'm 
going to be sick on Friday " 



these little 
denials of 



The use of 
"ni€e. bit firm 
a social engagement, appear 
to be rought about by an 
attitude of the females that 
all guys are interested in 
is sex. and will go to any 
lengths to get it 

It is either this, or the 
attitude that the guy is lo(*- 
Ing for "love and ro- 
mance", instead of just a 
good time 

9oth of these piA forth the 
attitude that the female is 
something special In the eyes 
of the guy who is asking her 
out In other words, an eco 
trip 

When I ask a girl out for 
coffee, or offer to give her 
a ride home, that is exactly 
what I mean. Why do they 
have to read so much into 
that offer? 

What makes them think 
that I am in love with them, 
or I want to have passiorate 
sex with them? They should 
be so lucky. 



1 75. ea. ea. 75. 



175. 



75. 



Phone 5«|.1495. Ask for Monica 



< ombinalion Free/er Refriger^t,, 

■V«rsS75(«). C.Kkl able.emi 

«hle & ,„hie T.,,k 
SIS W* * S5 (M) 
9?>I 20.«-' 



Student blasts 

(From page 5) 

our business is to m ke up 
their minds for them " 

The senators name will 
remain anonymous, in he 
rernent hope he was stoned 
so as not to ruin the fu- 
ture brilliant career in 
politics he aspires to 

Tom Trunda carried the 
meeting well consideringthe 
short lime in which he had 
to be briefed on the pro- 
posals 

Mr Borelli. as usual gave 
good guidance and some 
poignant insights into pro- 
cedure. 

George Polales III 



S20.00 
respectively 




*** NOJKl *** 

We missed seeing many of you at Halloween, 
there are a large number of unique items 
available, so head over here for your CHRIST- 
MAS GIFTS (even if it's for yourself) 

PJ.'s THKK SHOP 

SANDHURST SHOPPING CENTER 392-5280 



I 



i 



December 10, 1973 



f€ 



H/1RBINGER 



Page13 



Program Board flexible to Student Body 



So you feel a little left 
out when it comes to plan- 
ning events around the cam- 
pus. Maybe you think that 
ycxj have a gcKxl idea as to 
something that you would like 
to see offeredaroundhereas 
a concert, lecture, film, or 
the like. 

Possibly ycxj feel that you 
would like to make one of 
your ideas a reality. If so. 
there is an organization on 
this campus which would en- 
joy hearing from you An 
organization which allho un- 
dersuffed. and at times 
overworked, attempts to put 
out the best, and most fea- 
sable program of events for 
the student bcxly to ei\j(^. 

This affore mentioned or- 
ganization is the program 
board. 

The Program Board con- 
sists of a president, four 
committees, an Adminis- 
trative assistant, and a Pu- 
blic Relations Assistant 

These people, along with 
the people who serve on the 
committees, decide the 
course which entertaining, 
and special activities will 
run They book groups, run 
th# coffee house, set up film 
schedules, lectures, and the 
like 

It is perhaps one of the 
most diverse organizations 
on this campus, in that there 

Clothing fashions 
subject of WWMM 

Fashion will be the subject 
of two radio broadcasts on 
"Focus: Northwest," a Har- 
per College panel show on 
WWMM, 92 7 on the FM 
dial 

Broadcasts are at 8am 
and 9 p.m. on Sundays during 
the school year. 

"Fashion History and 
Hemlines" is scheduled for 
Sunday. December 16 'Fa 
shion: Is Not for Clothing 
Only." the second segment, 
will be aired on December 
23. » 

Sue Braden, Wieboldfs fa- 
shion coordinator. and 
Sharon Carey, district fa- 
shion merchandiser for J C. 
Penney, will converse with 
moderator Josie Tomes of 
the Harper College Fashion 
Design Program 

Panel members were in 
agreement that the kooky " 
period in fashions is out. 
with both men and women 
seeking the more classic 
lock. They also agreed that 
dressing for one's lifestyle 
dictates fashion more than 
do the fashion designers 
themselves. 

Lifestyles proved lobe the 
main point of interest during 
the discussion on "Fashion 
Is Not for Clothing Only " 
With more entertaining being 
done in family rooms and 
kitchens, fashionhastakenlo 
the home in such items as 
pots, pans, towels, and table- 
cloths which have come alive 
with color and design 



schedule attempts tosatisify 
everyone, even those who 
don't put out any effort. 

Pam Varchelto^ President 
of Program Board, along 
with Pat Fitzgibbons. Ad- 
ministrative Assistant. Jill 
Abernalhy, Special Events 
Chairman, Film Chairman, 
compose the idea staff of 
Program Board, with Caro- 
lyn Gorr acting as the Pu- 
blic Relations Assistant ' 

There are two Chairman- 
ships on the board which are 
at this time vacant. They 
are the Concert, Lecture 
chairmanship, and Afternoon 
Activities 

Concert, Lecture Com- 
mittee, decMe^Nvhich groups 
will perform on campus, 
during the big concerts, 
these in the evening, and 
books lectures, afid speak- 
ers. Afternoon Activities, is 
the group which decides what 
events are to be held during 
the school day. such as the 
coffeehouse. 

The staff for these com- 
mittees is open to the stu- 
dent body, and anyone who 
wants to come in. and help, 
is more than welcome to 
Anyone would like to come 
in. and make a few sugges- 
tions, is also invited to speak 
their piece, but this at times 
creates a problem, in the 
words of Pam Varchetto. 



"There is probably out of 
eleven thousand people here, 
half who don't like it, ( the- 
activities planned) but whei 
asked lo help when ihey com- 
plain, they won't" 

If a person who has a 
special project that they 
would like to see Program 
Board uiulertake, and ihey 
are willing to help in the 
production of the project, 
gelling ihelr haixJs dirty with 
the work that is involved, 
the Program Board will give 
them all the help that they 
might need to make their 
idea a reality 

The Board is flexible 
enough to allow this They 
can change as the desires of 
the student b(xiy changes 

This flexibility is some 
thing that is hard to im- 
pUment here however, dueto 
the apparent lack of Interest 
by most members of the stu- 
dent body, and their general 
appathy towards Harper Col- 
lege, "Students here are 
very cold, it's hard to gel 
lo luiow other people. There 
is a lot to be gotten here 
at Harper" These feel- 
ings were on<^ again expres- 
sed by Pam Varchetlo 

So, if y(xi are looking for 
a place to go with your ideas, 
and express your desires, 
contact the Program Board 
in room A-336 




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Rean Larry Frvdrii-h. Front left lo right: Jill Abernathy, 
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■■ I \ 

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A 



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Page 14 



T€ 



H/RBINGER 



\ 



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December 10, 1973 



December 10. 1973 



T€ 



H/1RBINGER 



page 15 



(From page 2) 

explored many areas to de- 
termine the feasibility of 
' such an undertaking. The 
sheer time and logistics al- 
one are overwhelming. 

Computer - managed tea- 
ching is not an entirely new 
idea. Northwestern Univer- 
sity is in its second year 
of the project and it seems 
to be working quite well 
The computer system in use 
is called PLATO - IV The 
student terminal used is a 
small teld^ion screen with 
a custom designed type- 
writer keyboard The one 
drawback is price The ba- 
sic machine costs $6,000 
phis anywhere from a few 
hundred to a few thousand 
dollars in telephone charges 
Obtaining research grants 
and loans are probably the 
largest obstacles As anyone 
knows, money isn't the easi- 
est thing to get Money 
and material must be stud- 
ied to fit into a chematic' 
budgeted program that would 
produce the most beneficial 
effects while costs and man- 
power are kept to a safe 
minimum '^ 

In the Infancy of this pro 
gram, comparisons would 
have to be made of the pro 
gram in each fiekl of s|udy 
Comparing students within 
the school, between different 
schools and interpreting the 
results to make room for 
improvements would all be 
part of the program Pro- 
jections would be studied to 
employ the self paced sys- 
tem to all fiekJs of learning 
The planning, the hopes 
andspeculations of such a 



Computers 



program would possibly va- 
nish from sight if funds ecu Id 
not be obtained. This is 
a possibility that must be 
faced. If this were to be 
the course of events, an- 
other system, without the 
aid of computers must be 
heW in reserve. One al- 
ternative would be the useof 
proctors - responsible stu- 
dents who have already taken 
the course and received A 
grades- to monitor theindiv- 
idaul progress for each stu- 
dent in his group With the 
proctors assistance, a stu- 
dent can keep abreast of his 
progress by monitoring his 
weakness and strong points 
The proctor would suggest 
alternative or additional 
reading and study materkil | 
He would assist the student 
in determining how the stu- 
dent can best strengthen 
areas of low achievement on 
his tests. 



This relatively new ap- 
proach to teaching, while in 
its embryonic stagp. is now 
only scratching the surface 
of possibilities One can 
possibly see the day when 
self pacedteachingwill touch 
the lives of not only stu- 
dents, bu a vast segment 
society The process of 
education as we know it now 
has many shortcomings. Ad- 
mi tedly. the immediate costs 
of undertaking a project of 
this magnitude would be tre- 
mendous But one must be 
realistic enough to see be- 
yond the immediate costs, 
to perceive the enormous 
benefits that would bloseom 
from the proper implemen- 
tation and management of 
technology. 




A VW driver, after diNguining hin car an a snnwplow, 
drives on Hidewalk between C and D buildingH. Due to 
clever dinguiHe Public Safety waji fooled. 



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WINTER INTRMURAL 

ACTIVITIES 

FOR YOU 

If you are interested in the 
following activities: 
Programs Satarting Date 
Men 

Basketball league Nov. 

Billiards Jan. 

Table Tennis Jan. 

Co- Ed: 

Bowling Nov.-Feb. 

Ice Skating Jan. 

Women: 

Basketball Nov. 

Billiards Jan. 

Table Tennis Jan. 

Volleyball Feb. 

Rec.: 

Swim Party Feb. 

Please contact Coach 
Reams, Ext. 371. or come to 
F-345. 



(From page 3) 



Candidote views 



sonal feelings of the rep 
should be l^ft out of his re- 
presentation. That the Rep 
should relay the Ideas of the 
student body, and not the 
personal feelings of the In- 
dividual. 

For the evening students, 
Mclntyre statedthat he would 
establish hours that would 
allow them a chance to ex- 
press their desires, and post 
office hours, setting up a 
time and a place where he 
could be reached if the stu- 
dent has a good idea, and 
would like to express it to 
him 



'/^?&i^ 



PRE-REGISTRATION SCHEDULE 



December 1 4 
January 9 
January 11 



9 a.m.-12 
5:30 
9 a.m. - 12 



1 - 4 p.m. 
8:30 p.m. 
1-4 p.m. 



Fee Payment Schedule 
Those Registering on December 14 - By January 4 
Those Registering on Jan 9 & 1 1 by January 17 
Those Registering on January 9 & 11 - By January 17 



McGloughlin feels that es- 
tablishing office hours would 
not be that good of an idea, 
but would rather prefer using 
the individual approach. "1 
feel the best way to achieve 
optimum communication be- 
tween the students and the 
Board is to talk to a large 
enough group of students on 
a personal basis which nor 
mally connot be obtained by 
simply sitting in an office." 
This election is the direct 
result of the referendum last 
month where the student body 
decided that they would ra- 
ther elect this represen- 
tative than let the Student 
Senate decide who the per- 
son is to be. 

Voting will -1)6 in the 
Lounge from 9a.m.to5p m . 
and from 5 to 8 p.m. on the 
third floor of F Building 
Ballots will also be carried 
to the classrooms byintere- 
sted students 

Anyone interested in 
working during the elections 
as a poll judge, worker, or 
help in counting ballots, 
should contact the Student 
Activities Office A337. 



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^ 



Hawks bow to Lake County 



The Hawk Basketball team 
lost in it's first conference 
game to the Lake County 
Lancers, 74-66. 

With just under five min- 
utes of the game past, the 
Lancers locked like they 
would be easy victors, by 
jumping out to an 18 point 
lead. 



was all up hill from then on 
By the end of the half, the 
Hawks were able to narrow 
the gap down to a mere 
eight point deficit They 
went into the locker room 
trailing 38-30 

Late in the second half 
the Hawks were able to nar- 
row the gap even further, by 



The game for the Hawks making the score 61-57, this Heights. 



possibly due to the fact 
that during the second half, 
the Hawks were able towor- 
the ball inside to their big 
men. 

The next Hawk game is 
Tuesday. Dec 11, against the 
McHenry Community Col- 
lege team at the St Via- 
tors Gym in Arlington 




HOLIDAY 
BLESSINGS 

TO ONE AND ALL 

from the 
HARBINGER staff 



Puck Comments 




By DENNIS SOBOJ 

Right now. the team is 
close to selecting its start- 
ing players Our first con- 
ference game is against Jol- 
iet on Dec 15. 

Due to the fact that the 
team has not beenpronounc- 
ed varsity, organization has 
been slow Training and 
conditioning was limited to 
ice time only and with try- 
outs it was difficult 

Our improvements are 
physically well developed 
with the season. The entire 
team is very optimistic We 
definately feel we have tal- 
ent on the team and are ex- 
pecting and exciting season 
with regionals definitely in 
mind. 



Line Up 
for Game Against 
LoyolH 

1st Line: LW. Tom Langer; 

L. Kevin Bowens; RW. 

Steve iiird. 
2nd Line: LW, Dennis So- 

bot; L, John Rebora, RW, 

Jim Schneider. 
3rd Line: LW. Jody Kosev: 

L, Terry Lee; RW. Ter 

ry Devlto. 

Ist: LD. Kevin Llo; RD, 

R«>b Heatley. 
2nd: LD. Nick Pauly; RD. 

Marc Walk; Tom Black 

(5th Defenseman) 
Goal: Ist. Mark Laslin; 2nd 

Carl DeUa. 




Cross Con Jifjf Hnishes with 7 A dual recorrf 



Finishing with a final dual 
meet record of 7 - 1, the 
Harper cross-country team 
did "possibly better than 
expected." according to 
their coach. Bob Nolan 

During the season, they 
extended their dual meet vic- 
tory string to 30 straight be- 
fore losing to the College of 
DuPage. 28-31 The string 
had covered four seasons, 
dating back to the end of the 
1970 campaign. 

The Ha^ks finished in a 
three-way tie with Triton and 
Oakton in the final Skyway 
Conference standings They 
were in first place going 



into the Skyway meet, bil lost 
to both Triton and Oataon in 
that meet 

Hawk Mike DeLaBruerer 
(Crystal Lake) repec^ed as 
individual Conference meet 
champion with a four -mile 
tiise of 20 45 6 Another 
Hawk. Tom Path from Bar - 
rington High School, finished 
in third place, with a timeof 
21 02 

The Hawks finishedfifth in 
Region IV competition out 
of 20 teams 

DeLaBruerer. Path, and 
John Jones (Hersey) qualif- 
ied to compete in the nat- 
ional meet on November 10 



In that meet. DeLaBruere 
finished in the number 42 
spot out of a field of over 
370 runners 

The competition was a lot 
tougher this year than in the 
past, according to Nolan. 

"We did pretty good with 
only one returning letterman 
on the team." said Nolan, 
"but that only means that 
we'll have four at our top 
five runners back again next 
year. We've never had that 
luxury before " 




ifflfrro Christmas 5 
and Jiappy 2 

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2 MEN 

Kitchen & Food 
between II I 1:30 
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CALL 

Mr. Casey 

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(Ht'JSS. ihr rliiosir ){iiiii<- of •>lrHlfg>. 
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HHnd«>om«' IpHiher-gniinfd book- 
•ihrlf THM* fi"Hliire«» fiill-<-f»lor repni- 
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DARKENS 



FOR. 



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Page 16 



T€ 



H>1?BINGER 



December 10. 1973 



Young mat team toughening up 



t 



Say "I love you" 

with more love 

than money. 




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ForjustSM,lnf»ci. 
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appreciate two rules every 
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Firat, m* rtever high presaur*. We 
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carefully Look at only those 
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category Askasmanyquesttonsas 
you like We II give you all the 
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Secoftd. aince 1 91 our policy of 
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With only six sophomores 
back fromlast year, the Har- 
per Hawk wrestling team will 
be basically a freshman unit 
when the season gets under 
way in late November. 

"We've got a tough sche- 
dule, so we'll get knocked 
around a little bit. But that's 
all a part ot the sport," 
said coach Ron Bessemer. 

The six returning wrest- 
lers are Al Gordon (126), 
Bernie Kleiman (118). Tom 
DalCompo and GaryThacker 
(134), and Steve Glasder and 
Ron Vylasek (177 or 190) 

Gordon, who prepped at 
Conant High School, won the 
Region IV tournament last 
year and competed in the 



nationals. 

"Usually, we have a- 50 -50 
split between freshmen and 
sophomores," explained 

Bessemer. "In this way, 
I can pair them off and use 
the sophomores as a teach- 
ing aid. But because of the 
small number of sophomores 
this year, the progress of the 
team has been slower. It 
takes longer to get going." 

The Hawks have been 
working on takedowns, es- 
capes, and pinning in their 
pre-season practices. 

"My philosophy is that a 
wrestler should be able to 
take his opponent down and 
also get away from him," 
Bessemer said. 'Also, when 






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1973 ■ -74 




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a wrestler is on tip of an 
opponent he should try to 
turn him over for the pin 
We won a lot of meets 
because of pins last year ' 
Techniques and condition- 
ing have also been a part of 
the program to get the Hawks 
prepared for 'iie upcoming 
season 

'These two things prevent 
injury. If a wrestler knows 
the correct techniques and is 
in good physical condition, 
he has a greater chance of 
escaping injury. " Bessemer 
explained. 

With 15 years experience 
in wrestling. Bessemer is 
somewhat of an expert on the 
sport. He competed in high 
school and in the Army, and 
he's coached high school. 
Army, and collegiate wrest- 
lers. He's wrestledall three 
styles - - collegiate, free- 
style, and Greco - so he 
knows their differences and 
similarities 

"Once I started coaching 
full time. I quit competing 
as a wrestler myself I 
did this because I felt I 
couldn t give 100 percent to 
both things." Bessember 
said 

The Ha^ks first meet will 
be against Lake County on 
Wednesday. Nov 28 It will 
be a home meet at Eisen- 
hower Junior High School in 
Hoffman Estates, where all 
home meets will t>e held. 
Even though the Hawks are 
young, their coach feels that 
they possess a good attitude 
and a lot of enthusiasm. 
Tm really looking for 
ward to this season It s 
going to be rough, bu we 
should be respectable by the 
end of the year. ' said Bes- 
semer. "Any school we 
wrestle will know they were 
in a battle ' 

Ski trips 

SKIERS there is still time 
to sign up for some holiday 
skiing over Christmas vaca- 
tion or semester break 

The Spread Eagle Ski Club 
is going to Squaw Valley on 
December 16 23 The trip 
will cost $274 and there is 
still some space available 
Applications canbepickedup 
in the Student Activities Of- 
fice 

The next trip will be to 
Afton Alps. Minn from De- 
cember 27 to the .31 This 
trip will include 4 days of 
skiing. 4 nights lodging, and 4 
breakfasts all for only $55 
The money for this trip is 
due December 14 

The ski club is going to 
Steamboat. Colo for semes- 
ter break Thistripwillcost 
$236 for January 19 to the 26 
The money for this trip is 
due on December 19 

ForTnore information and 
to sign up for any of these 
trips come to the Student 
Activities Office. A- 336 
today. 



L 



( ■ 



/ 



\ 



4 



7 ' 



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\ 



H/4RBINGER 

William Rainey Harper College. Algonquin and Roselle Roads, Palatine, Illinois 60067, 312-397-3000 



Vol. 7, No. 13 



January 7. 1974 



losf efectfoff tk; rini'M ekition Wedaesdaff Jm. 9 

McGlothlin in Student Rep. run-off 



This interview was con- 
ducted by Lawrence R Kiel 
on the 20th of December, 
1973. The questions asked by 
Kiel are in Capitals, and 
Mr. McGlothlin's replies 
are In standard type. 

WHAT DO YOU FEEL 
YOUR QUALIFICATIONS 
ARE FOR THIS POSITION? 

"I believe my most Im- 
portant qualification is that 
I am a student at Harper 
College, uninvolved, or 
should I say without any 
political rituals instilled into 
me. whether from the Student 
Senate or any political or- 
ganization I have been work- 
ing with. I believe I could 
represent the rest of the stu - 
dents, some 1,300 at Harper 
College, to the board in this 
position which has never 
been available until this date. 

"In previous jobs 1 have 
held I was responsible for 
hiring nearly 100 students on 
a full or part time basis, 
and working either sales or 
personnel. I believe this 
qualifies me for this posi- 
tion because this position 
also involves talking to a 
large number of students 
and presenting their concen- 
sus of opinion to the board. 
Convincing the board that 
an issue is of the highest 
priority is of the utmost im- 
portance 

"In high school I had an 
office in the Student Coun- 
cil. I was also band presi- 
dent in one of the largest 
instrumental bands in the 
county at Wheeling High 
School. I was involved in a 
number of issues in high 
school However, since com- 
ing to Harper last year. I 
have chosen to become in- 
volved directly with the sen- 
ate but have spoken to a 
number of administrators, 
trying to get some of my 
views adapted. Ironically, 
last year I won an election 
for senator here at Harper, 
and I also tied with a non- 
student write-in candidate 
by the name of Mickey 
Mouse. (When informed df 
the victory I decided to de- 
cline the position.)" 

WHAT ARE SOME OF 
YOUR GOALS IF ELECTED 
TO THIS POSITION? 

"I stand firmly for chang- 
ing the semester system that 
we have now to a system 



where the student will be 
finished with the first 
semester before Christmas 
vacation, thus eliminating 
the anti -climactic periods 
before and after Christmas. 
After Ulking to the students, 
I have outlined a plan which 
I would like to present to the 
board. I have discussed this 
plan with Dean Burcholz and 
with Dr. Lucas, who is the 
director of planning and re- 
search here. 

"I hope to be able to start 
school the day after Labor 
Day and end the first se- 
mester laefore Christmas 
vacation, having a long vaca- 
tion including a good portion 
of January, thus starting 
fresh with the second semes - 
ter afterwards. * 

' 'That being on the top of 
my list, I also have ideas 
that were just brought to me 
during the last election. 
These items include various 
things as small as lockers 
in Building A, to a shuttle 
bus system within the Har- 
per structure, car pools, and 
a shuttle bus that would run 
to the -outlying areas also " 

DO YOU THINK THAT 
PART OF THE JOB WOULD 
BE TO COMMUNICATE THE 
FEELINGS AND POSITIONS 
OF THE BOARD TO THE 
STUDENTS? 

"This is a two way street 
I believe that mainly the 
feelings of the students 
should be brought to the 
board, but after the t)oard 
sits on it. whether they 
agree, disagree, or are in- 
different, I firmly feel that 
the board's opinion should 
be brought back to the stu- 
dents." 

HOW WOULD YOU GO A- 
BOUT COMPLETING THIS 
JOB? 

"Whether I win this elec- 
tion or lose. I still have a lot 
of views that I'd like to ex- 
press and there are a lot of 
goals I have been shooting 
for. I've been interviewing 
hundreds of people, but I 
still consider this only 
scratching the surface for 
this type of position. I plan 
to ccmtinue questioning peo- 
ple about the aspects of the 
college which they like, what 
they would like changed, and 
what they just plain don't 
like. I believe that this is the 
truest measure of opinion 




ffffprtseitafhfff Ifp9hl G9rald KUtGktklia 



that can be taken, and I per- 
sonally feel that in this job 
it would t}e my responsibility 
to bring this material direct- 
ly to the board." 

DO YOU FEEL THE 
BOARD WILL BE RECEP- 
TIVE TO YOUR IDEAS? 

' "I definitely feel the board 
would be receptive to my 
ideas. There is one thing 
that the board looks for.and 
they have a right to look 
for it. In any given issue, 
there is a question of prior- 
ity. Until now, in many cases 
the board has had trouble 
deciding the priority of is- 
sues because the students 
themselves have nothadpre- 
resentation on this position. 
"I believe that if I bring 
statistics (which I am al- 
ready building now), sur- 
veys, questionnaires, and di- 
rect opinions, they will be 
extremely receptive for the 
simple reason that they now 
have an accurate sample of 
what the students want the 
board to do for Harper Col-„., 
lege." 

WHAT IS YOUR OPINION 
OF OFFICE HOURS? 

"I do not believe office 
bout's are the best means of 
communication between me 
and the students at Harper. 



On the other hand. I am not 
against meeting someone in 
an office or. an area of the 
school I will gladly estab- 
lish an area where a student 
can set up an appointment 
with me. I will check peri- 
odically for the messages, 
and I will contact them on 
their own terms, whether 
they prefer to discuss the 
matter over the phone or on 
a personal basis " 

"If the representative 
does his job properly, he will 
have talked to hundreds of 
students per week. Being 
here 12 hours a day. I com- 
municate with a large num- 
ber of students during the 
day and early evening If 
elected, I will Uke it upon 
myself to drop in later to 
talk to the night students " 

IN THE PAST, HAVE YOU 
HAD ANY CONTA(rr WITH 
THE BOARD MEMBERS, EI- 
THER AS A GROUP, OR AS 
INDIVIDUALS? 

"I do not believe that the 
student represent a t i v e 
should have had personal 
ccmtact with the board mem - 
~bers. When the student is 
elected to this position he 
is going to be a constituent 
of these board members, sit- 
ting side by side with them 
when the decisions are being 
made. I have talked with 
board members in High 



School District 214 and have 
attended their board meet- 
ings. I have not done so with 
the board here at Harper." 

ARE YOU PRESENTLY 
HOLDING A JOB IN THE 
OUTSIDE WORLD? 

"Currentiy. I am a pur- 
chasing agent for a firm in 
Mount Prospect." 

APPROXIMATELY HOW 
MANY HOURS A WEEK ARE 
YOU WORKING, AND HOW 
IS THIS GOING TO AFFECT 
YOUR DUTIES IF ELECTED 
AS STUDENT REPRESEN- 
TATIVE? 

"Currentiy I am working 
more in the field and am 
not confined to one area. I 
do a lot of my work while I 
am at Harper I would like 
to handle this position by 
continuing to beat school 
for most of the day. getting 
the opinions of the students 
in the same way I have been 
doing it in the past " 



WHY SHOULD THE PEO- 
PLE VOTE FOR YOU IN- 
STEAD OF RICK Mc- 
INTYRE 

"In electing your repre- 
sentative, you are asked to 
choose between Rick, who is 
a Senator, and myself, who 
chose not to become a mem- 
ber of the Senate directly, 
but rather to try to get closer 
relationship with the board 
itseU 

"I think that the students 
should vote for the person 
who could spend enough time 
at school to meet enough 
people on a personal basis. 
This person should be able 
to take the issues and opin- 
ions of the students and pre- 
sent them to the board in a 
favorable manner The stu- 
dents of Harper College have 
the most important choice of 
any election held there to this 
date. The students mu^pick 
a representative who will not 
become a puppet. They must 
pick a person who will set a 
precedent. 

"I believe that because of 
the work I have t)een doing 
in the last few months, be- 
cause of the people I have 
talked to, the people I intend 
to talk to, I am the man who 
will give you the best job 
of representation for the 
whole student body. ' ' 



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H/1RBINGER 



Vol. 7, No. 13 



Wmiam Rainey Harper College. Algonquin and Roselle Roads. Palatine. Illinois 60067. 312-397-3000 



January 7, 1974 



last efocfJM fje; nn-vH ektthii WedMsday, Jan. 9 

Mclntyre in Student Rep. ron-off 



This interview was con- 
ducted by Lawrence R. Kiel 
on the 18 of December, 1973 
The questions that Kiel asked 
are in Capitals. andMr Mc- 
Intyres replies are in stan- 
dard type. 

FIRST OF ALL MR Mc- 
INTYRE. WE WOULD LIKE 
TO FIND OUT WHAT YOUR 
QUALIFICATIONS FOR 
THIS OFFICE ARE 

"I have what I feel a 
decent rapport with the stu- 
dents in that I do try to 
solicit their opinions on all 
matters that are presented to 
me that allow sufficient time 
to do so. 

"My personal feelings as 
to the qualifications for this 
office is the fact the individ- 
ual has to have a good 
head, and has to be able to 
rap with people, and has to 
be able to talk to people on 
issues which may or may 
not hold with his personal 
conviction, or may or may 
not hold with the convic- 
tions of the people he is 
speaking to These are things 
I do believe I fulfill." 



walking around, talking to 
people, going to them. This 
is probably where 1 would 
put the most emphasis. 

DO YOU THINK THAT 
THE BOARD WOULD BE 
RECEPTIVE TO YOUR 
IDEAS? 

"Let me clarify that first. 
These ideas will not be the 
ideas of the person that is 
the representative on the 
board, they will be the ideas 
of the students, and in that 
aspect, since the school's 
primary function is that at 
serving the students, and 
not running a business or- 
ganization, we re serving the 
students of the community, 
that yes, they must Not as 
my personal opinion, but they 
must be, as part of their 
function, receptive to the 
ideas I would bring them 
from the students." 




WHAT DO YOU FEEL 
THIS OFFICE WOULD EN 
TAIL IN THE LINE OF 
WORK. AS IT IS THE FIRST 
TIME THAT AN OFFICE OF 
THIS NATURE HAS BEEN 
OFFERED TO THE STU 
DENTS HERE AT HARPER? 
"I see it as setting up 
this mediator type thing 
where the individual serves 
as the Harper Board's word 
for the student, and the stu 
dents' word for Harper 
Board This would entail, as 
far as I'm concerned, serv- 
ing office hours, approxi- 
mately 8. possibly a little 
bit less if the response Isn't 
there, but there are students 
who come Monday. Wed 
nesday, and Friday, and 
there are students who come 
on Tuesday and Thursday, 
and I would like to offer 
them both two opportunities 
on two separate days to see 
me Then there are the eve- 
ning students who meet Mon- 
day, Tuesday, Wednesday, 
and Thursday. I would also 
offer them the same oppor- 
tunity. 

However, this does not 
completely entail the total 
expanse of what the person 
should offer the students 
There should be a lot of 



ALONG THOSE LINES. 
WHAT ARE SOME OF THE 
GOALS OR PROGRAMS 
THAT YOU HAVE DISCUSS- 
ED WITH THE STUDENTS? 
"I have not discussed the 
goals, I have asked, 'What 
do you want? " This is a med- 
iation job. this is not the job 
of the Individual. It Is the job 
of the students 

"A few things 1 have run 
down, was a few of the peo 
pie were upset with the way 
we handle a lot of our funds 
A lot more should go Into 
athletics, such as getting us 
an athletic field, which would 
get us more community res- 
pect for our athletic pro- 
gram 

"The largest problem stu- 
dents care about, is the 
social atmosphere here at 
Harper We are competing 
with Chicago, we are com- 
peting with the surrounding 
area to get people here The 
kids would much rather come 
here, than go anvwhereelse. 
'They are looking for 
someplace where they can 
have thesequote unquote cof- 
feehouse type of things, 
where they can come in. sit 
down, rap. and not be in a 
foreign atmosphere and be 
someplace where they can 
relax. But they're not find- 
ing it here at Harper. 

There ane things that 
are -run through here, like 
registration, courses, why 
do the Career Programs 
register fir«t? Some of the 



fff|irtseiifofhfff Jb^^tfi/ Itkk Mchtfrt 



courses in the catalog are 
not totally explicit We are 
getting thoughts from coun- 
selors, and faculty, parking, 
people llkethe shuttle These 
may or may not be func- 
tions that are primarily 
those of the board, but they 
concern the students Re- 
gardless of whether or not 
they are the primary func- 
tion of the board, they should 
be considered 

'This Is the job that I am 
looking to do That all ideas, 
and all thoughts will be pick- 
ed up. and worked on to the 
best of my ability. " 

DO YOU ANTICIPATE A 
PORTION OF THIS JOB BE- 
ING COMMUNICATING THE 
FEELINGS AND POSITIONS 
OF THE BOARD TO THE 
STUDENTS? 

"Most definitely This Is a 
large part of the function 
You cannot be a mediator if 
you only present one side you 
must present both sides 

"Probably the largest 
area of communication that 
is lacking presently. Is what 
goes on In the board room 
What goes on the second 
Thursday of each month, and 
this needs to be communi- 
cated. If something happen- 
ed that didn't go with the 
student desires, then they 
definitely want to know 
what's going on. and why 
the representative failed to 



represent It in a 
that people would 
benefits of it 



manner 
see the 



HAVE YOU IN THE PAST 
HAD ANY CONTACT WITH 
THE BOARD AS A GROUP, 
OR AS INDIVIDUALS? 

"I have, with this two week 
break, at the time of this 
taping, I planned to contact 
Mrs Nicklas. who Is chair- 
man of the board, and speak 
with her on cur re/jJT board 
activities, and if I can. get 
In touch with Mr Lawrence 
Moats, who Is the Vice 
Chairman, and speak with 
him " 

APPROXIMATELY HOW 
MANY HOURS A WEEK ARE 
YOU WORKING. AND HOW 
IS THIS GOING TO AFFECT 
YOUR DUTIES IF ELECT- 
ED? 

"Well. I work between 20 
and 30 hours per week, but I 
don't see this as a problem 
I do work on weekends, I 
do not work during the school 
week days, this would not 
hinder me at all. It has not 
hindered me in the past as 
Senator." 

YOU MENTIONED THAT 
YOU WOULD LIKE TO SEE 
MORE SOCIAL FUNCTIONS 
BROUGHT INTO THE 
SCHOOL. 

WHAT TYPES OF FUNC- 
TIONS WOULD YOU LIKE 



TO SEE? 

The things I express are 
what have been told to me. 
Yes, they would lUte to sa« 
the week-end lounge type of 
atmosphere, I use lounge in 
the broad sense of the word, 
not in the Student Louise 
type of activity. 

They would like to see 
alcohol on campus, they 
would like to see live enter- 
tainment on campus simul- 
taneously, and they don't like 
the atmosphere of setting up 
chairs, come In, pay your 
money, sit down, and leave 
after two hours It would be 
the In and out mingling type 
of thing." 

SEEING AS HOW THIS IS 
ONLY A TWO -MAN RACE, 
PERHAPS YOU CAN TELL 
US WHY WE SHOULD VOTE 
FOR YOU OVER GERALD 
McGLOTHLlN. 

'i see this as a question 
of qualification, and a ques- 
tion of purpose of office 
The sutements I have made 
as far as Purpose of office, 
as far as qualification. 
should efTectiveiy determine 
why I am the better candi- 
date. 

"I have been Involved, I 
have established a rapport 
with the administration, I 
have a rapport with the stu- 
dents, and the student gov- 
ernment. Gerry McGlothlin 
has perhaps served In some 
limited capacity, but I have 
not been totally aware of him 
working within the systemof 
student government Work- 
ing within the system maybe 
good, or it may be bad. but 
It gives the person somewhat 
of an Idea how we operate 
at Harper. 

"As far as setting the pre- 
cedent, as far as the Issues 
we discussed, as far as the 
board's receptiveness to the 
student. I see a definite bene- 
fit In my particular person 
'"I have taken an issue be- 
fore a body of people who 
were not receptive to it, who 
did not want to see It institut- 
ed, and 1 followed through. I 
planned It. and 1 presented It 
to the best of my ability. I 
am speaking of tuition re- 
bates. 

"I believe it to be a definite 
part of the job that is up- 
ccHning, that the person must 
continue in presenting the 
beliefs of the students, re- 
gardless of the opposition 
that he Is given " 



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IHE 



H/4RBINGER 

William Rainey Harper College, Algonquin and Roselle Roads, Palatine, Illinois 60067, 312-397-3000 




Vol. 7, No. 14 



January 9, 1974 



Election tie results in run off 



In the election for Stu- 
dent Representative to the 
Harper College Board of 
Trustees, ^ tie occurred. 
The results are as follows: 
Gerald McGlothlln 287 
Kick Mclntyre 287 

Write ins 30 

Invalid Ballots 79 

Toul voles cast 683 
The reason for such a 
large number of invalid bal- 
lots was due to the fact that 
when ballots were carried 
into the classrooms, the peo- 
ple who voted were reaulred 



to sign their names to the 
ballots, but many did not. 

Several ballots were in- 
validated due to marks other 
than an indication of the 
voter's preference, or vio- 
lation of different rules for 
balloting. 

In order for a ballot to 
be declared invalid, a ma- 
jority vote of the Election 
Committee was necessary. 

The candidates were made 
aware of this tie, and neither 
of them chose to contest the 
result9. 



Election rules slated 



By L.R. KIEL 

The Student Senate of Har- 
per College has established 
a series of guidelines by 
which January 9's election 
will be run These guide- 
lines were established par- 
tially because at the large 
number of invalid ballots in 
the last election. They are 
as follows: 

1) Date of the run <rff elec- 
tion- -Wednesday. January 
9. 1974 

2) Balloting will beconduct- 
ed for one day only. 

3) Voting station will be open 
from 9 am -5 p.m., in 
the college center oif A 
buildiag. and from 5-8 
p.m. on the third floor of 
F building 

4) No write-ins will be al- 
lowed. 

5) Balloting will ' be at the 
voting station only, no bal- 
lots will be brought into 
the classrooms. 

6) ANY MARK ON THE 
BALLOT OTHER THAN 
AN "X' OR A "CHECK • 
IN THE CANDIDATE'S 
BOX WILL INVALIDATE 
THE BALLOT. 

7) A new lottery will be con- 
ducted to determine the 
candidate's position on the 
ballot 

8) There will be no cam- 
paigning or publicity ma- 
terial within 25 feet of the 
voting station Violations 
may result in the person 
being removed as a can- 
didate in the election. Vio- 
lation of other candidate's 
rights may also result in 
removal from election 
Removal from election can 
be done by a 2/3 vote of 
the Student Senate 

9) All registered Harper 
students, credit, and non- 
credit are allowed to vote. 

10) The ballot box will be 
opened after all voting has 



ended witn members of the 
election committee, a rep- 
resentative of the HAR- 
BINGER or radio station, 
and the director of Student 
Activities present 

11) The Student Senate Elec- 
tion Committee is respon- 
sible for the procedures 
involved in overseeing the 
elections. 

12) Complaints about any 
aspect of the election must 
be submitted in writing to 
the chairman, or co- 
chairman of the election 
committee within 15 hours 
of the closing of the polls. 

' The Election Committee 
shall Judge the validity in 
each instance, and make 
a recommendation to the 
Student Senate The Stu- 
dent Senate shall make a 
final determination subject 
to review by the Vice 
Presided x)t Student Af- 
fairs. 

13) The election results 
must be validated by a ma- 
jority vote of the Student 
Senate before they become 
official 

14) IN THE EVENT OF A 
TIE BETWEEN THE TWO 
CANDIDATES. THE STU- 
DENT SENATE SHALL 
VOTE BY BALLOT TO 
ELECT THE REPRESEN- 
TATIVE A MAJORITY OF 
THE VOTES CAST WILL 
BE REQUIRED TO ELECT 
THE REPRESENTATIVE. 
Any questions regarding 

the election procedures can 
be answered by the election 
committee or the Director of 
Student Activities (A336). 

Members of the Election 
Committee for this election 
are as follows: 

Dave Hanneman (Chair- 
man), Larry Kiel, JimRicn- 
ter, Jeanne Rodseth, Kris 
Johnson. Lester Hanneman 
and Bob Yeoman. 



I 



A special run off election 
will be held January 9, in 
the race to determine who 
the student representative 
to the Harper College Board 
of Trustees will be. 

This election came about 
due to a tie in the election 
on the 12th and I3th of last 
month. 

The candidates running in 
this election are Gerald Mc- 
Glothlln and Rick Mclntyre 
Information on these two 
candidates is available in the 



special edition of the HAR- 
BINGER, which has been on 
the newsstands since last 
Thursday. 

When asked the question 
why the students should vote 
for him, over his opponent, 
Mclntyre stated 'I have been 
involved, I have established 
a rapport with the admir.s- 
tration, I have a rapport 
with the students, and the 
student government. Gerald 
McGlothlln has perhaps 
served in some limited ca- 



pacity, but 1 have not been 
totally aware 'of him work- 
ing within the system of stu- 
dent government." 

Asked the same question, 
McGlothlln responded, "I 
believe that because of the 
work I have been doing in 
the last few months, because 
of the people I have talked to, 
the people I intend to talk to, 
I am the man who will give 
you the best jobof represen- 
tation for the whole studeitt 
body. " 



Mf7/sdo/f's gaiM is Ikrp^r's ks$ 



Senator Bueschel resigns 



By DIANE DiBARTOLOMEO 

With the beginning of the 
new year came the resigna- 
tion of Stacey Bueschel. a 
senator who served on thp 
Student Senate at Harper 

Transferring to Hillside 
College in Michigan. Miss 
Bueschel will take with her 
the knowledge and exper- 
ience she has gained through 
her F>osition as senator 
"The Senate was beneficial 
in the respect that I learned 
a great deal about F>a>'lia- 
mentary procedure, the dif- 
ferent political stands within 
the student government, and 
I was able to cooperate with 
the other senators I was in- 
volved with. I also think that 
it is great how the senators 
cooperate among each 
other." said Miss Bueschel 
Besides being interested 
in the Political program at 



Hillsdale. Miss Bueschel 
claims that. 'The biggest 
problem with a Junior col- 
lege is not academic wise, 
but that everybody needs to 




Stacey Bueschell reflects over 
her term of oince. 

get away from home and ex- 
perience life and education 
on their own Education 
doesn't stop at books, it de- 
velops a balance with social 



life that one can gain by liv- 
ing on campus." 

As the senator reflected 
over her short termlnoffice 
she found two weak points in 
the Senate that she would like 
to share with everyone. Miss 
Bueschel said, "it is unfor- 
tunate that the senators and 
students that attend meetings 
are inhibited' to express 
themselves due to parlia- 
mentary procedure Most 
senators do not understand 
Roberts Rules of Order and 
find it difficult and uncom- 
fortable to conduct business 
in such a way. If the meet- 
ings were to be conducted 
in an informal atmosphere 
I think the Senate would get 
better response from its of- 
ficers " 

Secondly, she would liketo 

(Turn to Page 4) 



Pn-stanred contestants 
We f« break ret'd hen 



i ACO 

E At I WG 

com. 



Larry Fredrich, film chair- 
man on the Program Board, 
gets his message across. 



By DIANE DiBARTOLOMEO 

Five, four, three, two, one 
. . . the taco eating contest 
is on! For thirty minutes 
on January 9. eleven pre- 
starved contestants will at- 
tempt to establish a new 
record for the consumption 
of tacos. by one person 
The present record is forty - 
two tacos in thirty minutes. 

The competition begins at 
12 noon in the cafeteria 

The Program Board is 
sponsoring the contest for 
Harper students. However, 
each "eater" must bepre- 
sponsored by an authorized 
camfxjs club or organiza- 
tion. The prize is $20 and 



will be given to the clu'B 
whose contestant has won. 

Channel 7's Frank Mathy, 
will be covering the contest 
live So will WHCM. the 
campus radio station and the 
Learning Resources Center. 

Those clubs entering the 
contest and their eatersare: 
Cheerleaders - - Chuck 
Malanchunk. Future Secre- 
taries -- Robert Hayhurst, 
Harbinger -Rich Kusnierek, 
P E. Majors -- Jeff Sallas, 
Practical Nurses - - Jim 
Fink. Psych Club - - Janet 
Rocke. Senate- Mark Tabac, 
Talons- -John Hoertier, Ski 
Club-Bill Sahli, WHCM - 

(Turn to Page 5) 



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H 



H/f^NGER 



January 9, 1974 



GILBMCMR 
OFEI/EMS 

On Campus — 

Films • "Reefer Madness" & "I Was a Teenage Were- 
wolf*. Pit. Jan. 11. 8:00 p.m., E-106. Admission: 
$.50 for students, faculty, & staff with I.D. 

Watch the Taco Eating Contest, today, Jan. 9, 12 noon, 
cafe. 

Today, Jan. 9 on Harper television, channel 6, "What 
Will They Think Of Next?" 
Shown at 10 & 11 a.m., 12 noon, 1, 6, 7 & » p.m. 

"Son of Movie Orgy", video-tape program, shows 
from the '50's. Mon.. Jan. 7th-Thurs., Jan. 10th. 
Television in fireplace area of Lounge, 10 a.m. - 
2 p.m. 
Music - 

Siegel-Schwall Band, famous for its blues & rock n' 
roll sounds, will be in concert at Triton College, in 
the Ironwood Room of the College Center, tonight, 
Jan. 9, 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $2 in advance. from% 
the Information Deslt in the College Center BIdg. of 
Elmhurst College's Student Union, $2.50 at the door. 

Rare Earth, at the Arie Crown The., Jan. 12 & 13. 

TTie Four Seasons, Feb. 16, Arie Crown The. 

Stephen Stills, Mar. 8, Auditorium The. 

Johnny Winter, at the Amphitheatre, Mar. 13. 

The Lettermen, at the Arie Crown, Mar. 15. 

Two GeneraUons of Brubeck, Mar. 16, Auditorium The. 

Theatre — 

"An Evening on Broadway", musical revue presented 
by Triton College's vocal club Tri MuOmega, Jan. 
26 & 26 & Feb. 1-2, Ironwood Room of the CoUege 
Center Bldg. Tickets are $2 for adults & $1 for 
children under 12. Proceeds will go towards a chor- 
al tour and scholarship fund. For more information 
Ph. 456-0300, Ext 390 ( Information Desk). 

"Dance on a Country Grave", Arlington Park The, 
Ph. 392-6800. 

"Gnaw", at tbc Shubert The. Ph. CR 6-8240. 

''The River Nlger",'^at the Studebaker thru Jan. 27. 
Ph. 922-2973. 

"I Do! I Do!", at the Ivanhoe. Ph. 248-6800 or GR 2- 
2711. 

"The Reluctant Debutante", with Joseph Cotton, Dniry 
Lane The. 

"CaU Me by My Rightful Name", with Don Murray, 
opens Jan. 11, Pheasant Run Playhouse. 



Say "I love you" 

with more love 

than money. 




^ 



For|ustftM.inr»c1. 

Yes. we have fine quality 
duimoodsfort98 And on up 
toSS.OOO You II find them many 
one of our stores And you ll 
appreciate two rules every 
HoflaiKte employee lives by 



nrst, we r>ev»r high pretsur*. We 

prefer that you shop slowly and 
carefully Look at only those 
dianxindsthat you can afford We 
have a large selection myour price 
category AsK as many questions as 
you like We II give you all the 
answers Straight 



S«cof>d. since 1 9 1 our policy of 
raturning your money it tor any 
reasonyou re not satisfied 
So if you have the love and a little 
tjitofmoney, we have the right 
diamond for you 



IIoIIiiihIs elriivlors 

D<u^il(Avn: 1 1') \ \Vi»h,i*h fvorgrcfn f^,i/.i Liki-hiirst WcHidlicId 



Car pooling topic of 
''Focus: Northwest" 



Sharon Alter. Harper As- 
sistant Professor of History 
and Moderator ot the "Fo- 
cus: Northwest" broadcast, 
will converse with Bob 
Burns, Managing Editor of 
the Des Plaines Suburban 
Times; Pat Casey. Counsel 
with the American Insurance 
Association; and Harry Ben- 
stein. Independent Insurance 
agent of Palatine on the Jan 
13 program. 

Har-y Bsnstein states that 
car pooling for profit versus 
not for profit use should be a 
major consideration when 
choosing car insurance. Pat 
Ca£«y agrees and mentions 
the serious legal complica - 
tions which could arise from 
insuCficieA coverage. Editor 



Bob Burns explains how the 
Des Plaines Suburban Times 
is worldng to help organize 
area car pools. 

"Focus: Northwest" can 
be heard each Sunday on 



WWMM(FM). 92.7. at 8 am 
with a rebroadcast at 9 p.m. 
The series is produced and 
directed by Harriet Kandel- 
man from the Office of Com- 
munity Relations. 




Panel menibers, from left, Pat Cosey, Bob Bruns, Har- 
ry Bernstein and Sharon Aiter.(Photo by Chuck Zemcske) 



/Nvi/c Dipt f9 9iptMi pr99nm 



By HEIDI JOHNSON 

Harper College's Music 
Department vrlll expand its 
program with two new 
coursea second semester. 
Qaaa Voice and Community 
Jazz Band will be offered, 
the objective of the latter to 
involve more of the com- 
munity in the college. 

Community Jazz Band 
(Mua 145-004) will be held 
Wedneadaya from 730- 10:00 
p.m.. A- 139. This course is 
open to the community and 
to Harper students, and may 
be taken as continuing edu- 
cation or for credit. This is 
the firat time Jazz Band 
haa bean offered to the com - 
munity. 

Mr. David Hans, a mem- 
ber of the community, will 
be directing the Jazz band. 
Mr. Hans has had wid« ex- 
perience with other Jazz 
groups and haa atudied wM^ 
the well - known saxophone 
player, Joe Daly. He plans on 
using a variety of Jazz and 
rock music in the course 
Peraona interested in the 
course should have previous 
playing experience of some 
band instrument, such as 
saxophones, brass and per- 
cussion, and should also be 
able to read music fairly 
weU. 



Qaaa Voice(Mus 169-001) 
will be offered for anyone 
interested in learning to 
sing It will be on Tuesdays 
and Thursdays from 2-3:15 
p.m.. A-145, and counts for 
two semastar houra credit 
It will ba taam-taught by the 
Harper College Voice Facul - 
ty. Some of the main objec- 
tives of the course, besides 
developing a vocal sound that 
is free, relaxed and pleas- 
ing to hear, are: sight read- 
ing, tone, learning proper 
breathing, music notation, 
building a repertoire of ele- 
mentary song literature, 
providing ^nsemble and solo 
experience, and learning 
phrasing and dynamics. 

Both claaaaa be^n Jan. 
28. More infortnation about 
the claaaea and registration 
can be obtained from Dr. 
T llotson, 397-3000, Ext. 
309. 

Students with previous ex- 
perience in playing band in- 
struments may also be inter- 
ested in Joining the "pep 
band" to play for one of 
Harper's basketball games 
These students need not be 
presently in band. More in- 
formation may be obtained 
at the first rehearsal, which 
is Jan. 28, A- 139, from 3- 
4:15 p.m., or contact Dr. 
Tillotson, Ext. 309. 



Forty scholarships Mered 



'The Board of Trustees 
of St. Charles. Missouri has 
Just approved a $5 2. 500 grant 
fund that has been made 
available to Harper students 
who are planning to attend 
the Lindenwood College for 
Women to achieve their B. A. 
or B.S. degrees There are 
25 scholarships at $500each 
for freshman women to be 
awarded on the basis o^ead- 
ership and scholastic ac- 
complishments in high 
school. 



Forty scholarships are 
available at $1000 each to 
graduates of two-year col- 
leges. In order to qualify, 
the applicant must demon- 
strate financial need. 

Winners of the Monticello 
College Foundation Scholar- 
ships will be selected by the 
administration of the Lin- 
denwood College. Contact 
the Placement and Finan- 
c iai Aids Office if you have 
any further questions." 



B9$i9t$$/hd9$trhl 
stmimirs b9giM'mg 

The second series of Bus - 
iness / Industrial seminars 
for the 1974 spring program 
will be presented January 
18 This seminar will be 
conducted as a Joint session 
for managers and supervis- 
ors on improving empioyee 
performance througli 
"Coaching." 

In the general interest 
category is the Motivation" 
seminar set for January 28. 
The cost is $50 

"Management by Objec- 
tives" will be offered to 
managers January 31 - Feb- 
ruary 1 The fee is $100 

Seminars begin at 8:30 
am with coffee and rolls, 
and end at 4 p m 

The Community Services 
Office handles registrations 
at Harper College For phone 
reservations, telephone 397- 
3000. extension 248 



SfwU hrndi 

The Illinois General As- 
sembly on November 13 ov- 
errode Governor Walker's 
veto of community college 
funding, providing for an in- 
crease in revenue of more 
than $100,000 for Harper 

The Illinois House of Re- 
presentatives voted 122-29 
to override the veto. The 
Senate earlier had voted 30- 
8 to overturn the veto. 

The veto override means 
that the state's community 
colleges will receive $18.50 
for each credit hour taken 
by students. The governor 
had reduced this amount to 
$17.61. Last year "com- 
munity colleges received 
$16.50 per credit hour 

The action will cost the 
State of Illinois an addit- 
ional $4.1 million. 



January 9, 1974 



K 



H/1RBINGER 



Page 3 



OUTPUT 



^ 



f/ecf/off work commended 



One of the better and more 
challenging elections at Har- 
per this year was that of the 
student representative to the 
board of trustees, conducted 
on December 11 and 12 In 
that election voter turnout, 
campaign procedures and 
cooperation within student 
activities was at its all time 
high All three methods men- 
tioned were vital totheelec- 
tion and could have not been 
successful without one or the 
other. 

It was not unusual that day 
to have a senator, a WHCM 
or Harbinger staff member 
visit your class and cam- 
paign for the voter, and to 
encourage him to return the 
visit at the polls. 

Both the publicity from the 
two media sources on cam- 
pus WHCM and the Harbin- 
ger, and the referendum built 
up interest within the student 
body But the highlight of the 
election wasn't until the two 
candidates started cam- 
paigning on a one to one 
basis with the student body 
and at that point the elec- 
tion caught on to a new name 
- - "the race," 

It waa called this partly 



because of the time element 
involved and the campaign- 
ing rules of theelection Be- 
ing denied public display for 
publicity purposes or the 
voice of an open forum, both 
candidates worked very 
much under pressure. 

The race against time by 
the candidates to reach out to 
inform and sell their ideas 
to the voters was truly a 
fresh method to be seen on 
campus those few days. Can- 
didates Gerald McGlothlin 
and Rick Mclntyre ran an 
excellent race The involve- 
ment of those clubs In stu- 
dent activities to promote the 
election deserve special 
m^rlt. they were very co- 
operative and effective 

The results proved the 
race to be a success when 
the ballots were tallied The 
turnout at the polls skyrock- 
eted to a total of 683 cast 
But even more amazing was 
the^ breakdown. 287 to 287! 

Yes, the race is on tfpin 
and can be observed, this 
Wednesday. January 9. 
Ana. this time let's try to 
break another record. 



Due to exams, the next issue 
of the Harbinger will be Ian. 28 



# '^H/I^BINGER # 



Kditor-in-chief 
Managing Editor 
Business .Manager 
Activities Editor 
Cartoon Editor 
Cartoonists 
Photo Editor 
Photographers 



Diane DiBartolo..ieo 

L.K. Kiel 

Gary Zdeb 

Heidi Johnson 

Dennis Murray 

Joyce Tarwid. Juan Nunez 

Chuck Zemeske 

Paul Cord, Ken Kissam 



Contributing Staff: 
Dave Gordon, Mary Beth Christy, Greg Conway, Sue 
Pollack, Bill Whitehead , Glenn Lewin, Larry Fredrich 
and Richard Kusnierek. 

Advisor: 
Mr. Sturdevant 

The HARHIN'GKR is the student publication for the 
Harper College campus community, published wet-kly 
except during holidays and mid-terms. All opinions ex- 
pressed on the editorial page or in the columns are 
those of the writer, and are not necessarily those of the 
college, its administration, faculty or student body. 
For information on advertising, rates and publica- 
tion schedule, call or write Harbinger Business Of- 
fice. 

William Rainey Harper College, Algonquin and 
Roselle Rds., Palatine. Illinois 60067. Phone num- 
b'T 397-3000. exl. 272 fuid 460. I 



n. 













It rests on luck 
as you blunder along 

The following editorial was written last year by Mark Kaneen. It 
applies well to current registration so we decided to reprint U for those 
who weren't here last year. 



Looking back on last fall's registration and trybig not to get ill 
thinking about doing it again, we came up with an idea for a new 
board game - "Registration." Any number can play. In fact, to be 
played properly . there should be more players than you have room 
for. 

At the start, the players (Hereinafter to be called "students" ) pick a 
plastic counter to represent them as they blunder through the maze. 
Suitable counters include e cap and gown, a gym shoe, a pair of blue 
jeans, a roach, and a turkey. 

Action starts with students on the square marked "course selection." 
The die is rolled to determine the extent of any injuries incurred while 
pressing through a crowd to read class times on a shredded IBM sheet. 
After the die roll, students may be incapacitated and unable to continue. 
On the first turn, survivors try to land on the "Counselor Available " 
square to get their schedules approved. If you get Uiere fast, you're on 
your way. If not, you lose turns until you land on it. 

Each student gets three "bullshit " carda to use diuring the game. 
They may be played whenever needed. Examples of use include convinc- 
ing your counselor that nursing students don't need to take anatomy, 
convincing financial aids that you need a loan, or convincing your- 
self that you know what you're doing. Patient players might get 2/3s 
of the way through the board without playing a "bullshit" card; reck- 
less players will play them quickly and hope for for the best; smart 
players save them for use in the "Teacher " game on the back of the 
"Registration" board. 

Once out of the counseling center, students move down the line to 
the "station" squares. Eleven different stations are represented, each 
one an indispensable step. But-Uiey are not in sequential order, so the 
trick is to find the right combination of foreward and backward moves 
to get by all of them. Then and only then may you go to die "Termin- 
al" square. 

Mbced in with the ".Station" squares ar^sorted hazards. The "Petty" 
square means you ran across «h uncooperative registration staffer; 
you have the option to play a bullshit card or lose two turns. The 
"lose your place in line" square costs you a turn, and the "stand in 
the wrong line for three hours" square costs you your sanity. 

There are 13 "Pick a Card" spaces. Students who land on them 
must draw a card from the "Frustration" deck and follow its instruc- 
tions. Draws like the "have to go to the bathroom" card add hilarity 
to the game, another card gives you a loaded revolver to trump "Pet- 
ty" squares. There is one "Today we're only processing those people 
whose l*8t names begin with Q's, X's and triple consonants" card 
that eliminates you from the game - unless you have a revolver card. 
Shidents who make it through to the "Terminal" square roll tiie 
die to determine if the terminals are open and manned. If they are, 
you spin the wheel. If it lands on "error ' ' tough luck kid, back you 
go to "course selection." If not - you made it,. Now you can pay your 
fees. 



■J 



} 



.k 



\ 



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Page 4 



T€ 



H>1RBINGER 



January 9. 1974 



"Dance on a Country Grave^^ very much alive 



By HEIDI JOHNSON 

A new musical, "Dance On 
A Country Grave," had Its 
world premiere at the Ar- 
lington Part Theatre over 
New Year's Eve and will run 
through Jan 27. The musi- 
cal, with words, music and 
lyrics by Kelly Hamilton, is 
based on a novel by Thomas 
Hardy. It Is directed by Pat- 
rick Henry. The "Dance" is 
a likeable musical, be- 
cause of some of the different 
techniques used, but it lacks 
Just a bit of pizzazz to make 
it a big box-office hit. 

The "Dance" opens on 
Egdon Heath, a southwest - 
em English countryside, in 
the mid -nineteenth century. 
Us people are influenced by 
Ike Dniids and Celts who 
lived before them, and they 



see life at the Heath as a 
cycle that no one there can 
escape. Eustacia (Andrea 
Marcovicci) was not born at 
the Heath and has hopes of 
leaving. Although she loves 
Wildeve (Qifford David), 
through a twist of Fate, she 
marries Clym Yeobright, 
thinking he will return to 
Paris with her. Wildeve 
marries Clym's cousin Tho- 
masin (Indira D a n k s). 
Clym's heart is at home, 
however, and he does not re- 
turn to Paris. Eustacia would 
run away with Wildeve, but 
Fate interrupts once again. 
The innocence and naivete of 
Christian (John Savage) 
saves the production from 
being too serious. 

The stage is bare except 
for the occasional fog from 
the fog machine , and the sets , 



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Art 

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Communication Arts and 

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Busln«>^s Administration 

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Writing Program 

English Education Program 

Literature Program 

Pre Graduate Program 
F.rench 
German 
Mislory 
Home Economics 

Foods aim Nutrition 

Home Ecoixjmics Education 

General Home Economics 

Clothing and Textiles 
Italian 

Mathematics 
Music 

Bachelor of Arts 

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Philosophy 
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Psychology 
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Spanish and Portcguesc 



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Send information to 

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which add to the mystical 
appearance of the stage by 
screening out the musicians, 
but not the actors' shadows. 
The music seems to come 
from "nowhere," in keeping 
with the Druid theme. 

The music is excellent. It 
sounds like original folk mu- 
sic, haunted and mystical 
when it should be, and light 
and gypsyish when it should 
be. Some of the-songs seem 
to have the same theme of 



music running through them, 
but most of them are ori- 
ginal. However, they aren't, 
the kind that are remember- 
ed for very long. The voices 
are strong and blend well to- 
gether. The choreography 
seemed stiff inplaces, due to 
the different levels at the 
stage. All in all, the music 
and mystery captivate the 
audience, and with a little 
more life to it, the "Dance" 
would be superb. 



ffoiper players first 
performante vnveils talent 



By LARRY FREDRICK 

The performance done by 
the Harper Players on Dec 
7 was a memorable one for 
the handful of people that 
came. A lot of credit must 
be given to them. It's dif- 
ficult to do your best when 
you have such a disappoint- 
ing turnout. The first of 
the four one-act plays. The 
Wonderful Ice Cream Suit. 
did seem a bit lengthy and 
overdone, but humorous 
nonetheless. 

it's doubtful that the au- 
dience will forget the last 
two plays. Count Dracula and 
Death Knocks. Both were 
comical satires of the clas- 
sics, the Count mistakenly 
goes visiting during a to- 
tal eclipse and when he 



realizes his plight he tries 
to hide in the closet but nosy 
guests drag him into the light 
and to his death. When Death 
comes for his first victim, 
Nat Ackerman. he is duped 
into a game of gin rummy, 
and loses so badly that he is 
forced to borrow money for 
carfare home. The scene 
closes with Nat calling up a 
friend and explaining what a 
"schlep" Death is. 

The show was evidence to 
us all that there is plenty 
of acting talent here at Har- 
per and that it's a shame that 
most people don't take ad- 
vantage of what's available. 
I would also like to extend 
my congratulations for a Job 
well done, to the people that 
worked behind the scenes on 
makeup, sound, and lighting. 
They were great. 



^••ksfore coflftsfoifs •■■•tice^ 



By HEIDI JOHNSON 

On Dec 7. Haiper Col- 
lege's Elookstore selected 
winners from a prize draw- 
ing that ran through Dec. 6. 
The drawing was open to all 
except Harper College Book- 
store employees and their 
families. Persons were al- 
lowed to enter once per visit 
to the Bookstore. 

There were nine prizes, 
one each of first through 
sixth prize, two seventh 
prizes, six eighth prizes and 
twelve ninth prizes. The 
prizes, in order from first 
through ninth, were as fol- 
lows: a pocket calculator. 
Webster's 3rd International 
Dictionary, "Gyrosphere" 
Globe, Attache Case. Shoul- 
der Tote Bag, Paper mate 



Set. Goode's World Atlas, 
Paperweight Tape Dispens- 
ers, and Superboxes. The 
toial value of the prizes 
was over $250.00 

Congratulations to the 
winners, (first) Monica Sid- 
orchuck, (secoixl) Mike Mor- 
gan, (third) Eric Mur- 
gatroyd. (fourth) Charles 
English, (fifth) Dorothy Ka in. 
(sixth) Ruth Witsiepe. 
(seventh) Jody Kosec and 
Floyd Merriman. (eighth) 
Barbara Schumacher. Gary 
Kozak. Debbie Newmann. 
William Krueger. Denise 
Dulaney and J. Connell 
(ninth) Deborah Ann Nanika. 
Bob Clarke, Tom Krisher, 
Noreen Lopez, Jack Tippens. 
Barb Gaulke, Douglas Foss. 
Gary Kozak, Frank Smith. 
Patricia Budin. Patricia He - 
lander and Nora Fox. 



ABORTION 

NORTH SUBURBAN AND CHICAGO CLINIC 



FREE PREGNANCY TESTING 



Immediote Results 
Privole Confedeniial Assistonce 
in Terminolion of Pregnoncy 
FAMILY PLANNING 

Americon's \Abmen Center 



ONE LOW 
COST 

Poyments Arrangea 

(312) 674-0902 or 534-6566 



J^ 




Now that the holiday sea- 
son is behind us for another 
year and the first semester 
of the 73-74 school year is 
coming to a close, it seems 
that the time would be just 
about ripe for everyone in 
the Harper community, both 
active and docile, to stop for 
a moment and take a good, 
long look at where they've 
been and where they're go- 
ing. 

The year 1973 was not a 
a good year -- locally, 
nationally, or world-wide. 
Crisis upon crisis came into 
focus, and for many of the 
less optimistic it must seem 
as though the decline and 
fall of the Roman Empire is 
to be re -activated for the 
purpose of destroying our 
present day civilization. 

At the risk of sounding 
overly fatalistic. I'm afraid 
that I must agree, somewhat, 
with this hypothesis The 
variance of reasons is great, 
but the general, (and I des- 
pise generalities), conclus- 
ion is the same in every 
case. Too many people are 
using too many ways to ob - 
taLi too much wealth, com- 
fort, pleasure, and personal 
satisfaction In short, weare 
becoming a society of hedon- 
ists. 

It is my fervent hope that 
in (he year 1974, a change 
will takeplaceinour society, 
and In our world. The im- 
portance of love and peace 
has been much stressed, but 
little has been done tp^use 
them ^ 

In this, my last column. 
I would like to thank the 
editorial suff of the Har- 
binger for their co-opera- 
tion, but more than that I 
would like to wish you all 
love and peace for the com- 
ing year. 

Hopefully. 1974 will hold 
the key to the most elusive 
life saver there is -- the 
brotherhood of man. 



Bueschel 



(ConL from Page 1) 

see more constructive criti- 
cism offered to the Senate 
and "not base it on per- 
sonal vendettas." the sena- 
tor said. 

Miss Bueschel also serv- 
ed on the Federation at Hills - 
dale, similar to the Student 
Senate at Harper 



RESEARCH 



Thousands of Topics 
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Send for your up to date. 160 page, 
mail order catalog Enclose $1 00 
to cover postage (delwery time is 
1 to 2 days) 

RESEARCH ASSISTANCE. INC. 

11941 WILSHIRt BLVD . SUITt »2 

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. 90025 

(213) 477 8474 or 477 5493 

Our rtiurcli mtterlal it told for 
rtittrch (ttittjnce only 



January 9. 1974 



T€ 



H/R6INGER 



Page 6 



FINAL examination; schedule 



Day School 



January, 1974 



Final Exam Period 



7:00 



7:50* 



8:00 



9:50 



Monday 
January 14 



T-R 
TjOO - T^L^O. 

KNCLISH lOl 



M-W-F 




. .IQ ^'l^ kW^- ^?.v>0._-_10 L A5 



y.-w-F 

l;JO__-_ 1:50 

m"w-f' 

N:00 - 9:50 



Tuesday 
January 15 



T-R 
7:00 - 7:50 



ENGLISH 102 



T-R 



M-W.-F 
2:00 - 2:50 



Wednesday 
January 16 



M-W-F 
8:00 - 8:50 



M-W-F 
11:00 - 11:50 



Thursday 
January 17 



T-R 
8:00 - 9:15 



M-W-F 
12:00 - 12:50 



M-W-F 
3:00 - 3:50 



T-R - 
3:30 - 4:45 



M-W-F 
4:00 - 4:50 



T-R 
2:00 - 3:15 



T-R 
11:00 - 12:15 



Friday 

January 18 



M-W-F 
7:00 - 7:50 



T-R 
12:30 - 1:45 



MAKE-UP 



Evening School 
1. Classes beginning at 4:55 p.m. or i^fter will follow the evening class 

2 Evening classes will use their last aeetlng of the week of January 14 
classes meeting two and three days a week will use the last two class 
final examination period should not be longer than two hours. 

3. Saturday morning classes must hold the final examination on Saturday, 

GRADES ARE DUE NO LATER THAN NOON. JANUARY 
*The exam can be given on Monday or Tuesday or both days. 



schedule. 

for final examinations. Evening 
periods for final examinations. The 



January 12. 

19. 1974 





^ CHTafcJwug^lt,. 




HoalUnillM needed: 

Internattonal Cultural Bxchanae. ■ 
world-wide exchan«eprocr«in needs 
placement for foreign tludent*. who 
come to the U.S.A. to attend hijch 
•cbool and become an active member 
ct the family circle. 
Contact Lull Nunc* lUlnote Fldd 
Asaoclale (aiDMO-STTT. 

LOST one bracclH. silver link w/ 
air force wine*. Reward. S6a-M20. 

^M Ford Falrlaac 2 dr . A.T.. P.&. 
radios good ga* mtleagc 9300. 
BSS-74M. 



■nnjRiAL 



MINI-SEMINAt 
ON TEST-TAKING 

The Office of Testing Ser- 
vices has available a film 
strip offering helpful hints 
on test Uldng techniques and 
practical rules for success- 
ful tesl-Uklng. Two broad 
categories are covered-the 
curriculum based test and 
the sundardized test. 

There will also be an in- 
structor from Harper's 
Learning Lab to present va- 
luable tips on preparing for 
exams and taking tests 

This one hour mini -semi- 
nar will be offered in the 
test room of the Counseling 
Center A347 on Tuesday. 
January 8 at 10 a.m., noon, 
and 2 pm and on Wednes- 
day. January 9 at 10 a.m.. 
noon, and 3 p.m. 



"Expanded Horizons" series 



Women unite' Are you 
planning on coming bacl( to 
college, either to learn or 
prepare for a career or com- 
plete a degree? Harper Col- 
lege is having a special pro- 
gram. "Back to School. "Just 
for you It will be held at 
Harper College. Jan 11. I - 
3:30 pm . Room A-242 

The session will help wo- 
men overcome the obstacles 
of returning to college, such 
as acceptance by students 
and faculty, competence, and 
responsibilities to their 
families It will also pro- 
vide information about test- 
ing, counseling, registration 
and admission. 

The program is part of a 
series for women, entitled 



«ECI«TIUTION DATE FOB 

SrRING REMMTEH J1*7« 

RcKMratton for lh« Sprini Semnlrr 1974 mill t)f h«ld or. 

tht foUowlnn d»M». and pronrntiS throu«h Ih« Wrininato 

•t lh« follo»tn« ttmr*: 



January 8 
January 1 1 

January 21. 22. 23 
.lanuary 24. 25 

January 2« 
January 28. 29. 30 

4 January 31. Feb 1 



5:30 P.M. 8 30 PAt 

900A.M-12 00A.M 
I 00PM- 4 00PM 

8 4S AM. 7 30 PM PHONE 

REGISTRATION 

»:00 AM- 3:30PM REGILAR 

6:30 PM laOO PM REG 

ftOOA.M.- 12:30 PM 

10:00 A.M 11 30 A.M. LATE 

1:00 PM 330 P.M. REG 
6:30 P M. 8:00 PM * ADDS 

* DROPS 

10 00 AM 11 30 AM I.ATK 

1 30 PM 3:00 PM RKG 

A ADDS A PROPS 



"Expanding Horizons ' For / 
registration and moreinfor-/ 
maUon. call 397-3000. Ext 
301 



Taco staffers 



(ConL from Page 1) 

Clarke Sanders, and Pom 
Pons- Tom Trunda; Oper- 
ating Room Tech.- Ralph 
Grady; Second Yr. Nurses- 
Dave Hanneman; food ser- 
vices - Randy Tendering; 
Denial Hygiene-Cindy La- 
th an. 



In the Dark age». kisaing 



■3., 

In the Dark age». kisaing 
was dechred a sure cure of 
■ headache. They couWn't 
hav e been com pletely dark. 



SfvrtiiMf §f ^•litf 

This letter of policy deals 
directly with the Harbinger 
Follies Page The comic 
page which appears regular- 
ly on page 7 every week will 
only be printed when there 
are eight or more pages in 
the Harbinger 

Personals can be sub- 
mitted by anyone free of 
charge and can be dropped off 
at the Harbinger office in A 
367 Note: personals are 
subject to editing. 

Since this year is the first 
time the Harbinger has ever 
run a regular comic page we 
are interested in our read- 
ers' response and open to 
suggestions. 




^uvwrnoToKTia wwrr 

ttT4uY UILITCIMT.SOHI CO«A.O 
D/irC TMlS tWCK VHCtAT WYTIoHIM 



GOOD THINGS COME IN SMALL CLASSES 

SANGAMON STATE UNIVERSITY 

Springfield, Illinois , 

Created specifically for the Community College transfer student 
with programs in a variety of fields. Sangamon is dedicated to 
personal attention for students through small classes and close 
association with faculty advisors. 

OFFERING THE B.A. AND MA. DEGREES. 

See your counselor about this new university located in the State 
Capiul. It begins at the junior year just for you. 




Pooa *TuWVT,aA«r HI thai HKAVy 
BooKiM*. all ^♦ fnded up with wm an 
A ID 4tw ctjjn*. 3n4 a 9aeHEW HiAtT. 




.J 



Page 6 



H 



H/4RBiNGER 



January 9, 1974 



\. 



By GLENN LEWIN 

Out of the five basketball 
games played over the holi - 
day season. Harper claimed 
victories in three, two of the 
three in the Highland classic. 
Harper started out the 
Holiday season by posting a 
loss to the College of Du- 
Page, 74-66. Mike Millner 
played phenomenally, scor- 
ing 31 out of the Hawks 66 
points. Coach Bechtold felt 
his team's loss was attribut- 
ed to their lack of success 
on the boards. 

The Hawks next opponent 
was Olive- Harvey, with Har- 
per cleanly defeating them 
64-54. Harper played a much 
more representative game, 
controlling the boards all 
the way through. Olive - Har- 



Holiday basketball wrap up 



vey was forced into making 
quite a few mistakes, result- 
ing in wild shots and missed 
•rebounds. The game's high- 
est scoring player was Har- 
per's Dave Schmitt. scoring 
27 of the Hawks' 64 points. 
Perhaps the most impor- 
tant set of games played by 
Harper this year was the 
Highland Classic In Free- 
port, which was the only 
tournament that Hrrper par- 
ticipated in all season 

Harper started out the 
tournament bv defeating 
Highland J C. 81-45 Har- 
per controlled the boards by 
outrebounding Highland. 44- 
28. Chuck Neary was Har- 
per's leading scorer with 
19 points. 

The next team to face 
Harper was Joliet, whom 



Proficiency exams 



Proficiency examinations 
in typing and shorthand skills 
._wlll be given at Harper Col- 
lege on January 22 and 23. 
College credit will be given 
to those who pass the tests 

The shorthand proficiency 
examination will be given 
January 22 from 6:30 p.m 
to 9:30 p.m. The typing pro- 
ficiency exam will be held 
on January 23 during the 
same hours. 

These credits can be ap- 
plied to a number of as- 
sociate degree and certifi- 
cate programs offered 
through the Harper College 
secretarial science pro- 
gram 

Further information, and 
application forms for these 
tests, may be obtained from 
the Office of Testing, Harper 



WHCM, the Harper radio 
station, is conducting a sur- 
vey so they can better serve 
the Harper College student 
body Please fill in your 
top ten favorite recording 
artists (groups, individuals, 
etc ) The ballots can be 
dropped in a box. located 
under the ride board, near 
the pool tables We would 
appreciate your co-opera- 
tion in this endeavor. Happy 
New Year (and happy lis- 
tening) from the Music Ma- 
chine, WHCM 



1 



4 

5. 

6 

7. 
8. 
9. 
10 



College. Algonquin and Ro- 
and Roselle Roads, Palatine, 
Illinois 60067. Write, visit, 
or telephone 367-3000. 
extension 273. 

Curriculum 
reps, needed 

Two students are presen- 
tly needed to fill the stu- 
dent represenative positions 
for the Curriculum Com- 
mittee. The committee de- 
cides directly on both new 
curriculum courses and re- 
visions of present courses. 

The committee is made up 
of teachers and counselors 
chosen from each depart- 
ment. 

It can be very time con- 
suming and meets every 
Thursday from 12:30 to 3 
p.m. 

Any student interested in 
participating should contact 
Greg LaCosse in the Stu- 
dent Activities Office room 
A337. 



Billiards 
Tournament 

By HEIDI JOHNSON 

A PooW^tfOrnament will 
be held. Jan 8-10, in tM^ 
Games Room. Bldg. A of 
Harper College The tourn- 
ament is open to any student, 
male or female. This year. 
Roy Kearns hopes to involve 
more females in the tour- 
nament. 

Two prizes will be given 
in both first and second 
places Winners will re- 
present Harper in the Stu- 
dent Union Association, of 
which Harper is in region 
eight. They will meet in a 
tournament in Wisconsin, 
which will also include bow- 
ling, billiards, table tennis 
and more. The tournaments 
will be divided in two ca- 
tegories, male and female, 
and winners will go on to 
national competition. 



Harper defeated in over- 
time. 91 -87. Harper's Dave 
SchmJtt led the scaring with 
30 points. Harper shot a very 
fine 58% from the field, al- 
though the Hawks were out- 
rebounded 39-34. 

The last game of the tour- 
nament placed the Hawks 
against Lakeland J.C. The 
Hawks posted a dishearten- 
ing loss, 82-69. The final 
score was not at all repre- 
sentative of the type of game 
that Harper played During 
the first half Harper played 
aggressively, coming up with 
22 rebounds. Harper came up 
4 points ahead at the half 
The second half was a com- 
plete disaster for the Hawks. 
Lakeland shot an unbeliev- 
able 80% from the field in 



which they pulled ahead and 
stayed ahead of Harper for 
good. Coach Bechtold blam- 
ed their loss on fatigue, as 
this was Harper's second 
game of the day. 

Harper placed three play- 
ers on the all tournament 
team, Steve Heldt. Dave 



Schmitt, and Mike Millner. 
more than any other team. 
(Lakeland placed two play- 
ers on the ten man team). 
The tournaments M.VP. 
was Lakeland's 5'9 " guard 
Rick Goznell. The tourna- 
ment's scoring letter' was 
Belleville's Rick Dickhaut. 




Hawk Mike MUlner goes up for two for Harper, against 
DuPage. 



Havfk hoikey team slides over Joliet 
19-0 ia first game of the season 



By L. R. KIEL 

The Hawk Hockey team 
defeated the Wolves of Joliet 
by a score of 19-0 in their 
first conference game of the 
season. 

Leading the Hawk scoring, 
were Dave Connelly, Center, 
and Steve Bird. Right Wing, 
both with hat tricks. 

The scoring started with 
9:18 left In the first period 
when Dave Connelly, with an 
assist from Paul Buck man- 
aged to push the puck past 
the Joliet Goalie 25 seconds 
later, the Hawks in the per- 
son of Kevin Leo again scor- 
ed. 

Goals by Bill Woller. Dave 
Connelly, and Tom Langer. 
made the score 5-0 by the 
end of the first period. 

During the next twenty 
minutes, the Hawks took 
twenty shots on goal with 
goals by Kevin Lio. Jim 
Schneider, Paul Buck, Dave 
Connelly. Kevin Bowens. and 
three by Steve Bird, making 
the score 13-0 by intermis- 
sion 

The Hawks slacked off 



slighUy during the third per- 
iod, allowing themselves only 
19 shots on goal, with scores 
by Tom Black. Marc Walk. 
Jim Schneider, Kevin Bow- 
ens. and two by Dennis Soboj 
Defensively, the Ha wits al- 
lowed Joliet only 11 shots on 
goal for the entire game, 
keeping the puck in Joliet 
territory for the most part 
of the afternoon. 

Coach Robert Downing 
said after the game, "The 
game went as I expected 
Last year, we beat the same 
team 12-0." 

When asked if he consider - 
ed the game to reflect on how 
the rest of the season will 
go. he said, "The first per- 
iod was probably the best 
indication of how the rest of 
the season will go " 

SCORING 
FIRST PERIOD 
HAWKS 

ConneUy 9 18 (assist Buck), 
Lilo8:53. Woller 7:24 (as- 
sist Reborta & Pauly). Con- 
nelly 3:51 (assist Buck L 
Pauly) 
Langer 1:30 



Bird 
Bird 



12 shots on goal 

Joliet 

3 shots on goal 

SECOND PERIOD 

Hawks 

Connelly (16:29. Lio 13:48, 

Bowens 13:18 (assist Pauly 

i Wolk) Bird 12:56 (assist 

Bowens & Langer). Buck 

12:06. Schneider 11 14, 

7 23 (assist Langer). 

1:53 

20 shots on goal 

Joliet 

3 shots on goal 

THIRD PERIOD 

Bowens 19 06. Soboj (assist 

Walk). Walk 12:36. Soboj 

10:15. Black 5 27 (assist 

Langer). Schneider 4:03 

19 shots on goal 

Joliet 

5 shots on goal 

The next home game will 
be January 19. against the 
University of Wisconsin. 
Parkside. at the' Rolling 
Meadows Sports Complex, 
3900 Owl Drive, Rolling 
Meadows Admission is 
$ 50 for students with ID. 
$1 00 adults, and $.25 for 
children. 



N 




Tom Langeni, No. 5, and Jim Schneide-r watch this third period goal 
by No. 9, Keven Bc^wens. (Photo by L. R. Kiel) 



L 



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K/1RBINGER 

William Rainey Harper College. Algonquin and Roselle Roads, Palatine, Illinois 60067, 312-397-3000 



Vol. 7, No. 2|6 



January 26. 1974 



Cf/d Mfflf af Hofptr 



BAHLE BREWING BETWEEN ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 



By DIANE DIBARTOLOMEO 

The word around Harper 
these days, seems to be hush 
hush, as far as the con- 
flict betweentheadministra- 
tlon and the faculty is con- 
cerned'' 

Since the beginning of the 
fall semester, the Faculty 
Senate has been protesting 
on such Issues as student - 
teacher ratio, large lecture 
halls and recently lh»' faculty 
evaluation system By sur- 
verylng the Faculty s de- 
mands, it is not difficult to 
perceive that they are de- 
termined to have a v^oice in 
the running mI ihi- college 
Both the administration and 
the Faculty havfhii it stating 
their views in ihi- form of 
letters that have been circula- 
ting the i->tr .imi-. 



Mr. Robert Powell. Facul- 
ty Senate President, said in 
a recent letter addressed to 
the faculty at Harper that, 
"there is a lack of communi- 
cation between those who 
make the decisions and this 
college and the faculty." 




Determined faculty 
president Powell 



senate 



Powell baseshisclaimson 
past methods the Board has 
taken in view of faculty ap 
peal to alter "the system ' 
He objects to a change of 
an insertion of a paragraph 
added to the Faculty eva- 
luation dociAnent Powell 
states that he nor the faculty 
had no knowledge of it until 
It reached theboard. and was 
then changed TTieparagraph 
Indicated that the faculty 
evaluation results, including 
student evaluation of faculty, 
would be used directly in 
reaching decisions for ten- 
ure, promotion, sabbaticals, 
retention, non-r.'tintion. or 
other matters outlint^l in po- 
licy or at the directionof the 
Board of Trustees 

At the same time Dr * 
Lahti, Harper College Pres- 
ident, stated that the com- 



mittee that studied the fac 
ulty evaluation .kKMim»nt 
stood before the hoard when 
it was. adopted Dr Lahti 
did disclose that at the time 
it was "not a happy docu- 
ment " Both the board and 
the faculty were forced to 
carry it out It was a 

joint agreement, both parties 
were not quite happy, but 
gave it a try " stated l.ahti 
The 'president explained 
that if the faculty Senate ob- 
jects to this present system 
or any other there is a spe- 



MeGIoihJin's our representative 




By L.R.KIEL 

January 10. Student Re- 
presentative Gerald Mc- 
Glothlin attended his first 
board meeting in his offi- 
cial capacity the lia son be- 
tween the Harper College 
Board of Trustees, and the 
Student Body 

In this first meeting. Mc- 
Glcthlin found the Board 
members to be "Open 
minded", and described his 



to fill the vacancy on the 
board brought about by the 
resignation of Ms AnnaLee 
Fjellberg. and an executive 
session, and an Educational 
Board meeting. 

The Educational Board 
consists of the same people 
who are on the Board of 
Trustees," it is different in 
that they considermattersof 
the Educational aspect of 
college, rather than the busl- 




to 



' Gerald McGIothlin, Harper s first student-elect 
be seated on the Board of Trustees. 

ness end erf It which is co- 



attendance as being fruitful 
In that he "sat back and 
absorbed as much informa- 
tion as I could for future 
reference." 

Since that time, hehasat- 
tended a closed session for 
the selection of the person 



vered in a different meeting 
When asked if he thinks 
he will be able to <^Pt any 
of the students' ideas through 
the Board, Gerald McGIo- 
thlin replied, "Yes. at least 
one will be through shortly." 



One of the issues that he 
stated as part of his cam- 
paign platform was that of 
changing the calendar to one 
that would see the first se- 
mester end before Christ- 
mas, to help alleviate the 
post vacation, pre-exam 
b lues When a sked about the 
possibility of getting this 
idea through the board for the 
next year. McGIothlin stated: 
"When I started, it was im- 
possible, now I thir* it's got 
a lot of hope to go through." 
This question of the cal- 
endar wasvotedonprevious- 
ly by the Board of Trustees, 
and theyhaddecidedthatthey 
were going to stay with the 
same typeof calendar that we 
used this year The one 
where the semester ends 
after the break. 

In the beginning of his 
term. McGIothlin says that 
he received 'Minor bits of 
influence from various ad- 
ministrators on the issue of 
attending ExecutiveSessions 
of the Board, making mo- 
tions, and seconding mo- 
tions After researching, 
and explaining how other 
schools are allowing this, 
some of the administrators 
have changed their at- 
tiudes. " 

When asked if he felt he 
will be able to function in 
this position, he responded 
"I will be able to telJ better 

(Turn to Page 6) 



Harper College 
Dr. LahU 



president 



clal outlet structured for just 
this purpose The alterna- 
tive is the Grievance Com 
mittee After continued stu 
dy on the issue, the faculty 
can present their case be- 
fore the board with a solid 
report to back up their ap- 
peal Lahti mentioned that 
it would be futile for the 



faculty to go before the board 
without having first passed 
through the Grievance Com- 
mittee He said that the 
"board is not equipped or 
qualified to handle these im- 
portant problems, without 
examining the facts The 
place for involvement is not 
at a Board Meeting." add- 
ed Lahti 

Bu Powell argues that 
the "Committee work is ig- 
nored, and by the time it 
comes to the board it has 
changed." Referring back to 
the faculty evaluation docu- 
ment. Powell stated, "In- 
deed the faculty doesn't even 
know who made the decision 
to alter the evaluation do- 
cument. Nor do we know who 
makes many other decisions 
at Harper Time and time 
again we feed reports into the 
executives suites on the third 
floor of A building, from 
which the reports emerge 
altered as executive or 
Board policy, or else dis- 
appear ' ' 

Is the present system wor- 
king^ 

"If it is used effectively." 
replies Dr Lahti. 

Disagreeing Powell offers 
five recommendations that 
he claims are already in 
effect at other progressive 
colleges 

In a letter addressed to the 
Harper faculty. Powell re- 

(Tum to Page 6) 



Wavf^t eyes setond tampns 



Harper College s quest for 
a second campus has taken 
the form of negotiating for a 
plot of l#nd owned by the 
Mayo Foundation 

This land is located on 
the Northwest corner of Pa- 
latine and Schoenbfck Roads 
in Arlington Hi'ights * 

Last Monday night, the 
College was given .» 6«> day 
extension in their request 
for reservation of the land 
for theeducational purposes 

Until .5 p m of ihat day. 
Harper officials had been 
prepared to drop their re- 
quest, that is until ihey re- 
ceived authorizalion from 
the state board of higher 
education Thi.s authoriza- 
tion came in the form of a 
last minute phone c; all from 
the state board, at which 



time the college was assured 
that the entire matter of a 
second campus for Harper 
would be taken up in a meet- 
ing of the higher board on 
March 5 

Mayo officials originally 
objected to the sight desig- 
nation, especially without the 
authorization from the state 
for the second campus, be- 
cause it would mean a tie up 
of the development of the 
land 

Under the Illinois law. 
once a parcel of land has 
been set asideforeducation- 
al purposes, another pro- 
posal for the land rannot 
be drawn up and submitted 
for a year 

The 146 acre site is valued 
at $25,000 to $.50,000 per 
acre, depending on how the 
land is zoned. 



> 



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page 2 



T€ 



H>I^NGER 



January 28. 1974 




Fourteen tacos up and an Alka-Seltzer to go 



Taco Champ Jim Pink, 
sored by the practical 



By LARRY FREDRICK 

The social event of *the 
century was held at Harper 
last Jan. 9, and if attend- 
ance is any indication, it 
was a rousing success. Nine- 
teen people wallowed in tacos 
for one half hour in an at- 
tenpt to change the record 
books. An estimated 500 

persons came and yelled, 
screamed, and encouraged 
their favorite "eater" to- 
wards the "glory" one 
deserves after such an ex- 
hibition. More than stom- 
ach aches were bestowed up- 
on the winners as they ate 



their way to a $20 prize, 
awarded to the clubs they 
represented. 

The Learning Resource 
Center Video-taped thecon- 
test and WHCM was on hand 
to do the play-by-play ac- 
count. But, the big thrill was 
that WLS-TV (channel 7) 
came out and filmed it for 
the 6 o'clock news. 

The contest ended in a tie 
by Jim Fink (eating for the 
Practical Nurses Club) and 
Dave Hanneman (2nd Year 
Nurses Club) with both of 
them having consumed 14 
tacos. Bill Sahli (Ski Club), 
who was favored, only was 



able to put away nine tocos, 
while an underdog, Janet 
Rocke (Psych. Club) knock- 
ed off anastonistiingU.Last 
place was taken by our Stu- 
dent Senate President Bob 
Hayhurst, who struggled 
through every bite of five. 
The contest has strongpos- 
sibilitles of becoming an an- 
nual event, so you can all 
start practicing. 

Jim Fink, one of the win- 
ners, received an added 
bonus. He had an agreement 
with the Practical Nurses 
Club that if he won (which 
he did) he would get a hot 
date with the Practical 
Nurse of his choice. 



To pool or not to pool ? 



By DIANE DIRARTOLOMEO 

Have you ever missed a 
class because you found it 
impossible to get a rideone 
morning, afternoon or eve- 
ning? 

If a new plan called Com- 
puterized Car Pooling Isln- 
ititated at Harper, students 
will find it impossible to 
even miss one of their 
ciss8«s. if ttey play their 



PANTS FOR 
HIM & HER 




1^ 



Woman't &■•• 5 to It 

Men* SiMt 28 to 42 Waist 

InaMm* 28In.to36In. 

BOYS SIZES 6 to 18 



TU^IUIBgS 



cards right. 

The new deal is being 
looked into by the Student 
Activities office. Whether it 
is going to be initiated or 
not. depends on the sup- 
port and response of the stu- 
dents 

In order to participate in 
the car pool a student need; 
ing or offering a ride will 
fill out an IBM card, listing 
their phone number, zip code 
and the days and time he 
needs to be at school. The 
information that he has filled 
out will be listed in the 
HARBINGER or another 
source for the students to 
refer to. The student offering 
the ride would call up the 
number of the student whose 
zip code corresponds with 
his Names and addresses 
will not bepublished, but will 
be used as follow ups. 

Computerized Car Pooling 
is presently being ulitized 
at Northern Illinois Uni- 
versity. N.I.U, reports that 
student response is good. 
Since students who attend 
Harper commute only, there 
are expectations ofthenew 
system receiving favorable 
support 

Presently there is a ser- 
vice for students in needed a 
ride to refer to The ride 
board located in A building 
next to the pool tables, has 
been in operation for ayear 
and a half. The failure of the 



ride board to attract more 
student sipport is believed 
due to the fact that Harper 
students are not aware of its 
existence or location. By ini- 
tiating the Computerized 
CarPool information will be 
readily s implied and made 
available, and in short be 
jnore efficient. Students will 
not have to go through the 
red tape of the present sjrs- 
tem. The n^w system also 
involves students who of- 
fer rides, more so than the 
present syste m. 

The success of Computer- 
ized Car Pooling being ini- 
tiated at Harper depends on 
the response and support 
of all. If you are interested 



in participating, fill out the 
survey below and drop it 
off in the response boxes 
located at the following lo- 
cations by Friday, February 
1: F building - library and 
vending areas, first and 
third floors, E building - 
lobby, D building - knuckle 
areas, first and second 
floors; A building - cafe- 
teria and lounge. 

CAR POOL? 
I would be interested in 
using a computerized car 
pool. 

Yes No 

Have you listed yourself 
on the present ride board? 
Yes No 



College-credit tests offered 



Harper College in Palatine 
will offer a series of Sat- 
urday - morning sessions 
next semester to help per- 
sons prepare for tests that 
may give them college credit 
for knowledge gained through 
practical experience. 

The sessions will be held 
Feb 2 through May 25 from 
9 am to noon, and are in- 
tended as a review of ma- 
terial covered by College 
Level Examination Program 



"Focus: Northwest" to discoss 
role of community paper 



"The Role of the Com- 
munity Newspaper" is dis- 
cussed on Sunday. Febraury 
3, when "Focus: North- 
west," the Harper radio pro- 
gram is aired on WWMM 
(FM), 92 7 at 8 a.m. The 
program is rebroadcast at 
9 p.m. 

Moderator Cynthia Tiv- 
ers. Director of Communi- 
cations at Forest Hospital in 
Des Plaines and a freelance 
writer, covers many areas of 
the community newspaper 



with panel members Tom 
Wellman. chief editorial 
writer for Paddock Publi- 
cations; Bruce Srachta, news 
editor for The Copely Re- 
cord; and Steve McCray, fea- 
ture editor, Barrington 
Press. 

Harriet Kandelman is pro- 
ducer-director of the weekly 
"Focqs: Northwest" radio 
series which originates from 
Harper College s Office oi 
Community Relations. 



tests Registrations for the 
sessions will be accepted 
1 1) rough Feb. 2 at the Har- 
per Continuing EducationOf- 
fice. 

Those wishing to take the 
CLEP exams, administered 
at Harper each month, may 
call the colleg's Office of 
Testing Services. 397-3000 
ext 341. for information and 
dates. 

The college also will of- 
fer a refresher course next 
semester for registered 
nurses who have been inac- 
tive in their profession for 
five or more years. 

The class will meet on 
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 
from 7 - 10 p.m . Jan. 29 
to June' 3. The in -district 
registration fee is $75 and 
out -of -district residents pay 
$177 75 plus a $5 lab fee 
The course will include both 
classroom instruction and 
supervised clinical exper- 
ience in local hospitals. 

Registrations are being 
accepted now at the college 
at Algonquin and Roselle 
roads. Information Is avail- 
able from the Harper Con- 
tinuing Education Office, 
397-3000, ext 301. 




Representing the second- 
vear nurses, winner Dave 
Hanneman 



Who's Who 
nay be you 

Awards are available in 
the form of financial assis- 
tance, and listing in the 
WHO'S WHO AMONG STU- 
DENTS IN AMERICAN JUN 
lOR COLLEGE PR(X}RAMS 

The financial assistance 
comes under Student Achie- 
vement Recognitionprogram 
sponsored by the Continental 
Illinois National Bank and 
Trust Company of Chicago 
Cash awards are in the form 
of $100 for the campus win- 
ner. $250 for the District 
Winners., and $1000 for the 
state winners! 

In the competition for the 
Who's who award, there is a 
listing in the national publi- 
cation WHO S WHO AMONG 
STUDENTS IN AMI-KICAN 
JUNIOR COLLEGK PRO 
GRAMS 

Applications for the.sc a 
wards are due on the 2S of 
this month Applitalions. 
and further information is 
available ineitherlhelMace 
ment and Aids office, room 
A.364. or the Stuck-nt Acli 
vities Office room A.i.«7 



Open tryovts 

On March 8 and 9 the 
HARPER STUDIO PLAYERS 
will present their first 
Spring production. "Arsenic 
and Old Lace". It is a play 
in three acts, written by 
Joseph Kesselrlng. about 
two sweet old ladies that 
relieve their visitors from 
the burdens of the world, 
by poisoning them and then 
burying them In their cellar 
(referred to as Panama). 

It is a play worth seeing 
and can be er\Joyed even 
more by visualizing what 
takes place through the 
eyes of the actor. Tryouts 
are being held in room F- 
304 on Jan. 29 at 12:30. 
Jan 30 at 12:30 and 6:30. 
and Jan. 31 at 12:30 and 
6:30. Students Interested 
In acting or helping with i 
set-design, sound, lighting. 
etc. are invited to attend 



January 28, 1974 



*H 



H>f?BINGER 



A legend in pop music 



page 3 



The Association to entertain Harper 



beven and a half years 
ago, in Los Angeles, six 
musician-singers from var- 
ied musical backgrounds be- 
gan what has become a liv- 
ing legeiKi in the world of 
contemporary entertain- 
ment. 

The group is most noted 
for their recordings of Win- 
dy aiKl Cherish. They pres- 
ently record for Columbia 
Records onthe 'Mums' label. 

Who's the group? 

The Association will ap- 



Glguere, Jim Yester, Mau- 
rice Miller and David 
Vaught. This assemblage of 
musician-singers has sev- 
eral gold records to their 
credit and wrote the music 
for the movie Goodbye Col- 
umbus. 

In November, '67. the Aca- 
demy of Recording Arts & 
Sciences awarded them 
three Grammy nominations 
and they were voted the 
Number One Pop Group in 




Members of the Associations include: Jules Ale- 
xander. Ted Bluechel, Russ Gl^ere, Jim Yester. 
Maurice Miller, and David Vaught. 



pear in concert on Friday, 
February 1 , at 8 p m in the 
College Center Lounge. 

Members of theAssocia- 
tioo include. Jules Alexan- 
der, Ted Bluechel. Jr., Russ 



the Nation by the Bill Gav- 
in Radio- Record Congress 
Unlike many contempor- 
ary musicians The Associa- 
tion doesnotdepend on studio 
electronic devices for their 



successful sound and has 
always had a reputation for 
excelling in live perfor?h- 
ances. 

New drummer, Maurice 
Miller, whose credits are 
many, played with greats 
as George Shearing and 
Paul Horn, and also was a 
member of the Watts 103rd 
Street Band. His baritone 
voice only enlunces the 
great Association sound. 
New bass player David 
Vaught has toured with 
Paul Williams, Helen Red- 
dy and was himself a mem- 
ber of Rosebud These two 
new associates bring back 
together the seven man 
band, as as 'Record World' 
editor Spence Berland wrote 
in a review of the Associ- 
ation at their recent Trou- 
badour engagement, "Con- 
sidering the fact that they 
are the greatest group of 
this type In the history of 
the work]. It is Just the 
beginning." 

Advance tickets dan be 
purchased for $2 00 with 
Harper ID and $2 50 for 
the public Prices at the 
door are. $2.50 with Har- 
per ID and $3.00 to th« 
public. 



Ester Rabchuk appointed coordinator 
of Senior Citizens Program here 



By SUE POLLACK 

Harper's student body will 
be expanding even more this 
spring to include the area s 
senior citizens in a new 
program designed to re- In- 
tegrate them into the main- 
str^im of life 

Mrs Esther Rabchuk. co- 
ordinator of the newly - 
established Harper College 
Senior Citizens Program, 
explained how this idea took 
place. It Is an offshoot, she 
said, of the "Expanding Hor- 
izons for Women courses 
offered here the last few 
years. Dr Jack Fuller. Dean 
of Continuing Education, 
asked Mrs Rabchuk to put 
together a similar course 
for senior citizeas 

The first step in its de- 
velopment was to collect an 
Advisory Committee which 
now consists of nineteen 
community residents who 
are either senior citizeas 
themselves or people who 
work with seniors 

Once this was organized. 
a conference was held at 
Harper in November to de- 
termine what directions the 
committee should take The 
participants were experts 
on the seniors needs, for 
half of them . again, were 
seniors themselves and half 
were the peoph who sctm- 
them. Topics ranging from 
education. spiritual well- 
being, and retirement roles 
to income, hrmsing. trans- 
portation and nutritionwere 



discussed at the conference 
and were also recorded for 
later use 

"It's important for the 
seniors to tell us what they 
want. Mrs Rabchukstated 
"We have to let them relate 
their problems and experi 
ences hefore we plan any 
thing for them or tell them 
what to do .After this. sh«' 
went on. the thirdstepcanbe 
achieved, and cnasHiiKntlx . 
a course entitled •Mxpiipd 
IngHorizoas forS* niorC'it- 
izens ' has l»»i(jnif part of 
Harper's spring «-iirriculum 

The course i.s intended to 
be a 'conscious- raising ' 
experience for the seniors, 
to show them how to plan 
realistically for the future 
using their knowledge of the 
past A major noal is that 
they will hicome confident 
of their own abilities and 
potentials and aware of the 
second careers available 
through completion of some 
of Harper's regular courses 
The new course is also 
part of Mrs Rabchiik's hope 
that the college will provide 
seminars, workshops, and 
classes for the people who 
work with the seniors She 
believes they should go 
through the same kind of 
training and development 
that is required of the peo- 
ple who work with children 
Furthermore. this pro- 
gram is important in its 
relation to the entire com- 
munity, for Mrs Rabchuk 
believes that all residents. 



and not lusi the senior 
citizens, should be educat - 
ed In the process of ;i«ing 
and how it fits into the 
total picture of life. 

With recent census fig 
ures indicating that the 
number of p<>ople over age 
75 has increased by :u 
per cent, more and more 
seniors areixperiencinglhe 
emptiness that a !ifeofearl\ 
retirement can bring Har 
per is offering an alter 
native to that emptiness so 
that the citizens who have 
developed our society can 
receive more of the dignity 
an appreciation they de 
serve 

Many persons have ex 
pressed interest in the new 
program. Mrs Rabchuk 
said, and more people need 
to be informed about it 
The senior citizens class 
planned for three Monda\ 
afternoons this semester. !.■- 
free of charge Information 
is available through the Ad- 
missions Office. 



RESEARCH 



Thousands of Topics 
$275 per page 
Send for irour up to date. 160 page, 
mail order catalog Enclose $1 00 
to cover postage (delivery time is 
1 to 2 days) 

RESEARCH ASSISTANCE, INC. 

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LOS ANGELES. CALIF 90025 
(213i 477 8474 or 477-5493 

Our rtt(irc'< mitcnal it lOld (or 
rn«»rch assitt«rict only 



GILENI>1R 
OFEI/TNTS 



On Campus — 

The "Mad Mountain Mime Troupe", featuring mime and 
music. Jan. 30. 12 noon, in tlie Lounge, free. 

Senate Mtg.. Jan. 31, 12:30, A-242-A. 

The Association, In Concert, Fri.. Feb. 1, 8 p.m. Col- 
let Center Lounge. Tickets for students with I. D. are 
$2 in advance. $2.50 at the door. 

Basketball, away game against McHenry, Feb. 2, 
2 p.m. 

Hockey, home game, Feb. 2. at 4 p.m. Harper vs. 
College of DuPage at Rolling Meadows Sports Com- 
plex. 

Wrestling, home game. Jan. 30, at 7 p.m. Harper va. 
McHenry. ''^-^ 

Theatre — 

"That Championship Season", wih Forrest Tucker. 

Studebaker The. Ph. 922-2973. 
"Da", with John McGlver. at the Ivanhoe. Ph. 248- 

6800 or OR 2- 2711. 
"The Tooth of Crime", at the Goodman. Ph. 236- 

2337. 
"Man of La Mancha ", with Lee Pelty. Candlelight 

Dinner Playhouse. Ph. 458-7373. 
"Call Me By My Rightful Name", with Don Murray. 

Pheasant Run Playhouse, Ph. 584-1454. 

Musk- 
The Four Seasons. Feb. 16, Arle Crown The. 
Stephen Stills, Mar. 8. Auditorium The. 
Johnny Winter. Amphitheatre. Mar. 13. 
The Lettermen. Arie Crown, Mar. 15. 
Two Generations of Brubeck. Mar. 16, Audiloirum The 
Seals & Crofts. Arie Crown. Mar. 16 & 17. 

Lecture — 

Dr. Susan Korbel. aasodale professor at Harper Col- 
lege and microwave reaerach expert, to speak at meet- 
ing of Pollution & Environmental Problems, Jan. 
30, 8:30 p.m. For more information. Ph. 381-6695, 
Catherine (julgg. 



forn SELF-HYPNOSIS OuUkly 

Direct your sub conscience to solve your problems 
OverweJcht, drues, smoking, etc. 
Improve your memory, study habits, sports 

GAIN SELF CONFIDENCE 

Jack Korbel 537-4607 



An Invitation to Transfer Students 

DePaul 

UNIVERSITY 

7th Annual Open House 
and Career Day 

Sunday. February 10—1 p.m. -4 p.m. 
2323 N. Seminary Avenue 



The Office of 
Admissions 




DePaul Universily 

Suite I 

25 E Jackson Boulevard 



LlIir".I»L*JW II 1111*11. Miilli 



{ 



N. 



V 



-I 



page 4 



I 



Once again. It appears as if the adminiatration is go- 
ing to attempt to expand witiiout first evaluating what we 
already have. i 

During the last few days, the Harper College Adminis- 
traUon has been busy working for a second campus, 
or rather the procurement of land that would be held in 
reserve. 

It would normally -be a valiant effort on the part of 
the Administration to display such farsightedness as to 
plan for an expanding growth in enrollment, and to plan 
on serving the student body to the best possible stand- 
ards. However, we must look at the present situation that 
this college finds Itself in before we praise the board. 

At this Ume, there is a conflict between the Adminis- 
tration and the faculty. Therfi) is aUo a need for a new 
fieldhouse 

How can the Administration plow forth with such 
reckless abandon in the procurement of a second cam- 
pus, when the way things are going now, there may not 
even be a first one? It would appear that the Adminis- 
tration has lost sight of their primary mission here, and 
that U to provide the student body with a good edu- 
cation. 

If the CoUege, and the Higher College Board in this 
state cannot provide us with an athletk facUity, how can 
they provide us with something as large as an entirely 
new campus? It would seem that the Administration has 
become overcome with the idea of a good looking 
campus over the necessity of a good functioning college, 
where one can obtain an education without having to 
worry about such things as dissent among the faculty, 
and lack of athletic facilities. 

When are we as studenU at Harper CoUege going to 
get an Administration that gives more than lip service 
to the idea of Education for the Student Body? 



Shid«nH who wish fo d«lv« info Iho ins and 
ouh of this collogo. ttudonh who wont tho 
whoU h^ufh rovoolod to tho world, or stu- 
donfs who wont o position on a vibrant, 
thriving nowi staff of a dynamic collogo 
nowtpopor. H you aro such a porson com* 
•o Ih* Horbingor offico A367 or call 397- 
3000 nt. 272, 




K 



H/«^NGER 




Pxlltor-in -chief 
Managing Editor 
Business Manager 
Activities Editor 
Photo Editor 

Cartoonists 



Diane DlRartolo..ieo 
L. K. Kiel 
Gary Zdeb 
Heidi Johnson 
Chuck Zemeske 

Joyce Tarwld, Juan Nun€ 
Dennis Murray 



,,. ^., Contributing Staff: 

yn Kissam . Mary Beth Christy. Greg Conwav Sue 
Pollack. Bill Whitehead. Glenn Lewi„. L^^vLttc^ 
and Rkhard Kusnierek. 

Advisor: 
Mr. Sturdevant 



The HARBINGER is the student publication for the 
Harper College campus community, published weekly 
except during holidays and mid-terms. All opinions ex 
pressed on the editorial page or in the columns are 
those of the writer, and are not necessarily those of the 
college, its administration, faculty or student body. 
For information on advertising, rates and publica- 
tion schedule, call or write Harbinger Business Of- 

William Rainey Harper College. Algqnquin and 
Roselle Rds., Palatine. Illinois 60067. Phone Aun> 
b-r 397-3(X)0. cxt. 272 and 460. 



T€ 



H>I?BINGER 



January 28, 1974 



A II you really need is a heart 

While each man is unique, there exists a common bond between all men 
the bond of blood. There is only one source of vital human blood, this source is 
the human body. 

Throughout the nation. January, 1974 has been proclaimed as National Volun- 
teer Blood Donor Month 

Citizens of each community are asked to take about 45 minutes off from 
their routine acUvities, to donate a pint of blood at their neighborhood blood bank 
or hospital. 

The Cooperative Blood Replacement Plan, which has been serving the 
Chicago area for 17 years with its family blood replacement program urges 
that community- minded citizens become blood donors during this month 

Because of inclement weather and illness, many volunteer blood donors 
often postpone their visit to the blood bank during January. Blood donors 
are expecially needed because of the Illinois labeling law designating pur- 
chased blood. The professional, paid donor, now cannot make up the slack 
n our blood sipply as he has done in years previous Most physicians are re- 
luctant to use purchased blood for transfusions because of future liabilities 

When a blood donation Is given, persons may Join the Cooperative Blood 
Replacement Plan, which In Its 17 years has assured more than 250 000 persons 
memberehf ^'*^ replacement at no cost to them during the term of their 

»« »T^i^ "^^T ^"^ ■ membership in CHRP offers the benefits of not having 
J}?? ■ replacement donor and not having to pay for the blood and processina 
should tragedy or Illness strike the family CHRP does not clilTgeiteermS* 
bers any participation fee in connecUon with blood repUcement benefits 
And importanUy. blood replacement benefits will be arranged for bv CBRP 
at any hospital in the United States should the family be on vacation or even 
relocate during the term of membership 

CurrenUy there are 66 Chicago area hospitals and blood banks which are 
members of CBRP The Plan may be Joined at any one of theJT T^flnd ou? 
the name of the member hospital or blood bank nearest you call 477-7500 
or write to CBRP. 2058 N Clark St . Chicago. Ill 60614 

CBRP is associated with the American Association of Blood Banks and 
iL'^V,!!!?!"^ *" ^ recenUy launched Chicago Area Unified Blood Program 
Be ablood donor - All you really need Is heart ruuram. 




Conterned stvdent offers soggestions 



Letter to the Editor: 

I have sat back long 
enough, watched the faculty 
and administration fight over 
too- large classes, student 
evaluation, and the threat 
that Harper will turn Into an 
"overblown, dispirited, and 
generally bad institution" 
Whether this Institution will 
become overblown I can't 
say because I don't know 
what It means, but either 
does anyone else It is 
utterly absurd to thir* that 
this institution could "be- 
come" dispirited after look- 
ing at the attendance at the 
sports events, dances, and 
student senate meetings. 



Nevertheless. I don't want 
to see Harper turn into a 
generally bad institution, and 
I offer a suggestion to keep 
us at a high level of aca- 
demic sunding Why doesn't 
the school investigate which 
classes have th« highest 



drop-out and/or flunk -out 
rate? If that was done then 
we would all have an idea 
of which courses, (and tea- 
chers), should be sent to 
pasture. 

Name Withheld 



Ho-hom anatlier boring semester 



Harbinger 

announces 
new addition 

The Harbinger will be 
offering space In a special 
new column for Harper 
faculty. They may voice any 
opinion they feel Is relevant 
to Harper students, the ad- 
ministration or faculty 
members The title of the 
column is Faculty Feedback. 
Any faculty member may 
submit their column to the 
Harbinger office in A 367 
no later than the Wednesday 
prior to Monday's publica- 
tion date. There will be a 
n^mum of 300 words due 
to space requirements. 



Ah yes. dear fellow Har- 
per students, another fine 
senester is once agsln upon 
us There are soon going 
to be things growing outside 

While this Spring Se- 
mester might Just be a good 
one. most of you people out 
there will choose to remain 
Ignorant of this fact, and 
choose to hide in oblivion 
and apathy 

Some of you are saying. 
"Jesus Christ, another let 
ter on apathy" Those of 
you are beyond help, 
so please don't wear your- 
selves out by reading this 
If you read on. thart there is 
still hope for you. 

There are plenty of things 
going on at this place, but 
let us look at things realis- 



tically True there are more 
things at a four year In- 
stltiAion They got the bread 
for them. We don't 

Of course you don't pay as 
much to go here either 

There is a choice around 
here Either you can sit 
around and say "Well, it 
looks like another good day 
to do nothing but sit here 
with my finger up my rec- 
tum." or you can say. 
There must be something 
around here to do " Then 
go out and do it. 

Why not. No one will 
bite your head off. or do you 
Just want to be one of the 
conformists who won't put 
out? 

Name witheld on request 



We welcome and encourage letters to the 
editor. They are subject to editing and con- 
densation to meet space and style requirements, 
and each must bear the writer'n signature aiif 
address. Names may be withheld from publi- 
cation at the writer's request, but signed letters 
will take precedence. 



January 28, 1974 



T€ 



A trip tbroigli tlit stists 



H>1RBINGER 



page 5 



'*Mad Mountain Mime Treupe" 



The "Mad Mountain Mime 
Troupe". featuring mime 
and music with C W Met- 
calf. Tom Pierce and Tim 
Bays, will be at Harper Col- 
lege. Jan 30 from 12-1:30 
pm . in the College Center 
Lounge. Music brings out 
feelings that no words can 
describe, and nupae , th rough 
silence, doesthisalso Mime 
and music, together, is a 



sensory experience, making 
the invisible visible, theaud- 
ible. real. 

C. W. Metcalf is one of 
the few pantomime artists 
In the world He has start- 
ed one of the few schools 
of mime in the world He 
has performed for colleges, 
universities, asylums, pris- 
ons and theatres Present- 
ly, he is mime artist -in -res- 



idence at Florida State Un- 
iversity. Tom Pierce ran 
away to Join the circus, 
where he later met C W 
and began to study mime. 
Tim Bays, with acoustic 
voice and guitar, provides 
the music, the mellow mad- 
ness that is the heart of Mad 
Mountain The price of this 
trip through the senses? 
Its free 




!Vlad .Mountain is mellow madness. 



By DIANE DiBARTOLOMEO 

For 45 minutes I stood 
shivering inthe freezing rain 
with the wind whi.stlingat my 
back Allneofanxiousbodies 
wrapped around (he peri- 
meter of the theatre like 
clinging vines 1 entered the 
dark threshold of no return 

What kind of people at- 
tend these bizarre enter- 
tainment shows"' Within 15 
minutes I found myself sur- 
rounded in the company of a 
roomful of curious thrill 
seeking, popcorn and gum 
Ifc-op eating freaks 

The movie was none other 
than the most controversial 
and publicized^ shocker of 
the year-- "The Exorcist 
based on William Peter Blat 
ty s best seller The movie 
depicts the brutal possession 
of a 12-year-old girl by the 
devil It is completely urip 
ping and invites ihe partici 
pat ion of the audience The 
conflict between priest and 
demon mixe.s fact and fan 
tasy so well that one might 
think the movie was actual- 
ly true 

The limited number of 
theatres that have been able 
to afford the movie have 



Tht Exordst: ShwU yov believe it or not? 



reported grossing an un- 
usually high $200,000 in the 
film s first week, and its 
performances continue to 
sell out 

With the long waiting line 
to get into the show, one 
more line is running a close 
second The washrooms have 
somehow become a part of 
the movie Managers of 
those theatres running The 
Exorcist have reported 
numerous faintings during 
showings of the movie since 
it opened in lafe n»rem 
ber 

Presently there are six 
knowTi cases of people un- 
der psychiatic care after 
viewing the show 

With this in mind I fear- 
ed that at any moment I 
would soon lose my sanity 
The near dozen terrifying 
and gross events in The 
Exorcist" were paced even- 
ly during the run of the 
movie, supposedly for the 
audience to regain their 
sanity between these 
scenes 

The curiosity was over 
whelming Mam of those 
who attended the movies as 
myself had preconceived 
notions of what was going 
to happen Most viewers had 



already heard the gossip 
and highlights or had read 
the Iwok prior to seeing 
the movie They were not as 
shocked as those who first 
viewed it. but had to see it 
for themselves anyway 

I will be thoroughly dis- 
appointed if the make up 
artists do not Ro down in 
history with such famous 
artists as Van Gogh and De 
Vinci The effect of their 
work had a tremendous im 
pact on the audience Their 
artistry succeeded in to- 
tally 'grossing out every- 
one there This critic should 
not be surpristHJ if the cos 
metics used by these artists 
are not out on the market 
for this Halloween 

The acting talent of Lin 
da Blair was superb She 
played the rote of Regan, a 
12 -year old girl who was 
possessed by the devil Her 
facial expressions were 
enough to give anyone the 
chills But, more convinc 
ing was the young actresses 
performance at the beginning 
of the movie, which was un 
fortunately limited Watch 
for her in the future, she 
holds a promising career 
There were only three oth 
er outsunding performers 



By GREG WALLIS 

The Concert on i-ruiay 
January 4th was opened by 
Ed Holstein. a semi -regu- 
lar at the Karl of Old town 
on North ^Vells in Chicago 
Ed had no/trouble at all in 
relaxing the packed hixjse 
with his wild tales of him 
self and other Chicago mil 
sicians. like .Inhn Prine and 
Steve Goodman He went on 
to give a very humorous 
music iai analysis of Chica 
goland's fnistrjited »juitar 
players, and finished his set 
with a sing along version of 
■Rufus^ R>«.stis .Jnhivson 
Brown" 

Headlining the I ! ulay 
night concert waslAaiusloii s 
own BillQiiait man uhft with 
the release of his <iil)uiii 
is finally receiving mucli of 
the acclaim ihat he so r inhi 
ly deserves I was\er> hyped 
up for his r(-turnengiik;<iii«rit 
at Harpers lounge llis 
acoustics are n-niaikabiv 



Quateman starts New Year with a bang 



similar to those oi ,i i oun 
try barn I was railn r .lis 
appointed with the . muc s 
performan* n Tx i i 'u 




Bill Quateman 



acoustics arnj herMii«Ht of the 
painfully Untd volume that 
was usmI hy the yroup 
Quateman s musie islhought 
prnvokinH mnodn^ii Kir which 
when played with a tasteful 
hiend between instruments 
and vocals can aive you 
goosebumps I m sorry to 
say that the performance 
given t)v hill Quateman 
on the tth gave n« a head 
K hi instead of Koose 

t)umps 

I have to agree with most 
of the people that 1 vi talked 
to between the niglii i>f the 
concert and now that a! 
though the music put «wl 
by Bill Quateman and his 
arojp was very u.mmI and 
I hey showed a lot i»f taieni 
the volume was nmch loo 
loud to be ti ul.\ < njoyabh 
I just wish that fore ol Ih. 
groups playinK in Mai p«r , 
lounge woulil -'.I ' .icniif 
Ing s(^ .■ . ,1,,!!,. 

to give us a helter quality 
of sound 



who related well to the au- 
dience Ellen Burstyn who 
played the role of Mrs Mac- 
Neil, the successful actress, 
concerned mother and 
divorcee: Jay Miller who 
played the discouraged 
priest. and the authentic 
and heart warming Italian 
mother of the priest Jayson 
Miller is the successful 
playwrite of the Champion 
ship Season, this is his first 
acting debut All were con 



vincing in their parts 

If you don t mind obscene 
language, gross insinua- 
tions, shocking and fright- 
ening movies and in short, 
are able to remember you're 
only sitting in the audience, 
the movie is recommended 
'The Exorcist rated R. 
succeeds in getting its 
audience involved. both 
during the show and after. 
It is an experience one will 
never forf^t 



For adventure see Papillon 



By L. FREDRICK 

Every year, about this 
time, their is a massive 
flood of new feature films to 
hit Chicag^-and the suburbs, 
and this year is certainly 
no exception Their was no 
less than 17 films released 
within the last month The 
reasoning being that a lot of 
school kids will have plenty 
of extra time and money to 
spend (or waste) on them 

But. not a penny will be 
misspent if you takethetlme 
out to see "Papillon" 
starring Steve McQueen and 
Dustin Hoffman Based on 
the best -selling true story of 
Henry Charrlere. It entails 
an adventure -escape story 
that Is not for the squeamish 
Scenes range from a de- 



m eani ng p rlson camp to a le - ^ 
per colony and ending atDe- 
vils Island This 2- 1/2 hr. 
film will guarantee you 
sweaty palms and that "sink- 
ing feeling '" as you watch 
Steve McQueen try and try 
again for that cool breeze 
of freedom Escape seems 
to be within his grasp but 
not to become a handhold 
"Papillon ". at a cost d 
about 13 million dollars, 
rates as one of the most 
expensive films of the de- 
cade, and promises to be in 
the running for Film of the 
Year 

So. I heartily encourage 
you to forget the "blood -& 
-guts Western reruns " for 
an evening and go see "Pa- 
pillon ". but not If you have 
a weak heart 



The '50s Musical Comedy is 
CHICAGO'S BIGGEST HIT! 



n 

Roitttrout and roody' Everyon* tliould Mvor thu rart 
•vtnt' It thould appeal not only to thoM who want to ichool 
in the SO'i but to othar agat at «yaH" 

GLtNNA SVSE. SUN TIMES 

v^.l^L^i*-""^' f U'^'«I«T, RAUNCHIEST EVENING 
YOU VE EVER SPENT IN THE THEATRE, I LOVED IT' " 

ROY LEONARD. WON 





^^^-^ 



1" 



^^ 



TICKETS AT BOX OFFICE. 
BY MAIL & TICKETRON 
Bon Offtca Opan Daily ia9 PM (Ekc. Sun.) 



"Thuft 



rwBT 



^ri a> Sat Evn 8 30 



Wad MitinMj 2 PM 



Sat Matir>aa» 2 PM 



OflCM 

■W55 



i9 90 



$6 90 



«7 90 




BY MAIL Enc stamped self addressed env.with check or 
money order payable to SHUBERT THEATRE, 22 W 
Monroe, Chicago. Ill 60603 For best choice of seats, list 
alternate dates 

22 W MONROE For Group Sain call 

CE 6 6?40 Blanch* CE 6 8250 



SHUBERT 



t- 



page 6 



f€ 



V 



H ARBINGER 
HkGhtMn 



January 28, 1973 



January 28. 1974 



T€ 



H>I?BINGER 



page 7 



(Cont from Page 1) 

after the first Board Meet- 
ing in February. At this 
meeting. I'm planning on 
being on the agenda and par- 
taking in discussion and 
bringing up a motion. " 

Altho his primary function 
is that of representing the 
students to the board, Mc- 
Glouthlin states that he is 



"Working jointly with other 
organizations to show inter- 
est in other matters. One 
is lockers in Building A. 
(another is) A list of jitney 
type shuttle bus system. " 
Along with this, he would 
like to see the college repay 
the additional expense to the 
students who drive this type 
of system. 



"If any students have any- 
thing they wish to express 
at the Board level, vmuld 
they please contact me per- 
sonally, or attend a Board 
Meeting on the 2nd or 4th 
Thursday of any given month. 

To contact Student Repre- 
sentative, call 537-0214, or 
527-0263. and he will get 
back to you. 



fatultY'Administration 



(Cont from Page 1) 

commends thai the board 
take five steps Require 
administrators to communi- 
cate with faculty comni I lie es 
before changing their re- 
conrunendations. insist that 
administrators who alter 
committee recommenda- 
tions "participate in some 
way in the philisophical dis- 
cussions that ledtothecom- 
mittee decision;" askallad- 
ministrators to teach one 
class a year; sel up a sys- 
tem, separate from the sys- 
tem for granting raises, to 
allow' faculty members to 
evaluate administrators, and 
provide faculty with a non- 
voting represenative to the 
board 

In view of the Faculty 
Senate's recommendations, 
the administration respon- 
ded with more questions, let- 
ters, and these state- 
ments. 

'The law does not say 
that the faculty should be 
given a direct vote Having 
a faculty member sitting on 



the board would be ruled out 
by a conflict of inlerest. ' 
said Dr Lahti. 

He went on further to say 
that everyoneshould have in- 
put in board discussion, but 
states that if the faculty was 
given a seat on the board, 
it would be no different than 
what t|)e faculty is doing 
now." 

The President sat back in 
his chair and jestered that 
"it would be more than just 
faculty who would want a seat 
on the board, everyone would 
soon want to be in the show, 
too." 

Upon hearing Lahti's 
statement. Senate President. 
Powell replied with. "I 
don't see how having a tea- 
cher on the board could be 
considered a conflict of in- 
terest. Like the student re- 
presenative he wouldn't 
have a vote. He would be 
there for exactly the same 
reason as the student - that 
Is to give the citizen board 
members another point of 
view. Board decisions will 




be better if the members 
examine differing points of 
view before reaching deci- 
sions. I don't believe that 
a board can function depen- 
ding almost entirely on one 
man's point of view." 

A second recommenda- 
tion by Powell, pleads for 
allowing Faculty to evaluate 
administrators But Vice 
President of Student Affairs. 
Guerin Fischer questions. 
"How could they (faculty) do 
it? " If the subject is stu- 
dent evaluation what is the 
relationship? " 

Fischer also added that he 
would not mind being re- 
quired to instruct a class at 
Harper "If the board would 
release me from some of 
our other duties." He said 
that nuiny Harper admini- 
strators teach duringthe ev- 
ening at other higher Insti- 
tutions 

In an effort to regain fa- 
culty communication stan- 
dards a workshop was held 
at the college duringsemes- 
ter break on January 22 and 
23 

In an address given to the 
faculty on January 10. Dr. 
Clarence Schaur. Vice Pres- 
ident of Academic Affairs 
announced the two day work- 
shop He expressed that "It 
seems important to my office 
that a short meetingof the to- 
tal faculty would be proper - 
hopefully, to pinpoint some 
possible misinderstandings 
about some overheard ru- 
mors, possible misleading 
statements, and some pro- 
bable personal feelings that 
might be floating about the 
campus. ' ' 

The topics selected by the 
administration were The 
Harper Student - Student 
Successes. Grading Prac- 
tices at Harper. Decision 
Making and Where are we in 
Evaluation'^' 

Although there has been 
talk of the faculty joining a 
union, both the administra- 
tion and the faculty are de- 
termined to resolve their 
differences ihroughotheral- 
ternatives such as the work- 
shop. 



L 



Remember back to Uie 
time when yuu were n kid 
on the block"' For those of 
you who do not know what 
a block is. (or perhaps you 
called it something differ 
ent) it is the group of kids 
who lived in your neighbor- 
hood. It Is the gang you 
were always with when you 
were eight or so 

You would sit around all 
school year long, und wait 
for summer, and when it 
came, it would pass by so 
fast that it never seemed 
three months long. hit rath 




er only a few short weeks. 

There was always some- 
thing going on You were 
active from the time you 
awakened in the nwrning 
until the time you went to 
sleep in the evening 

The mornings were filled 
with baseball 

"Who got the ball?" 

'1 do" 

"Did you wrap it? 

"Of course, what do you 
think I am? A dummy?" 

■ 'Shut up before I cut your 
nose off" 

"Aw gowan." 

Wrapping was mandatory 
You would "borrow " some 
tape from^omeone. and tape 
the bair up until it was 
twice it's original size, and 
three times it's original 
weight Why did you do if 
It wasan "indisputable fact' . 
that to play, the ball had to be 
taped. 

The afternoons were for 
swimming, walking around, 
sneaking a cigarette in the 
garage 

In 1967 lh« (kincral Assembly 
authorized a numtter of scholar- 
ships for students, who, after at- 
tending a Junior college, enroll in 
the Army ROTC af the stale- 
supported universities which of- 
fer this program (Northern Il- 
linois University, Weaiern Illin- 
ois University, University of Il- 
linois at Chicago Circle, and 
the University of Illinois at Ur- 
bana- Champaign). 
For further information, contact 
the Financial Aids OCHce. 



ABORTION 

NORTH SUBURBAN AND CHICAGO CLINIC 

FREE PREGNANCY TESTING 



Immediate Results 
Private Confedeniiol Assistance 
in Teiminotion ol Pregnoncy 
FAMIIY PlANNING 

American's Wbmcn Center 



ONE LOW 
COST 

Payments Arrongea 

(312)674-0902 or 534-6566 



K^^ 



I 



"Larry, are yousmoking 
again?" 

"Who me?" 

When you were caught. 
It meant that we would get 
"the cigar! This was 
when Pa would take you iti 
to the parlor, and insist that 
you join him in a .smoke 
Always it was a cigar 
My father at that time had 
the worst taste in cigars, 
and after two puffs I was 
on my way to "the rcmm 
Any kid on m> block, whos 
Pa gave htm Th«;Ciiiar' . 
and who cuinc uul later in 
the day. was considered u 
local hero 

flying 
airplanes, (both with power, 
and with anything else that 
could keep a model in the 
air), re-enacting Custer's 
last stand on the porch, 
plus anything else that came 
to mind. 

Another big part of the af- 
ternoon was walking around 
town doing the "Jab '. (Say- 
ing AHH and hitting your 
adams apple with your fin- 
gertips). You had to be auth- 
orized to do it. as Jimmy 
had exclusive right to it 
(after all. he Invented il)^ 
[X>lng the Jab without Jim- 
my's permission, meant a 
knuckled head 

Evenings. it was "Kick 
the Can." This game every- 
one played The game start- 
ed during the school year 
on the first night that the 
weather perrnitted. aixl 
lasted until the first cold 
night In fall During the 
school year, we would have 
to be In by eight o'clock, 
but during the summer, we 
would be allowed to slay 
out until ten or so. 

Reflecting on it all. I was 
never bored as a child 
It Is only in my adult life. 
When there are more things 
to do, that I have become 
bored 

Perhaps this islheanswer 
to boredom. Do away with 
all things to do. and re- 
place them with games, and 
the old "indisputable facLs 
that were all that mattered 
as children. 



Onktsfn Qwdithas 
shud 

Musicians with a desire 
to be sollsts at a Harper 
College Community Or- 
chestra Concert during the 
1974-75 season may obtain 
application forms and audi- 
tion rules now. 

Auditions will be held May 
22. 1974. 

Standard works for vo- 
calists and instrumentalists 
with orchestra must be used. 

Interested persons may 
contact Dr. George Makas, 
professor of Music, by mall 
at Harper College, Algonquin 
and Roselle Roads, Palatine, 
Illinois 60067; or by phone 
at 397-3000, extension 306. 



Two Gorls for the price of one ! 



9ort 

I liMrtHcuVs 
hadtoratton 
0a<o(in«. 



I Mish that 

rationed 
Fitting 
StatKXis! 




They lilce 

to call 'em 

'6crvice 

Stations' 

noM. 



IAMI,9or<<CAe« 
these damned 

petroleum 

cortalcmerate« 

have bwn erecting 

eue-s<x«s 

everywhere f 




rifst.oP coarse, 
they had fbuj) 
every comer on 
every biodcin 
every ^ 
oommuntty. 



SutnoM 

th^'re 
ctoairtg 'e«n 

down Cor 
th' ladt 
of gas* 




»rt 



tMhrtcha 

do«n', 

6ortt» 



I'm inventing 

a game. It 

caii« Cor deep 

conoentration, 

so ihot up! 



VJhat's Its reamed ' 

Chess. 

Mhaf s that? 

A pawn. 

vsHiat's that? 

A rook. 



What're those sqM2»-es? 

Th' chessboard. 
Mom doth' pieces move' 

Vanoue Mays. 
Uowdoy\Mn* 

Gtady'asked 
that 



That's what theg 
get tor cornering 
th' market on 
comersT 




..by destroying 
4»0ur opponent. 




NOtON COVIt UP 




14/EEK IN 

DISTORTION 

And now there's a toilet paper shortage . . . 

Amongst the gas pliers, meat freezei^ and gold dig- 
gers emerges the toUet paper fanatics. 

Large Increases in demand for toilet paper have 
been reported by area grocers. 

Although the shortage may seem real to local 
shoppers, there are reports from the East Coast that 
Indicate It may be one of those word-of-mouth nation- 
al hoaxes. 

Dialing for Dollars ... 

Yes, there is a Santa Claus. 

During the Christmas season about 5,000 children dial- 
ed long distance to the North Pole, Alaska. Con MUler, 
owner of the Santa Claus House Trading Post In North 
Pole, reports he's received many phone calls from 
youngsters In the 'lower 48" asking for presents. The 
kids, he said, may have gotten his number from long 
distance operators. 

Yes, parents, be prepared to get a surprise In your 

next phone bill. 

Barbers outlaws long hair . . . 

MANILA - The deputy police chief of Manila said po- 
licemen with hair considered to be too long would be sus- 
pended for 10 days and forfeit a half month's pay. The 
deputy chief is named James Barbers. 



There are 31 various musk artists within this word 
find. The answers will be printed in the next week's issue. 

FOLIE FINDS 



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£ 

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II 

I P 

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N A 

IC S 

D A 

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It T 

Q -. 

S N 

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M T 

J B 

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TLCLACTREHABt 
jrOELPROPPE ;d 
SIHTBHTEBT^RS 
0«lIKt:LO-»»CVOL 
LPOITOXSROODT 

LToaoa :jEvxi»s 

T.V3T0aiBSE0aT 
TOJIBVKREH'JRO 

r. 3: €Sf MoaTE.;cDii 

KC .OOOSTrXLOE 
HOlEOKKCSnCOF 
GHA!«Ofi;riK^ITZ 
ACTHTCrirAIIDEO 
^MVPBOOEDA'rSS 
KIDELASOKHTS', 

r)jiiooAii:?t:RLHM 

IT3^EJQCrOLPD 

HSODST.:.'ARTRB' 

TO.THTEJ.vSPJJR 



PERSONIllS 



Tom ... All forgiven, meet me 
at Park Point. I'll even watch the 
buses go by . . . JerL 
llaryin, pleaae come back . . . 
Keith. 

Steve, my little toldier boy . . . 
I'll be true to you. Pan. II. 
T.T. Yes. he got it on, what did 
you think? 

Blue Navy blue, I'm as blue as I 
can be- ROTC. 

How's the research after dark, 
you BANANA! 

Hey. there's a party in 907! 
Parllment will be right, right Tom? 
Wkat to my wonderln' eyes should 
apf>ear but something crawling 
through my window? 
Poker anyone ... or flying cards? 
Point Park or Park Point, I never 
could get that straight, but .you 
did. didn't you T.T. 
NItr nrrk Maryin! 
AND WHO coukl forget "Hna? 
Dancing in the moonlight . . . 
THE THIRD world Is watching 
Let's give a big hand to the na- 
ture walkers! 

Dennis, meet you at the pool 
table, Thursday at I, your treat! 
Joyca. 

Do«g. Keep your Ices croaaed, 
Luv Pat and Joyce. 
Ken we Juat want to be frtenda. 
Bruce the architect. I think you're 
say! 

Ter. see ya in Hawaii — Oompa! 
Lance, keep out of ttghl siluatlona, 
Briaa 

To the Photographers of Hw 
Harbinger staff The Mllor-ln- 
ehtif has determined thai Orbit 
bath is dangerous to your health. 
L.R.K. is only a trade name for 
ludicrous, rudiment and-KatKii- 
Januner. 

Puck coiieits 

(Cent, rrom Page 10| 

changes It seems very 
awkward and easy to get 
hurt The coach Is isolated 
at the end and can't walk 
behind his players to talk 
with them He has to lean 
over the boards and yell. 

I really can't say I like 
the Ice Before our game 
with Parkslde College it was 
very soft, slowing our pla- 
yers considerably. We con- 
ditioned ourselves for that 
game and It upset our game 
plan The attendants are 
making attempts to keep the 
ice in good shape, bit it 
still isn't consistantly good 
The edges along the boards 
sometimes are unev«i, ei- 
ther rise or dip and in the 
corners are gaps where the 
ice dosen't meet the boards. 
During games this impedes 
play since the puck gets lod- 
ged 

We have had an occasion 
in a game where t^e door 
popped open after a player 
was checked During prac- 
tices these doors are r»t 
properly secured either. 

The pro-shop isn't avail- 
able to us during the week 
and we can't have our loc- 
ker rooms secured during 
practices. The players car- 
ry their belongings to the 
bench with them. 

With the improvements of 
hockey at Harper we look for 
better conditions Hopefully 
the sports complex can ex- 
tract some of these criti- 
c Isms arxl supplement condi- 
tions of the arena 



^ ./ 



^v- 



^ 



\ 



{' 



January 28, 1974 



T€ 



H>1?BiNGER 



page 8 



Pool sharks announced 




i'am Varchvllo pu-iured above. 



The pool U'ut iiiiiii til IS 
over for anoth»r >fiir and 
the winners lor iht- nu-n s 
competition an* in'om(ian- 
non and :;) CraiK Filip 
For the girls wf have I) 
Pam Varchetlo an«J 2) Dawn 



Cough riit 
Milwauke<- 



their -Aav to 



national compt-iiiion. heo 
13. 14 and I.') u< pla> against 
finalists from Illinois. Wis- 
consin and Minnt-sota 



CONSIDER 

ROSARY 



MAX)R DEPARTMENTS 



DIVISIONAL MAX)RS 



Am«ncdK« StudiM 


Biologv Cr>emistry 




An 


Fin« Arts 


Biology 


Humanities 


CbemiMrv 


Modern Foreign Lar>gua<)es 


Communicalinn An\ and 


Social Science 


Sc*ncev 




f conomict *rxl 8uvine« 




t i.onom>c\ 


OTHER DEPARTMENTS 


BiiMOK^ AdmtniMraiton 




Arrountn>9 


Education 


r iiii.si' •'• 


f ull*TeachCr Certification 


kVt.tifi^ P'uqram 


CourvN in Special Edtica 


i "qli<rfi Education Program 


• •on Learning Divibilitiet 


t iier«iur» Program 


Geografihy and Geology 


P'f GrdM>u«tr PfO<|r<im 


Health and Phy v« al Education 


f M.-nch 


LirHjuistitv 


G«>fm«n 


Phywcs 


Hi\iorv 


Rr'ligioii'. '-'■..1.." 


•<"'!«• EccMWmici 


Ruwian 


' (HHlsanii Nnfrifion 




H(imr Ert.iwmics Education 


Pre Law 


' >• iiefdl Homp EcnrHMnics 


Pre Med 


tl(ll^lnq jnd Tcktilrs 




lUtian 


Foiii Yctr H A M A PfOfjum 


M<ith(?rrvHtc» 




Vuwf 




B<K:hv 

BdChHor ul Music 


ROSARY 




Brfchplor of MtiMC Educate 


[«r«!ir:fe!lJ 




P»lllO«T|l^v 




Polmr.il Stipnrc 


7900 W Division Street 


Psyrhotoqv 


River Forest. HI 60305 






SfMMivh ami Prirt. qiipv* 







Hosarv Coileqe offer^ a Jun«)r Year Abrr>*l in F.-bui 'q 
Switzerland a Semester in London and a Gr*li. -to :„ h,,,.! 
wt Fine Art% in Florence Italy Tt p Grndiuiti- S. i... i ,.t 
LitKary Sconce won the Rivn f.-.-st , ..mfniv 

toio i<vioNo«or>cM»v> KHOianviui iu««u M<>^. . ,.« 

F4o»«ry College 

Direttor of Admissions 

7900 W Division St. River Forest. Ill 60305 

Phofw (3121 Fo 9 6320 

Sr-tid iriforriiatioM »o 

i 

Uarne ■ 



A liliHss . 



r.'ls 



Sfdti- 



SCHAUMBURG FILES 

ORDINANCE FOR 

19 YR. OLDS 

Hey, Harper students, did 
you know that the village of 
Schaumburg is officially off 
limits for 19 and 20-year- 
olds who wish to purchase 
beer or wine where hard 
liquor is served^ The ordi- 
nance was lowered at the 
request of liquor license 
holders there. * 

If you are one of those se- 
lect few whohave just reach- 
ed the minimum age, your 
rights are being denied by 
Schaumburg When the state 
legislature granted 19 and 
20-year-olds drinking priv- 
ileges, it was also to be 
noticed withtheexistingcivil 
rights bill, which is to allow 
them to buy these beverages 
wherever they are sold. 

Although Schaumburg is a 
home rule community, those 
powers donot permit a muni- 
cipality to deny rights allow- 
ed by the state. 

So. when people start talk- 
ing about minority groups 
atvl if this article concerns 
you. you can consider your- 
self part of one. 

Recently, a couple other 
cities decided to take the bill 
of rights into their own hands 
such as Schaumburg is at- 
tempting to do Thosecities. 
Berwyn, Calumet City, and 
Joliet decided to go a step 
further; they completely 
ignored the new state law 
allowing 19-year-old8 to 
drink beer and wine Right 
now they have a ruit filed 
against them and are to ap- 
pear before the Legislature 
In court. 



Photo of the week 



January 28, 1974 



T€ 



H/1R6INGER 



page 9 



I „•.*»■■»/«:%%»•♦ I 






Photo by 



Square iJea 
^o\3is voditev 



By LARRY FREDRICK 

It's been found! And it's 
the truth, and it s been there 
all the time How did it go 
unnoticed all this while? For 
years I believed it too. Boy. 
it seems silly now to re- 
call my foolishness Millions 
have tried those diets which 
are "guaranteed to lose 18 
pounds and increase your 
bustline by 4 inches, over- 
night" combined with the 
testimonial from "Average 
Housewife. Anywhere. 

U. S. A. " But they never 
worked (except fortheAyds 
candy plan, where no one 
ever loses less than 87 
lbs and their binions dis- 
appear, miraculously), no 
matter how much water 
c ress and old shoes you eat. 
Some diets have you "Eat 
More to lose More Weight." 
others swear by "wearing 
4 sweatsuits under your 
street clothes will slim 



Say "I love you " 

with more love 

than money. 




ForiutlSM. inracl. 

Yes we have line quality 
diamonds for S 98 Andonuo 
lo»3 000 Youllfindlheminany 
0»>eolour stores And you ll 
aporeciate two rules every 
Hollands employee lives by 



First, we never high pressure. We 
preler that you shop slowly and 
carefully Look at only those 
diamondsihat you can afford We 
have a large selection m your price 
category AsKasmanyqueslionsas 
youliKe Well give you all the 
answers Straight 



Secortd. since 19IO«4«c policy of 
returning your money '1 'or any 

reason you re not satislipd 
So ifyou have the love anoaiitiie 
tMl of money we have the right 
diamond for you 



■ rv 

L. K. Kiel 



Hollands Jewelers 



I ). .v\ rll,,n ,1 1 



IT, 



Liki^hiirsl Wn.iilt,, 1(1 




you into serenity" But the 
baby fat still rolled off your 
chest The Diet of the Day 
is to lose it by water (Dr. 
Stillman's Water Diet. L 3 
quarts a day. Fat goes 
away). Sothetime came when 
one had to throw his weight 
around and find out why 
they don't work Just by ac- 
cident one evening, while 
tipping the bottle at some 
obscure roadhouse. I came 
upon the "Worlds Leading 
Authority" and he related to 
me a tale that would stifle 
the imagination It seems 
that the world has been un- 
der the iinpression that 
water has no calories, but 
that's only true in liquid 
form Ever wonder what 
that cloudy stuff is in ice'' 
Well, you are correct if you 
guessed that it was calories 
It has come to this report- 
er's attention, over 12 years 
ago. a former "heavy- 
weight" chanced upon this 
discovery while attending 
bar at the BABY HIPPIDINE 
CLUB (just this sideof Bend- 
over. Georgia) Private bus- 
inessmen, attempting to keep 
the public pudgy, quickly 
bought up the patent for a 
mere fraction of It's worth 
in weight Little known to 
the overweight of the world 
is the fact that every ice- 
cube is a potential killer. 
Not only does each cube 
contain 27 calories, but this 
menace has also been med- 
ically linked to baldness 
and of course hairy growth 
on tlie palms, Mvhich often 
leads to suicide That this 
threat to society has been 
allowed to exist is beyond 
all comprehension and 
strikes home worse than 
the Supreme Court ruling 
on Pornography. We, the 
knowledgeable American 
public can not let this out- 
rage to continue. I pro- 
pose stricter ice control 
legislation and the forming 
of a "Curb the Cube" cam- 
paign. If successful and en- 
acted quickly, we can for- 
get ice-cubes even faster 
than we did cycla mates It 
is your duty as a citizen 
to help pull the plug on 
the refrigerators of the 
world. 



\ 



Flight of Hawks cut short 



Warriors Clip Hawks Wings 

The Hawks wings were 
clipped in Thursday nights 
game against Triton. The 
Warriors of Triton defeated 
the Hawks 86-55. 

Schmitt was the only Hawk 
to score in double figures 
Jor the Hawks, ending the 
game with 16 points. ' 



5-0. Harper played a tough 
zone defense by defeating 
them, 66-59. 

The Hawks dominated the 
boards, rebounding 44, while 
the Chiefsof Waubonseehung 
under them with only 23 re- 
bounds. 

Controlling an early lead 
of 8-0, the Hawks kept the 




Brian Groth in acuun i gainst Elmkarst 



■AarBB <S(> TWTOM (Ml 

■ rr Tf ■ FT TF 

CreU 3 1-2 C T>n(T*41 . 7 (M> M 

Miellie 1 frl J rrntfley.t M » 

Prmbrnofi I 1-3 7 totem — S 04 10 

Sriiniitt . I M) M Alien . — ~S »« 10 

Mlimrr : 04> 4 Coney - 7 »« >« 

reMt 3 44 I OmU • e-t 

D»vta 9 1-1 t EMIemoa > »« 4 

N^ry f 1-a T Combt .. I M • 

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Harprr ._ 
Trllofi 



■nmBsraALTn 



«1 44 M 



.» 

44 40-« 



The Hawks need a win to 
get them off the ground. The 
odds were agianst them win- 
ning their next game against 
the Skyway champs of Wau- 
bonsee. 

Harper Suprises Waubonsse 

The Hawks were flying 
high in Saturday nights game 
against Waubonsee They 
surprised the Skyway Con- 
ference leaders by blemish- 
ing their flawless record of 



(dlasftififds 



Northern Illinois Unlver8it>' has 
established a scholarship pro- 
gram for outstanding junior col- 
lege students. These awards wull 
be known as UNIVERSITY 
SCHOLAR AWARDS. The com 
mittcc is interested in recruiting 
only outstanding junior college 
students for these awards. Con- 
tact Placement & Aids Office for 
further information. Room A364. 

Wanted roommate to live with 
two college students. From Jan. 
to June, rent is $60.00 a month. 
Contact Chuck Malancuk or Tom 
Ranba or leave name, address 
and phone no. at Harbinger of- 
fice. _ ..- 

Free room A l>oard plus $20 
salary to good natured female 
in exchange for child care and 
hse. work. Flexible. Time off for 
school or pt time Job. 255-5502. 



Chiefs from taking a shot 
the first three minutesof the 
game. 

The Chiefs endedthat ear- 
ly lead by scoring 10 straight 
points at 13:48 in the first 
half 

Both teams then exchanged 
six straight points apiece, 
and with 658 left in the half, 
the Chiefs dominated 16-14. 
But the Hawks caught up in 
the rest of the half, with 23 
up at intermission 

In the first half, the lead 
exchanged hands five times 
and the score stood still 
seven times 

"We set the tempo in the 
second half, and we could do 
this because we had the lead 
most of the second half," 
explained Coach Bechtold 
At second half the Hawks 
Were on edge at 43-v36 

At center were Hawks 
Dave Schmitt and Chuck 
Neary. Fourteen points by 
Neary and 12 points by 
Schmitt scored 26 of the 
Hawk's second half points. 

The outside shooting of 
Bob Hall, kept his Chleftans 
in the game during the lat- 
ter part of the competition 
Waubonsees starting for- 
ward gathered 15 tallies in 
the second half 

Finally the Hawks blocked 
Hall as his last Jimp came 
with 6:13 left in the game 



His last goal made the score 
51-47 in favor of the Hawks. 

Waubonsee suffered from 
fouls at the end of the game 
Ten of the Hawks' last 12 
points came from the free- 
throw line. 

"We played a good defen- 
sive game, we execute dwell, 
and we stuck to our patterns 
under pressure," expressed 
the contented Bechtold, now 
that the Hawk's conference 
record is even at 3-3. 

The over- all record is 
presently 9-9. 

With only 23 seconds to go, 
two successful free throws 
by Tom Marzec's assured 
the Hawks a victory bymak- 
ing the score 64-59. 

Schmitt led all scorers 
with 22 points followed by 
Hall who had 20 for the 
Chiefs. 

"A big improvement was 
shown Saturday night, and 
hopefully we can start win- 
n ing some games now, ' ' said 
Coach Bechtold. 



■Aarm i«i waqbonskb «t 

■ rr Tf ■ rr rr 

Mame - »a 4R»d«r. 3 13 T 
Grotb -J M S Ma«*.-I »4 4 
Pfmbersn I M 1 tUH .-.. . • 44 30 
SHiinlU . It 1-3 IS CrlMM 4 »! 14 

Milliwr 4 9-3 30 Baatow 1 »« 1 

H»Mt • M niioraa • »« 10 

n—n * ♦« >«' 



St h-ytm 



M 1440 M 
roulM Out — Hoaas, CrUsM 
•COBB BT BALI 

Wiubon—e ,.., » 

Harper -i , ,M 



Another Slow Start Hits 
Hawks 

With their victory over 
Waubonsee. the hopeful 
Hawks were ready to def.eat 
Elmhurst But the teams 
morale ended with their de- 
feat to Elmhurst by only 4 
points. 

"As usual we played a 
tough second half" said 
Coach Bechtold. seeing the 
Hawks overall conference 
r ecord of 9 - 1 1 

The Hawks seem to fall 
short due to their weak points 
during the first half. "First 
halves have been hurting us 
and I guess it's Just that we 
don't get ready to play. I 
don't really know." said 
Bechtold 

The score at half time 
found the Hawks down 36-25 
When three minutes were 
left to the game they had a 
three- point lead 

Elmhurst had more turn- 
overs than the Hawks. 18- 



Want to go overseas? 

WORK? • TRAVEL? • STUDY? 

GET THE ANSWERS' LEARN HOW! 
MEET: 

mort than 50 reprewntativst on intwnariortal programs 

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noted guest speakers on 

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17, but the Hawks out-re- 
bounded their opponents, 36- 
33 

The Hawks had more scor- 
ing opportunities, they at- 
tempted 75 shots and allowed 
Elnihurst only 59. 



SCORE BY HALVES 

Harper .. 28 3»-<l 

Ebnhurat JV 36 2»-es 

The Hawks will play May- 
fair Tuesday, January 29, 
here. Tip off time is 8 p.m. 




Coach Bechtold 



ANY STl'DKNT WHO PLANS lt> i'AK I IC ll'A I K IN M'KINtr 
TRACK SHOt'I.n BE SURK TO READ THE TRACK INKORMA 
TION WHICH IS K)STEI) IN THE ATHLETIC OFFICE F 345 
INFORMATION PRDVIDKI) DEALS WITH ELICIHILITY. I'RA( 
TICE TIMt-:&. AND INI>OOR;OtTI)OOR MEETS. PLEASE CON 
TACT BOB NOLAN F 34.'5 IF YOl' HAVE ANY (ilK.«TIONS 



LAST FEATURE EVERY NIGHT 12 MIDNIGHT 




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page 10 



K 



H/1RBINGER 



January 28, 1974 



Hawks undefeated after four Dinnc OC idkCX/ 

, the Hawk hockev team On rh^ .9 «r »v,,. t. »r*J^A '" ^"'°* Springs. . -■ m^ ■ 



Afte 
duled, and one pre -season 
match, the Hawk hockey team 
is undefeated. 

In action since our last 
issue, the Hawks defeated 
Morton College by a score of 
8-2. in a game played at 
the Rolling Meadows Sports 
Complex. 

In this game, the Hawks 
displayed some good hockey 
action, with some good hard 
hitting, andingeneralputona 



came to watch 

On the 12 of this month 
the Hawks took on the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, Park- 
side, and defeated them by 
a scoreof 6 Thegamewas 
played at Rolling Meadows 
facility again, and for once, 
none of the doors flew open, 
and the puck stayed on the 
surface of the ice 

Following a three day rest, 
the Hawks were on the road. 




ConDelly takes a shot at goal. 



Chalet 
Illinois 

While they were once a- 
gain playing Morton College, 
they lacked something, and 
their usual smooth handling 
of the puck, good play deve- 
lopment, and hard hitting 
ability came off with less 
ease. 

For the first two periods, 
the Hawks had trouble mak- 
ing contact with the oppon- 
ents nets, scoring only one 
goal in the first and second 
period combined. 

Their ability tocontrolthe 
puck was something less than 
exciting There appearedto 
be more emphasis on indi- 
vidual playing, rather than 
team effort 

This perhaps was the re- 
sult of over confidence, in 
that they had easily defeated 
the same opponents before. 
The next Hawk home game 
is against DuPage. and 
should be an interesting 
game if the Hawks play like 
they did against Morton The 
game starts at 4 p m and is 
played at the Rolling 
Meadows Sports Complex 
3900 Owl Drive, Roll- 
ing Meadows. 



MM/-seo5ea Harper basketball team appraised 



By DON FRISKE 

A mid- season look at the 
winter athleUc program at 
Harper College in Palatine 
shows the wrestling team 
with a dual -meet record of 
6-1 and the basketball squad 
with a mark of 9 9 

The following is a recap 
of the first half of the win- 
ter season and a look into 
the remaining schedule 

WRESTLING 

Even though the Harper 
wrestling team had a 6-1 
record after seven dual 
meets, coach Ron Bessemer 
wasn't satisfied 

We haven t really been 
wrestling up to our poten- 
tial." Bessemer explained 
"Our progress has been 
slow, but it should be just a 
matter of time before we 
start coming around." 

Joliet was the only team to 
beat the Hawks It was 
their second dual meet of 
the season and they went 
down, 36-9 

Oatoon and Triton have 



been the Hawks' only Skyway 
Conference opponents thus 
far They defeated Oakton 
52- 4 and Triton 33 9 

As far as winning is con- 
cerned, the Hawks have had 
many standouts Key per- 
formers for Harper have 
been Bernie Kleimanat 118 
(Deerfield). Al Gordon at 126 
(Conant). Steve Bollinger at 
142 (Svcamore).and Steve 
Frankovic at 177 (Arling 
ton). 

Tom DalCompo (Arling- 
ton) has looked good at 134. 
being pressured by team- 
mates Mike Mallay( Wheel- 
ing) and Gary Thacker(Pon- 
tiac) for his position Ken 
Trommer (Irving Crown) has 
shown progress at 1 58 and 
Ron Vyiasek (Elk Grove) and 
Hohn Silver (Bloomington) 
have been splitting at the 
190 level 

"We've got the tough part 
of our schedule ahead of 
us." Bessemer said Well 
be competing against some 
nationally -ranked teams 

BASKETBALL 

With a 9-9 over-all re- 



202 S. Cook SL 




Barrington 



cord after 18 games, the 
Harper basketball team had 
their season s highlight and 
low spot within a two -week 
span 

The Hawks captured se- 
cond place in the Highland 
Classic Tournament over the 
Christmas holidays losing 
only to Lakeland, the even- 
tual tourney winner 

Right after their impres- 
sive tourney showing, the 
dropped two games by big 
scores to the College of Du- 
Page and Triton 

'Those two losses were 
our biggest disappointment 
so far. " coach Roger Bech 
told said 

The the Hawks came back 
to beat Waubonsee. the Sky 
way Conference leaders, by 
a score of 66-.59toeventheir 
Skway record at 3-3 

Bechtold sees the remain 
der of the season with op- 
timism "I feel we can play 
with anybody if we go into 
the game ready " Bechtold 
said 

The Hawk coach sees Tri- 
ton vi.s the team to beat for 
the SKywayt rown Harper 
plays irvnv ri:4ain. this time 
at home on Friday. Fe- 
bruary 8 



The season has started for the Harper Hockey Club 
and they are doing rather well in brir^ing fame to the 
college as a team that is to be respected, if not feared 
Their conquests include Loyola, and the University of 
Wisconsin, Parkside. 

They have been undefeated in their four outings at the 
Ume of thls.writing. 

What does the team receive for their efforts? Contin- 
ued non-recognition from the school. 

Hockey in this area is an estabUshed sport Many 
of the towns and vlUages in this region have one rink 

fTnii^^M^T", \" '"^^y " ^** ^"'^^o'- year round 
facUitle.. Most of these are commercially run facUities 
that are declaring a profit. Rental time for these rinks be- 
gm early in the morning, and continue until after mid- 
night in some cases. 

Most towns possess some type of team, or park district 
league that participates in an organlz e<1 hockey. 

Seeing this future of hockey in the area, and the fact 
Uiat most colleges possess some type of organized 

J'f^^.J'f^'^"'' °' '^"'*' "^^ ""^^ ^^ administration. 
and athleUc department of this school to continue the 
spread of this sport, and to help it grow with the establlsh- 

Z.m ati rig^ht^ ""^^ " • ^"'*^ ">-•• -'^ '"" 

We urge the athletic department to provide the players 

with a respectable place to play this sport. At this Ume. 

m/-H « ^^ ^iV* '• ^"""^ •« PJ«y «» the RolllnK 

Meadows Sports Complex. It is one of the worst faculties 
in the area. The ice is in atrocious condition. There 
are places along the boards where the puck wUl disap- 
pear from sight, and stdp dead. There are places where 
the ice is extremely slow along the boards, slowing the 
game, and causing dissatisfaction among those of us 

to iu Ski^t *'*'^*'*"* ""' '^'' **' ^"^^^y ****"« p'^y^* 

Who pays for this club? Part of the bill is paid for by 
the Athletic Department, and part is paid for by the 
players. ' 

Due to the fact that the hockey team is part of the 
Hockey Club, there are connicts that arise in practice 
. sessions when the coach is unable to devote full Ume 
n the procurement of a team, but rather has lo take 
time in coaching those individuals who arc not mem- 
ber, of the team, who who have paid their fee. and 
are members of the club. 

We wUh to commend Oie team for Ihqr spirit, and 
abiUty to provide good hard hockey, and their drive 
in pursuit of the sport of hockey. We also wish to com- 
mend the Hawk coach. Robert Downing for hi., ability 
to [uncUon both as a coach, and as a student. His lead- 
ership has undoubttedly helped Uie team, in that he 
fn !!L°*'"u*^1''"' *"*^ * "e^'^'' •'"* '^o*'" «««tude which 

.K ..?^*J^*"'*'P*' •*"***"' ^"^y »he caliber of team 
that they deserve. 

U only the adminlstraUon wUl follow the lead of 
these individuals, and reward their efforts by establishing 
the Hockey Team as a Varsity sport. 

If only the student body wUI show some interest in 
the team, and help in the cause by attendance at the 



^McA cemntenLx 



By DENNIS SOBOJ 



DARKENS 



FOR 



Full Stock Adidas Shoes track tennis casual 



Bechtold feels that thekpy 
to his club is his center. 
Dave Schmitt (Conant). "Ori 
anygiven night. Dave can 
rate as the best big man in 
Illinois. " Bechtold added 

Steve Heldt (Hersey)and 
Mike Millner (Elk Grove) 
have also been contrlbiting 
well in the scoring column 
for the Hawks. 



I was asked by this news 
paper to make some com 
ments about the Rolling Mea 
dows Sports Complex, the 
arean where we play out 
home games and have out 
practices The team spends 
an average (rf three to four 
days a week there 

The arena has undergone 
some changes already with 
the increased amountof hoc- 
key Things like positioning 
the score board which was 
centered directly above the 
player's benches where they 
were unable to see it. and 



hanging lights which when 
unaided by sunlight were 
poor and frequently getting 
hit by flying pucks 

These two examples are 
just minor Indications of im- 
proper design The benches 
are built above the surface 
area of the boards with no 
more than three feet distance 
from the wall When a pla - 
yer eitters or leaves the 
game It takes more effort 
than just hopping over. Plus 
the beams and cross wires 
limit the seating capacity. 
Players can t walk down to 
get ready for the next line 

(TurnloPagr 7) 



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H/IRBINGER 

William Rainey Harper College, Algonquin and Roselle Roads. Palatine, Illinois 60067. 312-397-3000 



Vol. 7, No. 16 



February 13, 1974 



Ray Blakeman named 
to Harper Board 



The new seventh member 
of the Harper College Board 
of Trustees is Ray Blake- 
man, 1107 South Mercury 
Drive, Schaumburg 

Blakeman was named by 
the college's trustees to fill 
the vacancy created in the 
resignation in January of 
Analee Fjellberg of Hoffman 
Estates Miss Fjellberg 
cited family obligations in 
her resignation, which was 
officially accepted by the 
board on January 22. 

Mr Blakeman. 50. will 
serve in the Harper board 
position until April at which 
time he will need to enter 
the regular spring election 
for the two years remaining 
in the term. 



The appointment of Blake- 
man was approved unani- 
mously by the four board 
members. The new student 
representative was also 
present Twelve other candi- 
dates had applied for the 
position and were interview- 
ed that night also. 

Blakeman is president of 
Spotnails. Inc.. of Rolling 
Meadows, makers of power 
tools and fasteners for the 
construction industry Prior 
to assuming that position in 
1969. he was associated with 
Illinois Tool Works for 21 
years in the Chicago area 

Blakeman is a graduate of 
Springfield Junior College. 
Springfield. Illinois, and at- 
tended Lincoln LawSchoolin 



Springfield and the Advanced 
Management Institute at 
Harvard University. 

A native of Pleasant 
Plains. Illinois, he served 
in the US Air Force dur- 
ing World War II and left 
with the rank of lieutenant. 

In civic involvements he is 
a director of the Rolling 
Meadows Chamber of Com- 
merce, a charter member of 
the Rolling Meadows Rotary 
Club, and a director of 
Swingline, Inc., parent com- 
pany of Spotnails. Inc 

He is also director of the 
Harper College Education- 
al Foundation, which was or- 
ganized last fall The foun- 
dation is a nonprofit group 
set up to solicit funds for 



Senators to be 
appointed by Senate 



By DIANE DiBARTOLOMEO 

Petitions are now avail- 
able to candidtfes to fill two 
open seats in the Student 
Senate The term of office 
for these Senate positions 
ends at the completion of 
Spring .Semester 1974 Com- 
pleted petitions filed by Wed- 



nesday. February 13. will 
enable them to go before the 
Senate for inti^rview and ap- 
pointment 

Elections are the usual 
procedure for selecting 
Senators to represent the 
student body But Student 
Senate President Robert 
Hayhurst explains the reason 



/ 




Dae to lack of 
voter turnout at 
the polls. Student 
Senate Prcs., Ro- 
bert Hayhurst 
has selected to 
appoint the new 
Senators. 



for appointment by the Sen- 
ate as opposed to an elec- 
tion of the student body. "In 
the past semester and a half 
the entirecompliment of Stu- 
dent Activities has been 
working onelections. includ- 
ing the HARBINGER and 
WHCM Everyone has done 
a magnificent job. We're 
tired of having a small mi- 
nority expressing opinion 
The work put in is not worth 
doing for the election sys- 
tem. " said Hayhurst 

Hayhurst is requiring all 
Senators to put in ten hours 
a week which would cover 
Senate meetingsthatareheld 
every other TThursday. and 
participate in the Operation 
Reach Out Program He is 
also requiring Senators to 
serve on committees. 

One -hundred Harper stu- 
dent signatures are needed 
to fill a petition. Petitions 
are available in the Student 
Activities office. A 336 and 
must be returned by Febru- 
ary 13. Interviews will be 
Thursday. February 14. at 
12 30p m.. A 242a 

The two Senators whose 
positions are to be filledare 
Stacey Bueschell who re- 
signed and Doug Janis who 
was dismissed. 





The api>uiii;;iit.nt of Eay Blakeman wa« a|>|>i.>%txj l>> the board 
to fill the vacancy of Analee Fjellberg who resigned. 



Harper. 

Recetttly. in his favorite 
pastime. Blakeman won the 
national championship in the 
sprint cardivisionoftheU S 
Auto Club inHouston.Texaii. 



Owner of two racing cars, 
he called the championship 
the "Tiffany of ailo racing" 
and wears a lapel emblem 
in the shape of the numeral 
1. 



Gas shortage affects 
Harper enrollment 



By LARRY FREDRICK 

The statistics on spring 
enrollment at Harper are In 
and the picture is fairly en- 
couraging as seen by Dr. 
Guerin Fischer. Vice Presi- 
dent of Student Affairs 

The number of full-time 
students this semester is ap- 
proximately the same as that 
of last semester, bil ihey 
just may be in other areas 
The number of students en- 
rolled in career programs 
has declined, whereas the 
number of students aiming 
toward a transfer program 
has increased 

The total amount of stu- 
dents enrolled in credit 
classes, both full-time and 
part-time is 8.550. showing 
a definite decrease over last 
semester.. There are also 
about 3.060 people register- 
ed in the Continuing Educa- 
tion Program 

Though Harper's enroll- 
ment is down there seems to 
be somewhat of an explana- 
tion, as seen by Dr Fisch- 
er, and it seems to be the 
energy crisis or gas short- 
age Dr. Fischer's officehas 
conducted an informal tele- 



phone survey and results 
seem to indicate that stu- 
dents are reluctant to enroll 
at Harper and further their 
education by taking one or 
two classes because they feel 
that the gas shortage may 
hinder their attempts at get- 
ting here 

Harper's enrollment de- 
crease is only slight in com- 
parison to those received 
from both Oalaon Commun- 
ity College and Triton Com- 
munity College, but at this 
time we are not aware of why 
their enrollments have de- 
clined so sharply. 

It should be noted here 
that even though enrollment 
decreased, we still have 
more people enrolled now 
than we did last year at this 
time Due to Harper being 
in a quick-growth area, our 
administrators had estimat- 
ed that Harper's growth 
would increase accordingly 
to that of the surrounding 
communities, which did not 
deem to be the case. 

The average age of the 
students attending Harper 
stayed the same, and it is 27. 
The ratioofmalesto females 
is almost equal with the 
males havingthe slight edge. 



( 



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page 2 



T€ 



H>1^NGER 



February 13, 1974 



Algonquin Road in limbo 



Although Algenqidn Road 
construction is inlimbodur- 
ing the winter months, con- 
tractors recently openedtwo 
additional lanes from the 
Harper College entrance to 
Roselle Road so that traffic 
flow might be eased with 
added safety. 

During the Algonquin Road 
widening project, Harper and 
other motorists have been 
slowed by two -lane traffic 
and (especially in non-day- 
light hours) confused by bar- 
ricades in that area 

The inner lane for drivers 
coming from the west has 
been designated asa left turn 
only lane to provide ingress 
to the college campus. 

A project engineer for the 
State of Illinois stressed that 
eastbound drivers expecting 
to enter Harper campus, who 
have mistakenly taken the 



outer lane, should continue 
forward, turn around where 
possible and return, rather 



than cause traffic problems 
by attempting to turn left 
from the other lane. 




Lcat motorMs believe that the road wklening project on Algonqnin 
from BomUc load to Route 53 is Interminable. 



Lest motorists believe that 
the road widening project on 
Algonquin from Roselle Road 
to Route 53 is interminable, 
here are the facts. 

The project began August 
10. 1972. Work has been in 
progress for exactly 163 
"working days." with 77 
more to go tor the 240 work- 
ing days in the contract. 

The construction term 
"working days" does notin- 
clude weekends, holidays and 
times when weather doesnot 
permit proper working con- 
ditions. 

The state resident engi- 
neer estimates that 75 per- 
cent of the project is finish- 
ed. He predicts that when 
the weather breaks, pave- 
ment for the full four lanes 
should be completed within 
two to three months 



There's not much immed- 
iate help for the stretch of 
Algonquin Road a few yards 
east of Harper's entrance, 
where motorists have be- 
come adept at synchroniz- 
ing their driving skills to 
avoid largechuck holes while 
dodging approaching traffic 
and guiding their vehicles 
around a sharp curve on a 
grade at the same time 

"We've calledthe contrac- 
tor to fill those chuck holes 
at least 20 times this win- 
ter." said theengineer, "but 
all we can use in this weath - 
er is cold asphalt Whenwa- 
ter gets in it, the patch 
pops out again. We have 
suffered through this, too 
If we had only had good 
weather a little longer last 
fall, we could have finished 
that section " 



^^. 



t"^>ft 



i^ 



\^ 1201 N. Elmhur«t 



Student money crunch is topic of lobby 



Prospect Hta. 



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with HARPER I.D 




"Presently. 175.000 col- 
lege students face the ter- 
mination d their education 
if today's trends continue" 
This startling statement was 
made by Arthur Rodbell. 
Executive Director of the 
National Student Lobby, as he 
sees the plight of the student 
under the present gasoline 
pricing and distribution sys- 
tem 

The lobby will be focusing 
on the STUDENT MONEY 
CRUNCH and has attracted 
a formidable group of Con- 
gresspersons. government 
officials and educators, in 
addition to the scheduled 
gathering of nearly HOO stu- 
dent leaders from the 40 
states 

On February 23 through 
February 27 two members 
of the Student Senate at Har- 
per will be attending the 
Third Annual Lobby Confer- 
ence Robert Ha yhtirst. Stu 
dent Senate President and 
Senator Stan Sapieha. will 
present an in depth report 
to the Senate upon their re- 
turn from Washington DC 

The lobby will give stu- 
dents the opportunity to ob- 
tain new resources and ex- 
perience through these gov- 
ernment leaders and will 
also give them a chance to 
o'fer their talents as well 

Through workshops and 
panel discussions, students 
will be examining the issues 
confronting the student com 
m unity today, such as the 
effects of the EnergyCrisis 

Rodbell claims. "Every 
dollar increase for a tank of 



gasoline represents a dol 
lar increase intuitionforthe 
five andone-half million(es- 
timated) who must commute 
to 2 and 4 -year colleges and 
universities. Rodbell asked 
that the administration dis- 
cuss with the Lobby what 
effects gasoline rationing 
might have on students, as 
he sees it as an inevitable 
consequence of the crisis. 
He questioned. "Will ration- 
ing guarantee control over 
price of gasoline, which is 
currently being consunedon 
a first-come first -serve ba- 
sis in a sellers markef " 
The President's National 
Commission on Financing 
Post - Secondary Education 
reported on December 31. 
1973. that every $100 in- 



crease in tuition forces at 
least two and one -half 
percent or 175.000 students 
out of public colleges. The 
increase in cost for the aver- 
age commuter vA\o travels 
ten miles to school and pays 
a 20^ increase inthepriceof 
gasoline equals a $100 in- 
crease in tuition. 

"If you're going to allow 
these increases to continue 
under the present system, 
based on uncontrolled con- 
sumption, then you might as 
well raise tuition for mil- 
lions of commuting students 
who have no alternative to 
driving," Rodbell said 

Rodbell also urged that 
students be treated equally 
with workers "Every dollar 
increase in commutingcosts 



hits the working student 
three times harder than the 
full - time worker." stated 
Rodbell "After all. students 
earn, on the average, one- 
third of what full time work- 
ers do" 

"The energy crises also 
affects students in many 
ways that lie above and bey- 
ond the gasoline shortage: 
closing of schools for the 
winter, pre-empted school 
employment, increase in the 
cost of books, increasedtul- 
tion threats due to campus 
administrations energy cut- 
backs -- which means, in 
some cases, a 45 per cent 
increase in needed funds, 
threatened commuter taxes 

(Tarn to Page 3) 



Reg/sfrofiM stitt occepferf for covrses 



The opening of several 
Harper College continuing 
education courses for lh»- 
spring senH'.ster has Ixmti 
delayed to permit addition 
al enrollment Registrations 
for the followingcourses will 
be accepted until thr nit'ln i 
the class itself 

Opening Monday. February 
1 1 are 

-Fundamentals of D a t ii 
Processing, through March 
18. Mondays. 8-10 p m . 
room D1I7. tuition $\A f<»r 
in district residents. S.u 72 
for out of district residents 

- • Life Insurance Law and 
Company Operations CI l' 



ABORTION 

NORTH SUBURBAN AND CHICAGO CLINIC 

FREE PRE6NANCY TESTING 



Immediole Results 
Pfivofe Contedeniiol Assistonce 
in Tetminalion of Pregnancy 
FAMllV PLANNING 



Ameriton'j Wbmen Center 



ONE LOW 
COST 

Poymenfj Arrongeo 

(312) 674-0902 or 534-6566 



II. through April I Momlaw 
6-8 p m . F.'<26 tuition si i 
in-district $67 44 out oi 
district 

Pension FManniOK C L(i 
IV through April 1. Mun 
days, H 1(1 p m . F.H2b. tui 
tion $14 in-district $(j7 14 
out -of district 

.luck) I. through April I 
Mondays. 8-10 pm . Bar 
rington High School wrest 
ling gym tuition $16. plus a 
one dollar fee. 

Opening Tuesday. Febru 
ary 12 are 

- ■ Ground Aviation, 
through March 21. Tuesdays 
and Thursdays, 7-10 pm . 
F307, tuition $42 in-distrlct 
$101 16 out -of -district 
-Machine, Shop, through 
June 4. Tuesdays. 7-9 pm . 
B139, Tuition $28 in-district 
$67 44 out -of -district 

Opening Wednesday. 
February 13 are 

-Woodshop (introductory 
woodworking), through June 
5. Wednesdays. 7-9 pm . 
Barrington High School 
room 138. tuition $28 in- 



district-$67 i4 out of d is 
trict 

Drawing and Sketching 
through April 3. Wednesdays 
7 10 pm . Cooper Jr High 
School, room 213. tuition 
$21 in district $50 58 out 
of -district 

Opening Thursday. Febru- 
ary 14 are 

-Computer Operator, 
through April 4. Thursday 
8-lOp.m , F326. Tuition $28 
In-distrlct $67 44 out of 
district 

- -Conversational German, 
through March 21, Thurs- 
days, 6-8 pm . F326. tui- 
tion $14 in-district $33 72 
out -of -district 

-Conversational Portu- 
guese, through May 11. Sat- 
urdays. 10-12 noon. DI16. 
tuition $14 in-district 
$33 72 out -of -district 

Opening Monday. Febru- 



ary 18 is: 

- -Scuba 

April 29. 

10:30 p.Ti 



Diving, througl^ 
Mondays, 7 30 
St Viator High 
School pool, tuition .S48.plus 
a fee of $12. 






February 13, 1974 



H 



H/1RBINGER 



Free seminars offered 



The Student Senate Legal 
Services Committee will be 
conducting a series of semi- 
nars dealing with important 
legal topics 

These seminars will cov- 
er topics that are of im- 
mediate consequence to ev- 
eryone Some of the subjects 
that will be covered are 
Legal Rights and Privileges, 
Contract Law. Tax Prepar- 
ation, Insurance, and Credit 
Procedures. These semi- 
nars will be open to stu- 
dents, faculty, and staff of 
Harper College, at no cost. 
The Legal Rights and 
Privileges seminar will cov- 
er civil rights, arrest proce- 
dures available to the police, 
the limits placed on these 
procedures, and limitations 
on warrants 

To be discussed at the 
same time will be the right 
to freedom of speech and 
assembly, and the fifth a 



mendment, which covers self 
incrimination. 

The TaxPreperationSem- 
inar will cover tax form 
preparation, legal deduc- 
tions, and exemptions, 
penalties for falsification of 
returns, failure to comply 
with the Federal and State 
tax laws, what an audit con- 
sists of. and Ux refunds, to 
name a few. 

The contract seminar will 
cover leases, deeds, con- 
tracts, and what they mean 
Also to be covered are lia- 
biUUes 

During the Credit and 
Financing Seminar, some of 
the topics that will be dis- 
cussed are. types of credit, 
maintaining a good credit 
rating, how to increase your 
rating, and problems involv- 
ed in financing. 

Another topic to be dis- 
cussed at a later seminar 



will be insurance This ses- 
s ion will expla in what to look 
for when you are taking out a 
policy, different types of in- 
surance, automobile, and 
motorcycle insurance, and 
how to get lower rates Also 
it will cover the different 
types of life and health in- 
surance policies that are 
available at this time. 

The first of these semi- 
nars will be on income tax 
There will be two separate 
sessions, tentatively to be 
held on Tuesday. February 
26. 12 30. in E106. and Wed- 
nesday. February 27, at 2 
p.m.. also in E106 

The course will be given 
by a representative of the 
Internal Revenue Service, 
and all mate rials needed will 
be provided 

TTje procedures for regis • 
tration will be announced at 
a later date 



Lecture here on 



44 



Who killed J.F.K" 



A k'ciuri- .in the assas 
slnation of IMt-sidrnt lohn I' 
Kennedy will Ik- present«>dat 
Harper Collegt- IVb 13 a( 
12 irt |) m The public is In 
vlted to attend the program, 
entitled Who Killed JFK 
which will be held in Room 
A-242 Admission is free 

Evidt-mv from photo- 
graphs and films will be 
presented to support the as 
sumption that President 
Kennedy was klllVd ihrouKh 
a conspiracy The lecturr 
will be presented by H«»»> 
Kalz During the program 
hundreds of slides, incltid 
ing the Zapruder film will 
be shown, with a descrip 
tion of evenLs on Nov jj. 
1963. the da> JFK was kill 
ed as his motorcadf woiirol 
its way through downtown 
Dallas Katz presents links 
between figures invoKed m 
the assassination and thi> 
men arrested for the Water 
gate break- in He questiot; 
the reasons the C.I A fil- 
on Osvsald arebeingwi(hh< i. 
from the public till ih« \< .c 
20,39 A question ana aaswtf 
period will follow the pro 
gram 

Katz. with the coopera 



tion of the Committee to In 
vesligate Assassinatioas 
has^-t5?en lecturing on th«' 
Jonn F Kennedy assassin- 
jmon since the fall of 1972 
^ior to that. Katz worked 
as a journalist He has also 
produced radio shows on ih^ 



assassination for WBUR and 
WBCN in Boston 

The program is sponsored 
by the Harper College Pro- 
gram Board and Cultural 
Arts Committee and financ- 
ed by student activity fees. 



page 3 




Mnce the fall of 1972 Bob Katz 
•aaaination of John F. Kennedy. 
February 15. 



haa been lecturlig on (he as- 
He will speak at Harper oa 



(ConL from Page 2) 

by the EPA , and other events 
"Students do understand 
their role in energy conser- 
vation, bil must object when 
their jobs or educations are 
unduly threatened by over- 
sight on the part of the en- 
ergy policy makers." stated 
Rodbell. 

Rodbell, and other mem- 
bers of the NSL staff, will 



Slwdnt hbhy 

meet with Simons aides in 
an effort to establish a spec- 
ial comm'.itee to deal with 
the prol-.iems of commuting 
Students Rodbell stated that, 
"the National Student Lobby 
will continue to press the 
Federal Energy Office until 
a sit-down meeting with Si- 
mon takes place This is the 
only way the needs of the 
commuting student can be 
acted upon." 



RESEARCH 



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GILENQ^ 
OFEl/TMS 

Mini-Courses^- 
Feb. 12 & 14, 12 noon-l:50 p.m., A-242A, "Cross 
Country Skiing." an introduction to the techniques 
and equipment used. 

Feb. 12 & 'U, 7:30-9:30 p.m., A-242B. "Charting of 
the Stock Market." discussion of how to make charts 
and an objective look at the current research, both 
pro and con, being done in technical analysis. 

Feb. 26 & 28. 12:00 noon-l:50 p.m., A-242A, "Jug- 
gling," learn to juggle, be the life of parties. Course 
covers basics, demonstrations and ideas for your own 
tricks. Each participant must bring three balls. Regis- 
ter for all mini-courses in Student Activities Office. 
A-336. 
On Campus^ ^ ^ , 

Lecture, "V\'ho KlUed JFK." by Bob Katz. Feb. 13, 
12:15 p.m., A-242. 

BB, away. Harper vs. Waubonsee. Feb. 12, 7:30 p.m. 

Student Senate Mtg., 12:30 p.m., Feb. 14, A-242 A. 

All Night FUm Orgy, p-eb. 15. 10p.m.-6 a.m.. Lounge. 

Hockey, home game. Harper vs. Triton, Feb. 16. 
4:30 p.m.. R,M.S.C. 

BB. Harper vs. Oakton, here. Feb. 16. 7:30 p.m. 

Photography Fjthiblt, Feb. 18-Mar. 17. First Floor. 
P Bldg. 

"Versus." on campus television, channel 6. Feb. 19 & 
20. Program focuses on human conflicts which may 
have been prevented by collective defense. 

Melvin Stecher and Norman Horowitz, dub pianisu, 
to present concert, Feb. 28. 8 p.m., college center. 
Harper students and staff free with I.D. Public ad- 
mission: $1.50 for adults, 75c. students. 
Theatre— 

"Dance on a Country Grave," at the Arlington Park 
Theatre, extended thru Feb. 17. Coming to ArUngton 
Park The. "The Odd Couple," with Art Carney & 
Don Knotts, Feb. 21 -Mar. 3, and "One Flew Over 
the Cuckoo's Nest." with James Farentino. Mar 7- 
AprU 7. Ph. 392-6800. 
Musk- 

The Four Seasons, Feb. 16. Arie Crown. 

Vladimir Ashkenazy, world famous pianist, at Orches- 
tra Hall, Feb. 17, 3 p.m. Andres Segovia, world's 
greatest guitarist, Feb. 17. 7 p.m., Orchestra Hall. 

Burt Bacharach. Feb. 22-24, Arie Crown. 

Stephen StiUs, Mar. 8. Auditorium The. 

Joel Gray, Auditorium The.. Mar. 12. 

The Lettermen, Arte Crown, Mar. 1 5. 





\ 



I ■/ 



^ 



page 4 



«H/«BINGER 



February 13, 1974 



OUTPU 




Administration tries to hit two birds with one stone 

Faculty evaluation still up in air 



An "unhappy document" was the phrase used by 
Harper's President Dr. LahU to describe the status of the 
Faculty EvaiuaUon system at the time it was accepted 
by the board and the faculty. Although both parties were 
not completely satisfied, the new document was to be tried 
for a period of one school year. 

The faculty committee left that day in March un- 
happy .but knowledgeable of what was to be contained 
in the final document. To their surprise six months later 
the faculty was furious to find that an insertion of a 
paragraph was added to the document. 

The insertion indicated that the faculty evaluation 
resulte, including student evaluaUon of faculty, would be„ 
used direcUy in reaching decisions "for tenure, promo- 
tion, sabbaticals, retention, non-retention, or other mat- 
ters outlined in the policy. 

When the initiation of this new quest was incorporated 
into the already trial document, it created further com- 
plications. The faculty's attention was not called to this 
matter before it was changed and approved on May 10. 
The overlook on the part of the administration created 
hostility between them and the faculty. More alarming 
is Uie fact Uiat Uie trial document which had loopholes 
at the beginning, acquired another one. 

It seems as though the administration is trying to 
accomplish too many tilings in too narrow a span. They 
did tills witiiout tiie consideration of others whose opinion 
should be valued and considered. Witiiout the second 
viewpoint from outside experienced sources, tiie adminis- 
tration will lose aU open mindedness. 

Evaluating last weeks editorial on tiie administration 
looking for a second site and overlooking tiie problems 
Harper already has. and relating It to tiielr action tiiey 
took on tiie faculty evaluation document, it seems as 
tiiough tiie administration U attempting too much at one 
time. By trying to do this, tiiey are failing to solve our 
present needs, in the quality of work and time devoted 
to meet them. 

We do understand tiiat the reason behind tiie admlnls- 
ti-ation looking into a second site was because of tiie 
poUcy requirements stated in the Higher Board. The 
Higher Board requires tiiat all junior coUeges begin to 
look for a second site when their enroUment reaches a 
certain figure of whkh Harper qualified. Therefore, tiie 
least the adminlsti^ation can do under tiiese circumstances 
is to balance out their amount of time and work between 
tiie various standing problems at Harper, and not to 
discriminate between quantity over quality education, 
power procedure over outside suggestions in the voice of 
such decision making policies and in short to avoid 
what can be foreseen-prejudice in the decision making 
on tills campus and to develop pride In our present good 
education standards at Harper. 




K 



H>f?BINGER 




Fklltor-ln-chief 
Business Manager 
Activities Editor 
Photo Editor 



Diane DiBartolomeo 
Gary Zdeb 
Heidi Johnson 
Chuck Zemeske 



The HARBINGER is the student publication for the 
Harper ColiegP campus community, published weekly 
except during holidays and midterms. All opinions ex 
pressed on the .editorial page or in the columns are 
those of the writer, and are not necessarily those of the 
college, its administration, faculty or student body. 
For information on advertising, rates and publica- 
tion schedule, cali or write Harbinger Business Of- 
fice. 

VVilliam Rainey Harper ColleKe. Algonquin and 
Roselle Rds.. Palatine. Illinois 60067. Phone num 
b'T 397-3000. ext. 272 and 460 




Dear Sirs: 



4/«fflnf disagnes wHh fatwlty sfaarf 



As a former member of the committee of 
students, administrators and faculty who last 
year formulated tiie Faculty Evaluation Sys- 
tem, I feel I must write this letter. 

President Robert Powell is attempting to 
whip a dead horse, to say the least, as Mr. 
Boeke, Mr. Knight and Mr. McCabe could 
tell you. According to tiie Wheeling Herald 
(1/21/74), Mr. Powell, In a lettw to tiie 
Board of Trustees and the Faculty, said that 
the student evaluation system will "have an 
Immediate effect on the already low academic 
standards of this college." 

There are two strong statements inherent 
in this. First, tiiat by evaluating leaching 
services, of which the students are the con- 
sumers, the standards of education will im- 
mediately drop. Last year in tiie manycom- 
mlttee meetings, the facts were brought for- 
ward and shown to all (Including the Board 
of Trustees who presumably would not have 
passed tills without reviewing tiie facts) and 
the results of these facts were tiiat In the 
Institutions where tiie evaluation system was 
used, the education standards did not drop 
and In fact were raised by virtue of the fact 
that the instructor was allowed to view him- 
self tiirough tiie eyes of tiiose he was in- 
structing. 

The second pai^ of Mr. Powell's statement 
refers to a low standard of education at Har- 
per. In this I can only give my opinion. 
In the two years I attended Harper. I believe 
I received tiie best possible base from which 
to continue my own education. Harper Is 
highly respected at otiier instihitions as 
shown by tiie fact tiiat in transferring, neitiier 
myself nor any of my friends lost any hours 
and we are all doing well now. 

Mr. Powell says in his letter tiiat tiie role 
of students was to be carefully evaluated 
before tiieb- judgments would be used on 
decisions on faculty raises. 

While It was not the Intention tiiat these '" 
evaluations be used as swords hanging over 
tiie faculty heads, who is better suited to 



judge a faculty me.nber for tiiese rewards; 
a group composed of administrators alone, 
or, as is now tiie case, a group composed of 
faculty, students and administrators as is 
tiie case witii tiie faculty evaluation System. 
Mr. Powell stated tiiat tiie "primary work- 
ers of a school are the students." If Mr. 
PoweU truly beUeves tills, tiien he Is In- 
credUily naive. The student is not tiie worker 
in tills system. It Is tiie instructor, tiie ad- 
ministration anrfeven tiic Board of Trustees 
who work for tiie sttidents. To reduce It 
down to Its most vulgar terms, the student 
pays for tiie service of education which tiie 
school, as a system composed of faculty 
and administrators, gives him. To have a 
voice In directing your own education is all 
this whole thing is about 

Perhaps the faculty feels tiireatened by 
ideas like tiiU and perhaps tiiey should, 
because I as a student do not want Inferior 
quality services being given to me by a 
teacher, a politician or a shoesalesman. 

Mr. Powell is afraid, as was Mr. McCabe 
before him, tiiat tiie instinictor will be reduced 
to a classroom politician forced to play for 
students' affections ratiier tiian teach to the 
best of his abUlties. The answer to that is tiie 
same now as it was when I was on tiie 
faculty evaluation committee: if an instruc- 
tor Is a quality Instructor who genuinely 
cares about students and is involved in his 
teaching, tiie students will recognize that as 
will his colleagues. 

This along with the fact tiiat students 
only have 30% of the instruction part of 
evaluation which itself is only worth 60% , 
provide safety valves against what Mr. 
Powell is afraid of. 

In conclusion, I hope tiiat the faculty, 
the administrators, tiie Board of Trustees 
and the students can see tiiat tills new faculty 
evaluation system can only help tiie already 
fine quality of education at Harper. 

Sincerely, 

Steve Master 
Northern Illinois University 



February 13, 1974 



H 



H/f^NGER 




Lo E, 



Km 



I 



President Nixon, after a 
closed door meeting with 
several of his top aides, re- 
leased a little known docu- 
ment referred to among the 
higher ups in the political 
world as a "Gray paper " 

In this paper, the Presi- 
dent, and his Staff, outlined a 
' serious consequence, com- 
ing as a result of thevarious 
shortages that have plagued 
the country for so long. 

Recalling tiie fact that 
those shortages wereusedto 
further stimulate the econ- 
omy, as outlined by some 
bizzare economic policy out- 
line known only to the Presi- 
dent, the statements contain- 
ed in this Gray Paper are 
alarming. 

Stating that tiie -higher 
prices charged for merchan- 
dise in short 'supply,' was 
"the only alternative to "a 
tax on the taxable uxes. " 
and the resulting recession 
would give tiie president a 
stepping stone into "Phase 
XXV." the paper pointed out 
that this country is running 
out cf things to run out at, 
and urged the people of this 
country to develop new ideas, 
get them into production, and 
run out of them as soon as 
possible 

Along these lines, tiie 
president announced that an 
idea for converting gasoline 
powered engines into engines 
powered by Buffalo chips 
was being given top priority 
in steps to solve the energy 
crisis 

The benefits of tills type 
of engine are amazing This 
engine would run on these 
getting approximately 45 
miles to the pound, and in- 
stantly create a shortage of 
Buffalo chips, as the animal 
Is almost extinct anyway 
This would create the needed 
shortage, and turn a useless 



into a saleable 



byproduct 
product 

Another idea given pri- 
ority is one to harness a 
source of heating fuel for the 
home This source of 
"Natural, natural Gas, " is 
that originating from cows 
suffering from "Beanilis" 
better known as gasoronious 
exhaust 



Career library 




This move would »ieip to 
reduce the number of hydro- 
carbons released into the at- 
mosphere, as the number one 
source of this pollution 
comes from those cows 

This would be accomplish- 
ed by means of a converter 
attached to tiie tail of those 
•polluting demons, which 
would trap the gas. and pump 
It into a 55 gallon drum, 
mounted on a cart, which 
would be pulled around be- 
hind the beast. 

Althojgh these programs 
might seem a little extreme, 
the report concludes this 
"In a time of national short- 
ages, such as this . the 
means is justifiable to tiie 
ends 

Ah yes, in times such as 
these, it is good to see the 
leaders of this country go- 
ing forward with such reck- 
less abandon The only thing 
is, with all tiiese programs 
dealing with buffalo chips, 
and cow^ exhaust, the aver- 
age American must wonder 
where the government s head 
is at. 



Harper opened a small ca- 
reer library last spring in 
the Counseling Center area 
which contains a great deal 
of resource information It 
is hoped that students will 
make use of these facilities 
to assist them in making 
decisions regarding career 
choice. 

A large amount of pam- 
phlet mat^iH^Uias been gath- 
ered coveringpn-extremely 
wide range of job opportuni 
ties These are filed and 
easily accessible for student 
use When tiie re ire dupli- 
cates, students "may help 
themselves to any of these 
references 

In addition there is a com - 
plete reference file of mono- 
graphs, published by Chron 
icle. describing individual 
jobs as titled according to 
the DOT program. 



Another source of infor- 
mation is a series of bock- 
lets published by the Institute 
for Research These contain 
up-to-date Info and may be 
checked out by students for 
limited periods of time 

A number of books have 
been purchased that provide 
insight into particular ca- 
reer areas Examples of this 
type of book are Your Ca- 
reer in Parks and Recrea- 
tion; Careers in Hotel Man- 
agement; Career Opportuni- 
ties: Ecology. Conser\atlon 
and Environmental tontrtil; 
On the Job Training and 
Where to Get It. 

The self-service library 
Is open Mondays thru Thurs- 
days from 8:30 am until 
10 p.m and Fridays from 
8:30 am until 4 30 pm 
The library is located on 
the third floor of building A, 



adjoining tiie Counseling 
Center. If students would 
like assistance, counselors 
are available in tiie Coun- 
seling Center 



AH night 
film orgy 

By LARRY FREDRICK 



Mitiois slated for talent minded individials 



By DIANE DIBARTOLOMEO 

Burt Reynolds move over 
Male students at Harper will 
have the opportunity to dis- 
play their anatomy for tiie 
promotion for a career pro- 
gram at Harper 

Auditions for male models 
for tiie Dietetic Technician 
career pamphlets are slated 
fpr February 13 Pictures 
will be taken in the Practical 



SEASON'S 
END SALEl 



Nursing Lab in room D172 
The eleven Dietetic tech 
nlcian career students will 
select the candidate to pose 
for the career brochure The 
winner will pose as a patient 
in a bed and one of the stu- 
dents in ttie , program will 
serve food to him in her 
uniform 

For further information 
contact Henriette Gebert, 
Coordinator of tiie Dietetic 
Technician Program, ext 
437. 



The Program Board Is at it 
again, tills time it's In tiie 
form of an All Night Film 
Orgy This is the opportunity 
for all you people who have 
the excuse of "I work Fri- 
day night" to enjoy some of 
Harpers Friday night 
events The program is on 
Friday, February 15 at 10 
p m continuously till 5 a nj 
Featured is Woody Allen s 
•What s Up Tiger Liiy>- 
From the Marx Brothers we 
have "A Night at the Opera' 
and "The Fatal Glass of 
Beer" by W. C. Fields. Short 
films of Charlie Chaplin, 
the Liule Rascals and Car- 
toons of Pink Pantile r and 
Road Runner will be inter- 
spersed tiiroughout the eve- 
ning A true classic will 
draw up tiie rear when Lon 
Chaney s "Phantom of the 
Opera" will be shown 

Bring along your sleep- 
ing bag The films will be 
shown in the lounge and the 
admission price will be $1 



Senator speaks on 
^'Operation Reachout 



The Student Senate has a 
plan in the making called 
"operation reachouL" It 
may be the first organized 
attempt for senators to reach 
the students. We senators 
aren't going to sit around 
and wait for public opinion, 
we are going to go out and 
get it from theshidents. 

So far this year it seems 
that most of the student body 
i« wondering what we're up 
to. Hopefully the Senate's 
mysterious activities won't 
be so mysterious anymore. 
We will be asking the stu- 
dents their opinions on the 
issues, what tiiey tiilnk tiie 
important issues are, or what 
they should be. I really hoptf 
when the students are ap- 
proached by a senator, the 
students will cooperate. Talk 
to us, let I* know what you 
think and you'll have a more 
representative school gov- 
ernment. 



Respectfully submitted. 
Carole Schuh, senator 
Also there are two va- 
cancies on tiie Senate. The 
Student Senate will be ac- 
cepting petitions, and can be 
picked up in Student Activi- 
ties A 337. 

JOBS 

tVHOPE 

(SPS 17 Is 34) 

Tmpmry fmimff Immmjdim Mrimm- 

wMk f»ti»4 j»»t 'raaa4; «apl«;aca« 

fmn um k i btfara M f mtm* tm tmoft; pra. 

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r— y im mt k» gi i Ml »< ii nmmi nip 

•■ tcli*4alc4 i" (NO CHASTEBS), 

""■WMo. room, boar^ fell ^onmMMMiM^ 

For sffliftlitm tmJ lamfltl* 

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immi 

Un 110S. Mih*aMtot,.Wi«. S3301 
(or telCDhonc 414-298 6400) 



SKI JACKETS" 
20% off 

SKI PANTS 
IN THE BOOT- 
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OVER THE BOOT 
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FRENCH MIRROR CUSSES 
ret $12.95 NOW! $9.K 

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(under the water tower) 




\ 



X 



"M 



page 6 



"H/RBINGER 




February 13, 1974 



2. February 13, 1974 



T€ 



H/I^NGER 



page 7 



Pboto by Ken KiMaa 



The Association,. . A cherished concert 



By LARRY KIEL 

Friday. February 1 of this 
year, the student body had a 
chance to listen to some of 
the best music to be played 
at Harper this year. 

The Association came to 
Harper, and with a good 
balance of newer material 
and some of their older ones, 
they were able to control the 
mood of the evening, and 
leave most of the people 
there with a feeling of see- 
ing some class entertain- 
ment. 

For the first time this 
year, the accoustics at Har- 
per were not as bad as a 
concrete room in one of the 
jails that frequent the area. 
The music they played was 
well polished, as was their 
stage act Perhaps this is the 
only fault of the evening 
They didn't seem to be as 
receptive to the audience as 
were some of the other acts 
here. 

Most of their attempts at 
communicating were ob- 
viously rehearsed as much 
as the rest of their act. 

The lighting for the eve- 
ning wu the best that we 



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and 7:00 p.m. 537-4637. 

HELP WANTED on Campus I/O 
Clerk from 3 to 6 p.m. Apply in 



person Room A 101 Ask for Pckkv. 

^ART TIME CLERK. Community 
Relations Office, hrs. flexible, some 
typimc helpful. CommuaUy fWa- 
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Say "I love you" 

with more love 

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DONALD TAYLOR. 23. Viet nam 
veteran, artist, servinx prison sen- 
tence for poaacaaton ol marijuana. 
Has received no vUits and few 
lettera durtn« the past 15 months. 
Would Kladly wekome receivlnR 
ictim from any concerned sincere 
person. 

.Northern Illinois I'niversity has 
established a scholarship pro 
gram for outstandittii Junior col 
lege students. These awardii wull 
be known as l'.\IVKRSIT\' 
SCHOLAR AWARDS. The com 
mittee is interested in recrultlnff 
only outstandins junior colleRe 
students for these awards. Con- 
tact Placement & Aids OfTice for 
further information. Room /\364. 



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b'aoli nprf NoriM.dd 

TOM MORAN >■ young, honaif on^.ndoovndvn) 

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600 Woollogon Rd . Glon«iow 729 9390 



have seen here Most of the 
reason for this lies in the 
fact that amemberof the As- 
sociation's road crew was 



posted up on the balcony to 
direct the effects. 

The entire evening was an 
entertaining one. 



MCULTY 
FEEDMCK 

More and more colleges are adopting an academic 
calendar that allows students to finish the first semester 
before the Christmas break. 

For example, here's an "early" calendar just adopted 
by Rock Valley Community College in Rockford: 
FaU Semester, 1974 
August 22 ( Thursday) 
August 26 (Monday) 
August 26 (Monday) 
September 2 (Monday) 
September 3 (Tuesday) 
November 28, 29 (Thursday, 
Friday) 



Final Registration 
F"aculty Conference 
Classes begin, 6 p.m. 
Holiday. Labor Day 
Late Registration 
Holidays, Thanksgiv- 
ing 
Last Day of Cli 



Final Exams 
Grades due at Record 
Center 



Faculty ConferencM 

Registration 
Classes begin 
Late Registration 
Holiday, Good Friday 



Spring Vacation 
Last Day of CI 



December 13 (Friday) 
December 16-19 (Monday 

through Thursday) 
December 23TMonday) 

Spring, Semester. 1975 
January 13, 14. 15 (Mon.. 

Tues., Wed.) 
January 16, 17 (Thursday, 

Friday) 
January 20 (Monday) 
January 27 (Monday) 
March 28 (Friday) 
March 31 -April 4 (Men. 

through FrL ) 
May 13 (Tuesday) 
May 15, 16. 19, 20 (Thurs.. 

FrU, Mon.. Tues. ) FIna* Exams 

May 23 (Friday) Grades due in Records 

Center, Graduation 
The Harper calendar, in contrast, will be similar to 
those of past years, the semester starting after Labor Day 
and ending In mid-January. 

The advantages of the early calendar are obvious. 
The student avoids the lame duck class meetings of early 
January where he's forgotten much of what he learned 
before Christmas. He also gets a chance to transfer at 
the beginning of the second semester to universities using 
the early calendar. It has advantages for teachers too. 
since it's discouraging to teach bored students in lame 
duck classes. And though they lose a week or so of their 
summer vacaUon when an early calendar is adopted, 
the longer break afler Christmas gives the teacher as well 
as the student a chance to at least dream of getting out 
of our miserable climate for a week or so at the coldest 
time of the year. 

The disadvantages of the early calendar are first 
that it may interfere with late August family vacations 
and second that mothers of children in grade school 
can't attend classes until the grade schools open after 
Labor Day. 

The Rock Valley calendar attempts to overcome these 
disadvantages by allowing late registration the day after 
Labor Day. The second semester offers few problems 
At Rock Valley they will start the second semester on 
January 20 and allow late registration as late as Janu- 
ary 28 to take care of mid-year high school graduates 
ActuaUy, if they had been wUllng to abolish the spring- 
vacation or end classes as late as May 20, they could 
have started second semester classes on January 27. 

Which calendar you prefer depends on your point 
of view. LTnmarrled students may prefer the rapidly 
spreading early calendar. Mothers of smaU children may 
prefer the other calendar. Both groups should make their 
preferences known. 

Name Withheld 



\ 



WomM's gyniMstk team foces o6sfodes 



By DIANE DiBARTOLOMEO 

A growing but sometimes 
overlooked sport at Harper 
is the Women's Gymnastics 
team Miss Bolt is the coach 
for this intramural sports 
activity. Traveling with a 
squad of seven women, the 
team competes in such 
events as the k)a lance t>eam. 
uneven parallel bars, floor 
exercises and vaulting. 

"I know we would probably 
get more women on the team 
if there was practice on cam- 
pus," expressed Miss Bolt 
The team practices at Hoff- 
man Estates High School due 
to the lack of physical Ed 
facilities caused by the fire 
last June to Harper s field 
house Coach Bolt pointed 
out the definite drawback 
from that standpoint is not 



being able to practice on 
campus limits our practice 
We have to work around 
Hoffman Estates programs 
"The girls have to find their 
own means of iransporta 
tion to the high school, 
added the coach 

On Dec 14 the gymnastic 
season started with a tri- 
angular meet at Kiswaukee 
College The Ha'-per team 
placed second with a score of 
66.45, Triton first place 
75 60. Kiswaukee third 
57 80 With only one return- 
ing member from last year s 
squad. Miss Bolt was ex- 
tremely pleased with there- 
suits of this meet 

On Jan 25. 1975 Harper s 
team captured first place 
with a score of 71 95, Oak 
ton 70 45, and DuPage45 10 
The team suffered its first 



loss in its three- year his- 
tory to Triton and Oakton 
on Feb 1 Harper finished 
third in the meet with 69 45 
This was two points over 
last weeks win with the 
same squads of Oakton and 
the College of DuPage On 
an individual basis, Carrie 
Hubbard captured first place 
on vaulting with 6 95 

The team consists of on 
the Beginning Level Carrie 
Hubbard. Sandy Paster. Nan 
cy Brooks. Anne Thomas, 
Jenny McCurdy. Mary Jo 
Koertgen. Lisa Wuestenfeld. 
and Martha Seitz competing 
on the intermediate level 
Jenny McCurdy is the only 
returning memt)er 

"They all have an interest 
in the sport They acquire 
self discipline, individual 
improvement and confi- 
dence." said Miss Bull 




Ma. BoU coaching a 
n asUsta miiat travel 
practke. 



team of seven women gym- 
to a local high ackool for 



AH and Frazier, fight or farce 



By GLEN SCOTT LEWIN 

In 1971. Muhammad Ali 
and Joe Frazier fought what 
had been termed as 'the 
fight of the century." 

The fight itself was not all 
that exciting, with Frazier 
defeating All by points four 



rounds before the fight was 
scheduled to end 

However, as with most 
major sports challenges ot 
the recent past, politics 
played a major role in de- 
termining the popularity of 
the opponents 

In 1971, Joe Frazier was 



3Uick CemnienLx 



By DENNIS SOBOJ 

This is the first of a 
four part series by Dennis 
Soboj who plays Left Wing 
on the Harper Hockey team 
Through his column he hopes 
to give Harper students an 
insMe look at who the play- 
ers are. 

Introducing number two 
line offense and defense 

JohnRebora, Center. gen- 
erates er»ergy into our team 
At practice he has shown 
initiative in leading the team 
in workouts In his position 
working together^ with the 
wings, he keeps the play 
moving Defensively. a 
strong fore-checker. John 
is the first man In the zone, 
digging for the puck and 
passing to his forwards This 
has accomted for a lot of our 
scoring success. 

Paul Buck. Right Wing; 
Paul is one of the better 
skaters on our team and be- 
cause of this good stlckhand- 
ling ability he gets the puck 
at center Ice in our break 
out play and brings it in the 
zone. His slap-shot has ac- 
counted for many goals and 
consistently leads the team 
in scoring In our first game 
with Madison Tech. he 
knocked the goalie out on the 
first period with a slap- shot 
and changed the direction 



of the game. 

Nick Pauly. Left Defense 
A complete defenseman. and 
a good stlckhandler. he has 
a hard shot, a strong hit- 
ter and heads- up player In 
the game against Du Page 
College he was sif>erb 
Clearing the opposing play- 
ers from the slot, moving 
the puck out to the forwards 
and controlling his offensive 
point 

Marc Wald. Right Defense 
This Is Marks first year 
with the team, playing to- 
gether with the rest >af our 
defense he is learningV^ot 
He has been consistent inall 
of the games He too. has a 
strong shot from the point 
and fits well with our hard- 
hitting defense His best ef- 
fort was against Madison 
Tech. One -on-one, he took 
the opposing player out of 
the play and issued one of 
the solidest checks I'veseen 

The second line is the 
strongest skating line. Al- 
ways consistently applying 
pressure and making plays, 
keeping thL- offensive game 
alive O'jr line has scored 
first in five of the seven 
games We've been an even 
match and better against the 
teams we played; the only 
regret was our ineffective- 
ness against Du Page. 

Next week's "Puck Col- 
umn " will cover the first 
line. 



far more popular than Mu- 
hammad All Frazier was 
softspoken. he handled his 
money well, and he was a 
Christian All in all. Fraz- 
ier was a good repr^senta - 
tlon of a "white man's nig- 
ger." 

Ali. on the other hand. 
was brash, outspoken, a draft 
dodger who had changed his 
name and religion, which 
turned many people against 
him 

Ali was defeMed and the 
All American Hero, Joe 
Frazier. wasthe victor; good 
over evil, rlghf Wrong Mu- 



hammad All had beliefs and 
Ideas that people didn't un- 
derstand or approve of, bit 
he wast)y no means aphony 
After their 1971 fight, All 
continued to help the Black 
Community, spending money 
as well as time to sif>port 
the people that he believed 
In Joe Frazier. though, 
lainched a night club act in 
which he sang and danced. 
The group was^ppropriate- 
ly ruuned 'Joe Frazier and 
the Knockouts." which had 
a fairly large nightclub fol- 
lowing 

Joe Frazier sang and 



danced his way into in- 
evitable defeat, by loslnghis 
short lived dtle to George 
Foreman, who retains It to- 
day 

Both fighters figured that 
last week would be the final 
match between them. Fraz- 
ier because he thought he 
would smother All for the 
last time, and Ali, because 
he figured that once he beat 
Frazier there would be no 
question as to «4)o was the 
better of the two Having 
fought so well. All will more 

(Turn lo page 8) 



Harper radio covers Hockey gomes 



The Harper College radio 
station. WHCM, is going lo 
broadcast all Harper Hawk 
hockey games to the college 
on a delayed basis this sea- 
son 

All home games being 
played at the Rolling Mea 
dows Sports Complex on .3900 
Owl AvenueSaturdaysat 4 30 
p m will have a play- by- 
play description of the game 
taped and rebroadcast 
throughout the campus the 
following Monday night and 



Wf rif Hads 9asw§rs 

sz 



some Wednesday nights All 
out-of-town games will be 
similarly broadcast with the 
possibility of some games 
being played live over the 
closed circuit station 

The WHCM crew working 
the games is Ken Schrein 
er. producer director and 
play-by-play announcer (Ar- 



lington Heights). Marc Mar- 
ine, color commentator 
(Hoffman Estates). Ron An- 
derson, producer -technician 
(Evanston). and Bob Yeoman, 
technical assistant (Crystal 
Lake) 

Broadcast time Monday 
and Wednesday nights Is 7:55 
p m. Live game times have 
not been determined 





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.4 



February 13, 1974 



H 



H>I?BINGER 



pages 



BIRDS OF REY 



RMPD-Friends of Harper sports 

In the last issue of the HARBINGER, our sports edi- 
torial brought some comment from members of the Athletic 
Department here at Harper, and from members of the 
staff of the Rolling Meadows Park District 

While the main purpose behind the editorial, and the 
column, PUCK COMMKNTS, was to set the mood for 
helping the Hockey Club here become established as a 
Varsity Sport, there are those who feel that the Rolling 
Meadows Park District was not given a fair shake. 

While we did have a few things to say about the ice at 
the Rolling Meadows Sports Complex, things that were not 
all that favorable, we have to commend the Rolling Mea- 
dows Park District for servkres that they have rendered 
to us in the past semester. 

During the summer, and through part of the fall, the 
RMPD made available to the Hawk Football team the 
use of their fields, their locker rooms, and occasionally 
their swimming pool. For this they charged Harper 
nothing. 

Jhe Professional Program Methods Class used the 
gym for 24 hours. The Intramural Basketball program 
used the gym for 64 hours. For the above 88 hours of 
time, the RMPD charged the coUege $150, instead of the 
usual $928. 

For 24 hours last semester, the Ice Skating Class used 
the park facilities. The hockey team used the ice for a 
total of 52 hours in 8 weeks. The usual charge for this 
amount of tee time is $2,860, the RMPD charged the col- 
lege $1,200. It shoukl be noted that for the ice skating 
class, the RMPD also Included at no extra charge to the 
oolkge, a pro Instructor. 

Since the time of publication, the ice at the Rolling 
Meadows Sports Complex has Improved considerably. It 
was explained to the reporter doing research for this 
editorial that a good part of the problem was that during 
the month of December the Ice was under constant usage, 
a fact which didn't allow for maintenance time. 

We wish at this time to state that there was no malicious 
intent In the past editorial. Our charges about their Ice 
were admitted to be true by various personnel from the 
Park District. 

However, the condition of the Ice is only a small part 
of a larger picture, and in this pkrture the Rolling Mea- 
dows Park District stands as one of the Friends of the 
Sports Program here at Harper College. 



WRESTLERS NEAR SKYWAY TITLE 



STUDEBAKER 



NOW PLAYING 
7 WEEKS ONLY 



THE CHAMP! 

TONY PULITZER H.V. CRITICS' 
AWARD PRIZE AWARD 

FORRESTpog^^ 
TUCKER ""^'^^ 



kt% 



THAT 
CHAMPIONSHIP 

SEASON 



"CHAMPIONSHIP SEASON"; 
A SUPERCHARGED WINNER 

William Lconard- 
Chicago Tribun* 



SEATS NOW ON SALE 



I 




Coach Ron Bessemer was 
happy to have his team fi- 
nally meet some competi- 
tion. Last week the Hawk 
wrestlers faced squads from 
Waubonsee. Blackhawk, Uni- 
versity of Illinois J. v.. 
Schoolcraft of Michigan and 
nationally ranked Forest 
Park of Missouri The Hawks 
took four of the five 

Against Waubonsee. the 
Harper wrestling team 
trounced 34-6 In a Skyway 
Conference meet. The Wau- 
bonsee Chiefs' only win was 
at the 150 category Steve 
Francovic and Al Gordon 
had superior efforts Facing 
the Blackhawks. Tom Dal 



Campo had a 15-4 decision 
Ron Vylasek had a 4-1 tri- 
umph. Ken Trommer's tie 
added the final points in a 
close 19- 15 victory 

Bemie Klienman and Steve 
Glasder headed the assault 
over the Illini in another 
close match Klienman took 
a 3-0 decision against Kurt 
Wiesenborn The final was 
19-18. 

Harper's victory over 
Schoolcraft was a come- 
from - behind effort Again 
Bernie Klienman with a three 
decision. Ken Trommer a 
13-1 blitz, Glasder eased out 
a 3-2 decision and John Sil- 
ver collected a 3-2 count as 



well. 

The only defeat was 
against Forest Park, a nar 
row 22-17 set back Forest 
Park is ranked ninth in the 
nation. 

Bernie Klienman and Al 
Gordon took wins andackli- 
tional points were collected 
at end by Glasker, Uylosek 
and Silver. 

They defendedtheir title in 
tournament this past Satur- 
day at Waubonsee. Scores 
are not yet available as of 
this writing 

We hope the team brings 
another championship to 
Harper, retainingour super- 
ior standing in athletics 



Harper tops Mayf^ir and McHenry 



Harper s final game In the 
month of January ended on 
an up-note Harper fought a 
close game and defeated 
Mayfair Junior College 80- 
77. The game was a see-saw 
battle in which the Hawks 
employed a man to man de- 
fense which utilized the fast 
break Harper's high scor- 
ing players were ^eveHeldt 
- 21 points. MikeMillner- 22 
points, the scoring by ha Ives 

Mayfair 33-77 

Harper 32-80 

After comingoffawinover 
McHenry. the Hawks racked 
up still another win by de- 
feating the College of Elgin 
72 - 61. This was another 
closely fought battle in which 
Harper used a man to man 
defense and the fast break 
in the closing minutes of 
play Harper's leading net 
ters were Steve Schmitt with 
20 points. Mike Millner with 
18. and Steve HeWt with 17 

The Harper basketball 
team balanced their confer- 
ence record when they de- 
feated McHenry on Saturday. 
February 2 

The Hawks 89 over Mc- 
Henry s 76 was due to their 
combined strong offensive 
and defensive effort In the 
first half 



"We shot well Intheopen- 
ing half" said the Hawk 
coach. Roger Bechtold Be 
cause the Hawks were in a 
zone defense, they limited 
only outside shots to Mc 
Henry. 

Because McHenry couldn't 
beat Harpers strong de- 
fense, they only made 12 of 
the 39 shots in the first half 
Of their 40 attempts the 
Hawks manageda meager 20 

During halftime the Hawks 
were leading at 46 to 27 
Their brief 30 point lead 
was earned In the early part 
of the second half. 

The defense weakened for 
the Hawks In the second half 
as McHenry trailed at II 
points The Hawks lad 60 
rebounds while McHenry had 
32 

The Hawks have won two 
straight Skyway Conference 
games to even their confer- 
ence mark at 5-5. Their 
over all record Is II 12 



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Harper's §lev» Heldt goes op for 
two agatest Mayfair. 

(Pboto by Cbork Zemenkt) 



AMnihr 



(Coot from Page 7 ) 

than liki'ly go on to challenge 
the future heavyweight crown 
holder, who he will probably 
defeat 

Another fight between All 
and Frazier would be use- 
less. Nothing would be pro- 
ven no matter who wins In 
fact, another fight would tend 
to become a rivalry, not a 
challenge Frazier, now too 
old for professional boxing, 
will probably sing and dance 
his way into oblivion, where 
he will be right at home 

There are certain aspects 
to this fight other than the 
fighi»rs political and reli- 
gio»i.s lu liefs The fighters 
attiiiidi' played a major role 
a.s to who was the more 



popular of the two All play- 
ed it cool and confident, as 
he did in the 1971 match But 
Frazier was touchier and 
more easily upset than he 
had been In 1971 . in short 
he didn't have theconfidence 
that a fighter needs The 
Saturday before the match 
the two fighters held a press 
conference, which ended up 
in'ti shoving match as both 
fighU'rs rolled to the floor 
Whether or not the shoving 
was staged, there was genu- 
ine hatred on the part of Joe 
Frazier, whose reputation 
had been put on the line 

What Joe Frazier feared 
most did occur, he lost in a 
poorly fought battle, and 
there will always be doubts 
in p«>oples minds as to 



'whether Joe Frazier was 
really better than Muham- 
mad All. even if a third 
match is staged and even if 
Joe Frazier wins 

Looking to the future, the 
only reason another match 
between these two fighters 
would be staged, is If the 
promoters were to believe 
that they could make a kill- 
ing off of a grudge match, 
which I doubt. 

People are getting tiredof 
the AH -Frazier legacy and I 
believe that it should end 
right here, with each fighter 
winning a "big " score, which 
will be talked and argued 
about for years to come, 
even if it wasn t the fight of 
the renturv 



L 



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TE 



H/1RBINGER 

William Rainey Harper College, Algonquin and Roselle Roads, Palatine, Illinois 60067, 312-397-3000 



Vol. 7. No. 17 



February 18. 1974 



SSHC CITES CONSTITUTION AMENDMENTS 



The Student Senate at 
Harper has proposed 
changes to the present 
SSHC Constitution Stu- 
dent Senate President 
Robert Hayhurst cited 
larger representation 
and input as the Senate's 
basis for amending the 
present constitution, 

which has been in effect 
since May of 1972 

One of the four changes 
proposes that all officers 
shall be elected within 
the first three weeks of 



the Fall Semester The 
term of office shall ex- 
tend to the completion of 
the following Spring Sem- 
ester. The present con- 
stitution states that all 
officers shall be elected 
within six weeks prior to 
the completion of spring 
semester. 

The studentbody willbe 
represented by five sen- 
ators elected at -large in 
stead of the usual seven- 
teen representatives 
They will be elected with- 



in the first three weeks 
of Fall Semester All re- 
cognized active clubs 
and organizations may 
also have one representa- 
tive as a senator und^r 
one of the new proposals 
This representative, 

either an officer or mem- 
ber, will be elected by 
a majority vote of the 
club membership The 
representatives will be 
elected during Fall Sem- 
ester as soon as theclub 
is activated The club 



Kiel and Pesche 
appointed to senate 



By DIANE 
DiBARTOLOMEO 

On February 14. Larry 
Kiel and Mark Pesche 
were appointed to the Stu- 
dent Senate to fill the 
vacancy left open by 
Senators Stacey Bueschel 
and Doug Janis Kiel and 
Pesche were the only two 
who filed petitions 

The term of office for 




Senator Larrv Kipl 
(Photo bv Donn L.xiiifni 

these two Senators emls 
at the completion of 
Spring Semester 1974 

New Senator Larry Kiel 
has been active as a mem ■ 
her of the HARBINGER 
staff for the last semest 
er He has held both the 
position erf Photo Editor 
and Managing Editor 
However. Kiel's, inter- 
est in Senate is nothing 
new. In the past he has 
been active at Student 
Senate Meetings and has 
helped out with publicity 
and elections that the Sen- 
ate has sponsored Sen- 
ator Kiel also look a stand 
against the proposedab- 



olishment of tuition re- 
bates offered to clubs 
and organizations last 
November 

In the candidates state- 
ment as to why he is run- 
ning for the position, he 
said.'During the fall sem- 
ester. 1 took an active 
Miterest in the student 
body, and attempted to 
improve the lot of the 
students here through my 
association with the 

HAKB!Nf;ER 

I have, in he past, been 
active at Student Senatt- 
meetings andhavehelped 
out with publicity on a 
number of"^ occasions I 
have also be«'n active in 
all of the electioas h« re 
iin campus 

In the past I havedem 
castrated an ability loor 
tinnizv. plan and tarr\ 
«»ut proposal.s lhav(>alsn 
been able to function i»s 
a mediator on occasions - 
something I think that the 
Senate could benefit 
from 

I am not afraid to speak 
- and yet. have the abil- 
ity to see both sides on 
most issues ' 

Kiel also expressed an 
interest for looking into 
the faculty evaluation 
system - proper lighting 
in the pr.rking lots, the 
parkinr, situation, andthe 
feasibility of initiating a 
Photo cirriculum at 
Harper 

Mark Pesche a grad- 
uate from .^rlingti.'H Hign 
School was also ap- 
pointed to the Senate last 
Thursday s senate meet- 
ing. He will have the op- 



portunity to get involved 
in student government for 
the first time, thru his 
position as Senator 

Pesche wants to inves- 
tigate the present reg- 
istration system at Har- 
per, as he has heard com- 
plaints from students In 
his statement to the 
Senate Pesche said 'Be- 
ing a member of the Stu- 
dent Senate gives me an 




senator Marli Perchf 
iPhnUt b> Donn l.\nam) 

opportunity to gather and 
collect views of the cam- 
pus that would not be 
available to me as just a 
student In a totally com 
muter school, such as 
Harper, most students 
feel that they don't really 
have any say in the run- 
ning of . the school, 
most don't even care to 
But there are important 
policies which do effect 
each and every one of us. 
Id like to get involved 
Although I have no pre- 
vious experience in stu- 
dent senate. I feel I could 
accept and manage this 
responsibility " 



members will also fill 
vacancies among their 
representatives in. this 
manner 

Another proposal in- 
cludes the appointment of 
a parliamentarian from 
within the Senate by a 
majority vote of the SS- 
HC The|)arliamentarian 
would have the same 
rights and privileges as 
other -seniators I'nder 
the present constituiion 
the parliamentarian is 
appointed by the Pre- 
sident 

A quorum, now defined 
as a majority of Sen- 
ate, would then be a 
majority of the officers, 
senators at- large. and 
representatives of the 
recognized active clubs 
and organizations who 



designate a representa- 
tive. 

Any vacancies occur- 
ring among the five sen- 
ators elected at -large 
will be filled by any stu- 
dent petitioning the 
SSHC The student must 
be elected by a major- 
ity of votes cast by the 
SSHC Presently, this 
holds true if there are 
less than three vacancies. 
Three ormore vacancies 
would constitute' a gen 
eral election 

These proposals must 
be passed by a two -thirds 
vote of Senate and a maj- 
ority vote in a referen- 
dum to be held this 
spring, before put into ac- 
tion for the 1974- 75 scho- 
ol y^ir Senate will vote 
on the proposals some- 
time in March 



HEW intervenes 
in Harper affairs 



By LARRY KREORK H 

The government particu- 
larly the Department of 
Health. Education and Wel- 
fare, lias sleppe<l into Har 
per territory this time cal 
ling for an ernl to jfjl> dis 
crimination bysex r-iire and 
ethnic background 

Through a program knfm-n 
as Affirmative .AiHni thi 
school will not imh 
eliminate discriniin.niMn 

against wt)m«'n ant! ?nnioritv 
group members. Inii in at- 
lively recruit iheni VVil 
liam Mann Vice I'resiflent 
of Husiniss Affair' it ilir 
per is no« in thi i i m. ■ --'- nf 
developing a (>• it 



will be accpetbble to every- 
one concerm-d. hopefully by 
July first 

The action came to the 
attention of the school last 
week in a program presented 
to collegee-mployeesthrfjugh 
a variety of speakers Re- 
presentatives of HEW talked 
of methods that might be 
useful in ending the problem 
that se«ms to fxist at Har 
per 

Also sptdking was .-"tale 
Representative Eugenia 

Chapman a pioneer in the 
field of equal rights She 
is credited as being one of 
the principal backers of the 

(Turn to paxc i> 



William Mann 
vice-president of 
RusinesK Affairs 
is in the process 
of developinx a 
program in 
support of 
women and 
minority groups 




« 1 



< 



\ 



L..,....M 



J 



page 2 



T€ 



H/R6INGER 



February 18. 1974 



February 18. 1974 



H 



H/1RBINGER 



page 3 



BY SUE POLLACK 

AND KAYO OLESKEVICH 

Another Harper registra- 
tion period has gone by 
and many students have 
again emerged with sore feet 
and a schedule of classes that 
they did not really want. 

The most common student 
complaints have also in- 
cluded a lack of real coun- 
seling about courses, not be- 
ing able to get cards for a 
convenient registrationtime 
inaccurate computer 
printouts, and computer 
malfunctions inthetermin- 
als themselves 

Several students who.were 
interviewed after spring 
registration reported that 
the counseiorshad approved 
their schedules without ad- 
vising themastoprerequisi- 



Registration relief in siglit 



tes or difficulty of the 
courses they had chosen. 
Consequently, they ended up 
in the wrong classes. The 
confusion was attribiled to 
the long lines of people wait - 
ing to see the counselors and 
the pressure this created to 
hurry through. 

Another problem is that 
the class printouts posted in 
many of the campus build- 
ings are not always current. 
Several students mention- 
ed having made out their 
complete schedules from the 
printout in the cafeteria. 
only to be told at the Tinal 
registration terminal that 
some of those classes were 
closed. This entailed, of 
course, a return Crip to the 



Com-pool results 
look favorable 



By DIANE DIBARTOLOMEO 

The idea of initiating a 
Computerized Car Pool Sys- 
tem was turnedto the student 
body to determine the need 
of having one on campus 

Students were polled in the 
January 28 issueof the HAR- 
BINGER The results of the 
survey indicated that Har- 
per students are in support 
of initiating the new system 
on campus. Three hundred 
and sixty nine students indi- 
cated that they would be in- 
terested in participating In 
a Computerized Car Pool, 
and. twelve responded neg- 
atively. 



Now thai the Student Ac- 
tivities Office is aware of 
the support, they are looking 
further into the development 
of having one on campus. 

Ms Hope Spruance. advi- 
sor of the Senate committee 
that is investigating thepos- 
sibiliUes of initiating the 
system, explains that not 
until the middle or end of 
March of 74 could this Sys- 
tem be utilized. 

But she views the survey 
as a stepping stone in reac- 
hing what seems to be a 
favorable service to Harper 
commuters, initiating a co- 
mputerized car pool system 
on campus. 



printout and counselor, as 
well as waiting in line all 
over again. 

"And isesides all of these 
problems," one freshman 
commented, "the loucy 
computer blew its fuse or 
something twice before I 
even got to it! 

Counselors, faculty mem- 
bers and administration a - 
like insist that there is noth- 
ing wrong with Harper's cur- 
rent registration system. 
'Mr. Donn 8 Stansbury. Dir- 
ector of Admissions and 
Registrar, stated that the 
college is doing everything 
it can to accomodate the stu- 
dents by offering more 
registration dates and more 
time- to meet with coun- 
selors. 

The counselors and pro- 
fessors also agreed that for 
a college as large as Har- 
per, registration goes quite 
smoothly and rapidly They 
said that students should be 
able todetermineprerequis- 
ites by looking in the cat- 



alog, and that very few stu- 
dents took advantage (A the 
counselors who were avail- 
able both during and prior 
to registration. 




Mr. Stansbury, Director of 
Adiri.s8ions and Reflstrar, 
insists there is no problem. 

Mr Stansbury indicated 
that nearly 4000 students 
registered early before 
Open Registration, and that 
2500 registered byphone He 
added that there is a com- 
mittee selected to evaluAe 
registration each semester 



and bring up new ideas as 
to how it can be improved 
for the following semester. 
So far the committee has 
not come up with any idea 
for next term, or any of the 
problems w*iich students 
have had in the past. 

It seems that the sooner a 
student gets in toseeacoun- 
selor, the earlier he will be 
able to register. If the ed- 
ucation process is one that a 
student hasto beat out every- 
one e Ise to get what he wants . 
then some students will al- 
ways be discrimated against 
and left dissatisfied with the 
delays that this system costs 
them. 

Though the administration 
feels that registration is 
fine the way it is. many stu- 
dents disagree. Perhaps by 
next fall some changes 
will have occurred to make 
the process eveneasjer Un- 
til then, students can again 
look forward to the lines, 
sore feet, and second- choice 
classes. 



Harper sponsors ''Espana Special" 



Harper College will spon 
sor a tour to Spain (the Es- 
pana Special) through the 
Group Travel Associates, 
from April 12 through April 
21. 



The tour leaves Chicago 
via an Air France flight and 
Arrives in Paris. Orly Air- 
port, with a connecting flight 
to Malaga. Spain Deluxe 
buses will transport you to 



R.M.S.C. extends services to Harper 



By HEIDI JOHNSON 

Have you noticed lately 
that ma>'be you've been de- 
veloping a "sparetire"? Im- 
possible, you think You're 
too young, righf But the 



"energy" crisis hashitHar- 
per campus, due to a lack of 
exercise You can overcome 
the crisis, get some exer- 
cise and still have fun How? 
By coming to the Rolling 
Meadows Sports Complex 




Now you can 

protect yourself 

againtt muggert. rapit 

and worse with ihu 

•mazinq new wrhistle Wear it~ 

a« a necklace or carry it at a key chain lij long Mnge 

penetrating ihrill brings help in a huny The next d.nk 

"'gti' (that's tonight') you'll feel a lot safer lust knowing 

you have the greatest protection m the woild. Gives 

obscene phone callers a shrHlinq eaiful too 

GET IT BEFORE YOU HAD ITi 



COMf IN on MAIL HANDY COUPON 

ytt> I KKHnl lo IM «»y«l' S^rHt m» loorton Lili«.|^iiiln 

K»v Cham _N«kl»c» INumhjtl rh.nm. 

I tnctoM $5.00 for ttactf Londcm-Like 
Whi«!i» t undefsiiinct ih«i ,( f *m noi 
lolstlv Mttff.«d. I wiM r«c»ivr A comp4«ft 
'«'und il reiufn«d in lOdiivt 

NAME , 

STREET NUMBER 

CITY _^ %■ 



Family Jewcit Ltd 

3431 «Vm Villwd A>*nu« 
MihxuliM Mtieonvn S3?09 



(RM.S.C) 

The R M S.C has opened 
the gymnasium and meeting 
rooms to the public, free. 
Men and womenmaypwrtici- 
pate in basketball, volley- 
ball, paddle ball, badminton, 
ping-pong, bumper pool, air - 
hockey, football, pool, and 
there's even a golf net to 
practice your golf swing. 

The Sports Complex is 
open to men (18 years and 
Voider) on Tuesdays, from 
630-9 .30 p m . andto women 
(18 years and older) on Mon 
days, also from 6:30 - 9:30 
p m This service continues 
to the end of the academic 
year More information can 
be obtained by calling .394- 
4381 or Harper, ext 371 



Hotel Oro. where you will 
be staying and ei\joying the 
Costa del Sol (Coast of the 
Sun) The hotel is located 
in Torremolinos. anAndalu- 
sian fishing village on the 
Spanish Mediterranean. 

Tourists will receive a 
welcoming "Sangrai" and 
orientation at the hotel. Mul- 
tilingual guides will be as- 
signed to the group The last 
night will be spent in Paris 
Optional trips include side 
trips to Granada, the ancient 
mountain -top town of Ronda, 
and also Tangle rs 

WKat wtllyou do there"* 



You can play tennis, jai 
alai, ftsh. swim, beach comb, 
and sail. There are also 
five golf courses on the sea. 
You can see old castles, 
churches and villages, and 
ride a horse or rent a taxi 
burro or a Vespa You can 
girl or guy watch from the 
terrace cafe 

The ten-day trip is only 
$397. which includes tax and 
service. A car for two per- 
sons may be rented at an 
additional $15 per person ) 
For more information, con- 
information. contact Hope 
Spruance. Activities Office, 
A-336 



^HEW intervenes 



(From paice 1) 



Equal Rights Amendment in 
the IllinoisGeneral Assembly 
and by appearances, a 
staixich WometK Libber 
Her message to the audience 
received much applause 
from the women w*ien she 
spoke of total equal rights 
to women, including a view 
that women should be drafted 
as men are (or were) 

The program may be an 
encouraging note for a lot 
of the higher-ups ' at Har- 



Speiial alit'fiiion to 
Today's hm^vn 




per because It offers an op- 
portunity to solve theproblem 
before it becomes a messy, 
drawn-out affair Asoflate. 
the administration has let 
things get a little out of hand 
when problems have sur- 
faced. 

P«wtr plait rtctivts 
/Ptrnit froM EPA 

Notice has been received 
that the Harper College pow- 
er plant is operating under 
standards set by the 
Environmental Protection 
Agency. 

An official permit to oper- 
ate theplant hasbeenreceiv- 
ed from the Illinois EPA by 
Robert Hughes, physical 
plant director at Harper. 

"We are very pleased that 
the plan, which was designed 
in 1966. needed no changes 
to meet the specifications of 
the EPA The standards are 
set up mainly to reduce air 
pollution." Hughes stated 



Dental hygiene services offered 



BY DIANE 

DIBARTOLOMEO 

Rising tuition rates, 
food bills, and gas prices 
make it more difficult 
for everyone these days 
to meet their bills To 
help curb expenses the 
Dental Hygiene program 
at Harper is offering their 
services at half the cost of 
regular dentistry work. 

Open to anyone, the 
clinic only charges to 
cover their supplies For 
performing prophylaxis 
(cleaning teeth), the cover 
charge is two dollars. 
Four X-rays are also In- 
cluded in the package 
which would cost any- 
where from eleven to 
twenty dollars elsewhere 
The x-rays are sent to 
the patients dentist to 
diagnosis, after they are 
developed by students in 
the program. For ap- 
plying preventive agents 
such as topical flourides, 
the charge is between one 
and two dollars. 



' The clinic is in its ' 
second year of opera- 
tion and is open four days 
a week The forty -two 
students enrolled in the 
career program have 
the opportunity to per- 
form practical exper- 
ience at the supervision 



Dental hygiene clin- 
ical and classroom facil- 
ities are located ir 
Building D (the science 
building) They feature 
an up-to-date dental hy- 
giene clinic completely 
equipped with modern 
dental units, ultrasonic 




of four licenced Hygien- 
ists 

The dental hygjlenisr 
also provides counseling 
for patients on general 
oral health 



prophylaxis equipment. 
X ray stations, audiovis- 
ual. latx)ratories. and 
patient reception areas 
For appointment call ext 
434 



SENME SP&KS our 



By ROBERT HAYHURST 

This past Senate meet - 
ing many important dec- 
isions concerning you 
the student have been 
reached First of^ all 
the two new students 
have been placed on the 
Senate, they are Law- 
rence R Kiel, and Mark 
Pesche In going over 
their respective qualif- 
ications for tlje job. I 
can highly recommend 
them t>oth. 

Recently the Student 
Senate has elected to 
send myself and another 



Student Senator. Stan Sap- 
ieha to a convention in 
Washington. DC This is 
a very important one, it 
affects G I Benefits and 
the possibility of low 
ering the college tution 
and raising the amount 
of grants and loans avail- 
able through the Fed- 
eral Government Stan 
and I will be meeting 
with Senator Stevenson. 
Senator Percy, and our 
Representatives in Con- 
gress for discussion of 
these proble-ns and other 
ones affecting; Harper 
We will have two days 



Dorothea hangers "American 
Exodus^^ on exhibit here 



An exhibition of phoio 
graphs by Dorothea l.ange 
many taken during the Di' 
pression period in the in.<Os. 
will be open to the public 
at Harper College Febru 
ary 16 through March 17 

There is no admission 
charge to the exhibit which 
is entitled, "An American 
Exodus " The exhibition may 
be viewed on the first floor 
of the Learning Rtsourcfs 
Center during regular col- 
lege hours 

Twenty-five of the black 
and white photographs re- 
corded the American De- 
pression period, when the 
victims of the machine and 
drought were forced to mi- 
grate west to the irriyated 
farm.s of California 
Ten prints show the end 



of the road '- -photographs 
of the cities of the early 
1950s 

In 19.39. Dorothea l.ange 
and her husband published a 
book of her photographs en- 
titled An American Exo- 
dus ' After her death in 
1965. her photography col- 
lection was donated to the 
Oakland Museum by her hus- 
band. Paul Taylor 'An Am- 
erican Exodus was repub- 
lished ir August 1969 using 
many p lotographs from the 
museum collection 

The exhibition at Harper 
has been made available 
through the Smithsonian In- 
stitution It is sponsored by 
the Harper Program Board 
and Cultural ArLs Committee 
and financed by student ac- 
tivity fee.s 



for a private question and 
answer period. 

I will make a presen- 
tation on it when we come 
back The Senate Is in 
the process of making 
changes in our Constit- 
ution that will create 
a totally new and for the 
most part increase Sen- 
ate representations This 
is one of the changes. 
Clubs and Organiza- 
tions each elect to send a 
member to the Senate 
Thereby raising the 
membership andproduc- 
tivlty 

We have joined a new 
Student Government or - 
ganization. the Associa- 
tion of Community and 
Junior Colleges 

The cost of joining was 
$25 whereas the cost for 
becoming a member of 
theAssociationof Illinois 
Student Goverrunent will 
cost us $225 00 It is my 
opinion, that two organ- 
izations that basically do 
the same job for student 
governments, we should 
definitely go for the one 
that is less expensive 
It is a membership for 
only a one year period 
then a government must 
renew it for another one. 
This fee that the A I S G 
charges is ridiculous 

I am sure that I can 
find students and faculty 
to back me up on this 
decision The next Sen- 
ate meeting is February 
28. room A-242A 

I would like to see more 
students at our meetings 
I will continue to keep 
students posted on .Sen- 
at? matters that concern 
them. 



GILQM[>IR 
OFB^MS 

On Campus — 

Mini-course, Charting of the Stock Market, with em- 
phasis on how to make charts and an objective look 
at the current research, both pro and con, being done 
in technical analysis, Feb. 19 & 21, 7:30-9:30 p.m., 
A 242b. Register in Student Activities Office, A 336! 

"The Other", fllm, Feb. 21. 12 noon, E 106, 50 cents. 
.Photo Exhibit, Feb. 18-Mar. 17, First Floor, Bldg. F. 

Coffee House, Feb. 19. featuring Rose-Hip String Band. 

"Versus", Feb. 19 & 20, campus television (channel 
6), program focuses attention on human conflicts 
which may have been prevented by collective defense. 

Music - 
• Chicago Symphony Orchestra " University Night" Con- 
cert, 8:30 p.m., Feb. 27. Orchestra Hall. Lukas Foss, 
conductor-pianist. Performances include: Symphony of 
Wind Instruments (Stravinsky). Clavier Concerto. D. 
Min. (BVrV 1062) (Bach), Pianissimo (Schnittite) & 
Fantasy, "FranccMa Da Rimini", Opus 32 (Tschai- 
kovsky). Tlckeu from $2.50-$5.00, studenU 25% dis- 
count. Ph. 427-77 n. 

Burt Bacharach, Arie Crown, Feb. 22-23. 

Engelbert Humperdinck. Mill i^un The., Mar. 1-10. 
Ph. 298-2170. 

Stephen Stills at the Auditorium. Mar. 8. 

Johnny Winter, at the Amphitiieatre, Mar. 13. 

The I^ettermen, Arle Crown, Mar. 15. 

Two Generations of Brubeck at the Auditorium. Mar. 
16. 

Seals & Crofts, at Arle Crown, Mar. 16 & 17. 

Poco, Mar. 24, at the Auditorium. 

Display Showing — 
"A Tribute to John Tlnney McCutcheon". during Feb.. 
at the Elk Grove Public Library. McCutcheon was the 
chief cartoonist for the Chicago Tribune, best known 
for his work, "Injun Summer'. Ph. 439-0447. 

Theatre — 

"To Be Young. Gifted and Black," opens Feb. 19. 
Goodman. Ph. 236-2337. 

"Awake and Sing", opens Feb. 19, Forum The. Ph. 
496-3000. 

"The Odd Couple", opens Feb. 21. Arlington Park 
Theatre, Ph. 392-6800. 

"Waltz of the Toreadors", opens Feb. 25 at the Black- 
tone. Ph. ST 2-2280. 

"The Button". with Chuck Connors. Drury Lane Thea 
Ph. PR 9-4000. 

"No Sex Please, Were British", at Pheasant Run, Ph. 
584-1464. 



) 
I 



I 



Statatine Wd Centex 

401 N. Norttiwest Nwr 
PiMm. Ill (0067 

10% Off 25% Off 



♦ 
♦ 



I 




THE BOOK STORE 

5 W. Campbell 
Arlington Hgts., IH. 

5 A.M. -10 P.M. 

EVERY DAY 

Books, Magazines, Newspapers, 

Study Guides 

SMo'kERS NEEDS 



page 4 



K 



H>1RBINGER 



February 18, 1974 



February 18, 1974 



ourpur sP 

Steps to strengthen 
Student Senate 



The student Senate is reaching out to involve all 
students at Harper College for better communica- 
tion and representation standards They are doing 
this through revising the present constitution, rea- 
lizing that our present structure is inadequate in 
many areas. 

Trying to meet the needs of a student body with 
over 8,000 students is not an easy job The Sen- 
ate, by calling a special session for Tuesday at 
2 pm in the Student Activities office, is opening 
itself to a critical look of its organizational struc- 
ture. It is hoped that by doing this, the student 
body will attend the open door session Since it 
involves all of us directly or indirectly, it 
would be to everyones benefit to attend By 
offering suggestions, plans, criticisms, or by just 
coming to familiarize oneself with the functions of 
their government, you can help your peers in this 
turning point 

Student government needs support in order to be 
a truly effective, influental power in representing 
your voice. The appropriateness of a strong stu- 
dent government originates from the belief of 
freedom. Students will not be prepared to be 
leaders in a democratic society if their spirited 
interest in government is influenced by-«pathelic 
forces, namely you, who in the past have done 
ni/thing. Nothing in the sense of involvementor 
any expression of interest in your student govern- 
ment 

Studpnt Kovernment can work only if an ample 
amount of the students have a stake in its future. 
It should be the goal at both the student body 
and Senate to formulate the structure of which we 
receive effective representation 

The Senate has a great potential, which is 
being hindered by the majority of Harper students 
The issues that have been discussed before the 
the senate are usually thought by some to be 
trivial and meaningless This is a fallacy, which 
creates an obstacle to further affairs of the 
senate 

Without the support of the entire student body, 
the confidence nefd«>d in our student reps and 
Senators will be affected, which will directly 
affect you the student 

The HARBINGER. WHCM and other organiza 
tions on campus can only provide a limited amount 
of the support that the Senate needs In the past 
it has usually been the organizations within student 
activities at Harper who have participated and 
supported the affairs of the Senate Working with 
in this narrow span accomplishes little and in turn 
accomplishes little for the student body 

In view of the importance of the Senate under- 
taking this endeavor, it is hoped that students will 
see it the same way. as it affects all who attend 
this college 

So we at theHAHniNGKP propose the s. steps 
Steps to Strengthen Student Governmenl 



1. Attend student senate meMings. which are held 
every other Thursday at 12 noon A -242- a. 

2. Put out . Get involved in committees Com 
mittees to reconstruct senate Student Conduct 
Committee Legal Service Graduur on Com 
mittee - Curriculumn Committee - Institutional 
Committee Athletics - Student College Committee 
Environmental Health and Safety Committee Pub- 
lications Committee Student Awards and Recog- 
nition - Harper Energy Committee - PublicTrans- 
portation to Harper 

3. Act Now. don t wait till it is to late to do some- 
thing. 

4. Take Pride in your representatives, lend sup 
port. 

5. High school days are over, the power is all 
yours 

6. Your decisions can make or break the success 
of the student government. 



INPUT 4. 



Student voices on 
book return system 



After suffering through 
three semesters of Harpier 
College. I have become to- 
tally exasperated with the 
book return system employ- 
ed at the book store. 

How can this establish- 
ment claim to be a non- 
profit organization when all 
you see are list prices? It 
certainly would be nice to 
have a madatory supplies 
without draining our fhianc- 
es. 

For example when you try 
to sell your book back they 



will only give you fifty per 
cent of what you originally 
paid, then eighty per cent. 
.For instance last year 1 
bought a 12 dollar geology 
book which after onesemes- 
ter the book store gave me 
six dollars for. I then went 
to the book store the next 
day and found my of-iginal 
book which they were selling 
for $10 75 - almost a five 
dollar profit 

I also have had my share 
of eleven dollar books that 
the book store refuses to 



buy back for various rea- 
sons; they have refused to 
buy back books from me be- 
cause they are not in good 
enough shape when three 
months ago they were in the 
same shape and worth $5.25. 

I and I'm sure other stu - 
dents would like to know 
how much profit the book 
store is making and where 
this money is going. 

In conclusion. Harper book 
store is the biggest though 
not the only, rip-off on cam- 
pus. 

Cyndee Moderhack 



iHe cup fjae a f,oU 



Nixon is my shepherd I shall 

not want , 

He leadeth me beside still 

factories 
He restoreth my doubts in 

In the Republican party 
He guldeth me to the path of 

unemployment for party's 

sake. 

1 do not fear evil for thou art 

against me 
Thou annointest my wages 

with freezes so that my 

expenses runneth over my 

income. 

Surely poverty and hard 
living shall follow the 
Republican party 

And I shall live in a rented 
house forever. 

5.000 years ago Moses said. 

"Park your camel. 
Pick up your shovel, mount 

your ass. 
And 1 shall lead you to the 

Promised Land " 

5.000 years later F D 

Roosevelt said. 
Lay down your shovel, sit 

on your ass. 
Light up a Camel, 
This is the Promised Land 

Today, Nixon will tax your 

shovel, 
sell your camel, kick you in 

the ass, 
and tell you there is no 

promised land 

1 am ^lad 1 am anAmerican: 
I am glad that 1 am free. 
But I wish 1 were a little 

doggie. 
And Nixon were a tree. 

» Submitted bv 
G. Zdeb 



Letters welcome 




mi 



H 



H>1RBINGER 




Kdltor-in-chlef 
Business Manager 
Activities Kditor 
Photographers 

Cartoonists 



Diane DiRartolomeo 

Gary Zdeb 

Heidi Johnson 

Chuck Zemeske, Dan Kliar- 

sky, Ken Kissam 

Steve Schlosser, .Juan Nunez 



Contributing Staff 

Greg Conway, Larry Frederich. Rich Kusnierek .Glenn 

Lewin, Sue Pollack, Dennis Soboj, Kayo Oleskevich. 

Advisor: Mr. Sturdevant 

iht" MAKIilN(;KK i,s thf sludtnt publication for Ihc 
Harper College campus community, published weekly 
except during holidays and mid-terms. All opinioni> ex- 
prcAMcd^iii;) the editorial page or in the columns are 
tht)se of the writer, and are not necessarily those of the 
college, its administration, faculty or student body. 
Kor information on advertising, rates and puolica- 
tion schedule, call or write Harbinger Husiness Of 
ficc. 

William Kainey Harper College. Algonquin and 
lioselle Kds.. J'aialine. Illinois 600')7. Phone nuni 
b'T .'JHT-.iOOO, oxt 272 .m'd 4H0 



«H>1RBINGER 



page 5 



You are a child of the universe .. . 
no less than the trees and the stars you have the right to be here" 



Miseri Cordia. mean 
ing the Heart of Mercy, 
was founded in 1921 as a 
maternity hospital and 
home for unwed mothers 
and their dependent 
babies. Since 1954. the 
Center has been work- 
ing with mentally and 
physically retarded 

children, so with your 



a child reach his fullest 
potential; and to provide 
a medium through which 
parents of retarded 
children are helped to 
accept their problem and 
plan for the future. 

The physical struc- 
ture of Misericordia 
Home allows for services 



eludes registered nurses, 
licensed practical nurs- 
es, child care tech- 
nicians, nurse attendants, 
speech therapists, phy- 
sical therapists, psy- 
chologist, orthopedic 
consultant, pediatrician, 
play program person- 
nel, teachers, self -care 
trainer, program co- 




i«<h §4 ut was mad* by CodI 

b«awtiful in Hit min«f t ay*. 

Thosa of u* that twrnad out tewnd 

should look across owr shewldars one* 

and holp tha waak onas to thair foot. 

It only takas an owtstratckad hand. 

I. AAcKmmi 



support of thecut-a-thon, 
you can help these help- 
less kids. 

The purpose and objec - 
lives of Misericordia 
Home is to provide a 
homelike atmosphere for 
the children, coupled with 
medical and nursing care; 
to provide training prd- 
grams designed to help 



to one hundred and thirty 
six children All types 
of mentally retardedbab- 
ies are accepted begin- 
ning at one month of age 
regardless of race, creed 
or national orgin 

Misericordia is man- 
aged by the Sisters of 
Mercy The suff in- 



ordinators, dietician 

social workers. office 
personnel, and mainten- 
ance and domestic em- 
ployees Misericordia is 
in consuitt use 24 hours 
a day. seven days a week 
The parents of the 
children have formed a 
parent association which 
meets monthly This 



Pom Poll squad performs at ISU 



By MINDY LOU BOLES 

Harpers Pom Pom 
squad got their taste of a 
big audience Feb 9. at 
Illinois State University 
They received a near- 
standing ovation for the 
first time to a crowd of 
more than 4.000 people 
during the ISU - Chicago 
State Varsity basketball 
game 

The 16 -member squad, 
under sponsor Mary Mc- 
Caskey. was cordially in- 
cited by IS Us pom pom 
girls, the Coryphees, to 
perform during the half- 
time of the Harper ISU 
Junior -varsity game. 

Performing to Grand 
Funk's. "American 

Band'" and Carole 

King's, "Corazon," the 
squad was then asked to 
do their routine again 
between the halftime of 
the varsity game 

Many segments of their 
routine was disrupted as 
"ahh.'s ' and applauds fil 



RESEARCH 



Thousands of Topics 
$2.75 per page 
Send tor irour up to date, ISOojge 
mail order catalog Enclose tl 00 
to cover postage 'delivery time is 
1 to 2 daysi 

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LOS ANGELES CAUf 90025 

213 477 8474 or 477 5493 

Our r«t(|fc^ mjitnji ,, 50 j .- , 



led the large gym Quot- 
es from the audience ar- 
ranged around 'that they 
haven't seen a good per- 
formance in such a long 
time, not even by the 
Coryphees'' 

Sophomore members 
on this years squad are, 
Co -Captain Connie Do- 
lan, Ramom Godinez, 
Joyce Hulle.-, Veronica 
Krugler, Co- Captain Ca- 
thy Noxon, Kathy McKor 
mack, Cindy Regas. Cap 
tain Francine Spores. 
Karen Shuttleworth. and 
Deb Twitchell 

Returning freshmen 
Include; Doreen Ahola, 
Barb Bush. Kathy 



Left Row (front lo back)- Fran- 
eint Spore*. Cindy R(ica». Kalhy 
MrKormack. Calhy Noxon, 
Veronica KruRlrr. .Sue Scliwab, 
Joyce Holler. Doreen Ahola. 

RiRht Row (front to back) — Drh 
Twitrliell. Karen ^ultleworlh. Ei- 
leen Smllb, BatW BuKh. Mona 
Godinese. Connie Dolan. Katby 
Saye. Sharon WhltlnK. 



Saye. Eileen Smith, and 
Sharon Whiting 

They concluded the 
season with their last 
performance given Feb 
16 at the last home bas- 
ketball game 




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'Ote Confed^niifil As*.s"j''i:f' 

'ei niino'ior. •>• fiogiTiry 



organization is active m 
keeping informed of 
changes in policy and 
legislation for the men- 
tally retarded; in keeping 
informed on happenings in 
the home, and in helping 
the Home with a yearly 
fund raising benefit and 
miscellaneous activities 
This organization is open 
to the parents of the child - 
ren in the Home, parents 
of mentally retarded 
children; and interested 
persons 

Tours of the Home will 
be made possible upon 
pre-arranged requests 
It is felt that this ex- 
perience will awaken an 
interest in the problem of 
menul retardation and to 
cr««te a less emotional 
and better undersunding 
of the health problem 
All of the above men- 
tioned is what makes up 
Misericordia There are 
many more incidentals 
which could be included 
The important factor is 
that the woven thread at 
love and concern per- 
meates the entire atmos- 
phere of Misericordia - • 
Misericwdia meaning 
"Heart of Mercy ' 



A twenty- four hour "Cut- 
a-thon" will be given for the 
Miseri Cordia Children's 
Home on February 23 be- 
ginning at 6 p m All pro- 
ceeds from the event will 
be donated to the home, which 
is located on the South Side 
of Chicago 

Five Chicago area Hair 
Shop beauty salons, located 
in Robert Hall Villages, are 
sponsoring the event 

All volunteers who will cut 
hair are expert hairstylists 
who are specially trained to 
give precision scissor cuts 
and blow styling The doiM- 
tionis $3 95 

The ' Cut-a-Thon" willbe 
held at the Sheraton Walden 
in Schaumburg on Route 62 
west of Route 53 

Those wanting to partici- 
pate are asked by the com- 
mittee sponsoring the event 
to have their hair sham 
pooed. as shampooing facili 
ties are not available 

There will also be a $25 
cash prize for the girl with 
the lon«eat hair who attends 
the "Cut-a-Thon." whether 
or not she has her hair cut 

For more information call 
459-5940 



f 



CUladsiftpde 



] 



SubM - I Bedrtwm Apt. than 
rug, A/C, laundry room, t'lub- 
bouae for partlca. biUardt. elc . 
lennl* courto, pool. 15 min. from 
■clMMl. Only $ 190.00 Call SSS- 



PART TIMK CLKRK. i ommuniiy 
Kelationii (WTire, hr» flexible, some 
typins helpful ( onunualty Rela 
Hona C>frk« or caU SfT-MOO *%L 



5-n<c* Aroualic band (ACSEN- 
SION) looklnK for comeonc ex- 
paiitncad in electronics and in- 
lenMid In running our CBX 
tound tyiitenn Contact Janet or 
Judith 358-2227. 

foil KAI.f'. Ilottttv i.<4iji,iiii. lit 
N'ei»-. A: I'Md fioahe Kx^uipnwnt. 
,.,,.,, , 88.^-.T1IMI. 

AHAKiMt SI ^OR RrnI; I Ik-d 
r«Mim (iiriM'tifl iipt Mnvf. rcfriKtr 
ator. KiirbdKi' (lt<i|><iiital. air rtin- 
ditioiiii.M. ilofrmiin hM. $l75/mo. 
HH.1 .-,0-.»5». I inda. 

l>ROKKS.MO\AI. TVPINC 

Ihimts. i(im|>((>iili'>ns, ctr 

NO .va-vi? or vo 7 nam 

FIHHKR SKIS with BimUmm. 
Prile*. .ind Boot.i (sl/c 9) Aimo.M 
never used, paid over S2fiO. A»k 
ing $ia.5 Call Wendy R!»4-.'>796. 

1970 NOVA KOR SALK .Stand 
ard :i speed shifter on floor. V 8 
Kngine. 327 h(»rsepower. Asking 
$9(K>.(H) (all between .'5:(Mi p m. 
and 7:00 p.m. 537-4K.'l7. 



Ainenton's Wbmen Center 



•.' 1 iM-v t . 

pt; : : ( ,.i.i 


'\ (111 -J 111 

lier 

h\ IV 1 1,.. • 



DONALD TAYI.OR. 2X Viet nam 
veteran, ariini, wrvmg prison sen- 
tence for poaaasaion of marijuana. 
Has received no visiu and few 
letters during the past 15 months. 
Would gladly welcome receiving 
letter* from any concerned sincere 
person. Contact Donald K. Tay 
lor, •1.15972. P () Box 787, Luc 
asviUe. Ohio 4SH4(L 

northern lllim^ t'nivarsity has 
established a scholarfihip pr«>- 
gram for outManding junior col- 
lege students. These awards wull 
be known as INIVKRSITY 
H( HOI.AR AWAKDS The com 
mittee is interested in recruiting 
only outstanding junior college 
students for these awards. Con- 
tact Placement & Aids Office for 
further information. R«mm A3(i4. 



The St Thomas of Villa - 
nova Home and .School As- 
sociation invites the public 
to an Interesting and infor- 
mative evening. Ttesday, 
Feb 19. 8 pm , in the par- 
ish hall, 1141 E Anderson 
Drive. Palatine, featuring a 
talk by Martha Zara. Ed D , 
specialist in learning dis- 
abilities and learning and 
behavior problems Dr Zara 
will discuss many questions 
of interest to both parents 
arxl teachers. 



t.** 



X 



'^ 



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page 6 



f€ 



H/IRBINGER 



February 18, 1974 



Hockey team defeats Madison and Parkside 



By KIEL AND SOBOJ 

The Hawk Hockey team, 
after a long bus trip to 
Madison. Wisconsin de- 
feated Madison Technical 
College by a score of 
9-6 

After falling behind for 
the first time . the 

Hawks were able to take 
advantage of a break 
which left the Mn.-fon 
Tech goal in the trust of 
inexperienced goalie. 
Anderson 

Anderson, a defense - 
man for Madison Tech 
was called upon to tend 
the nets early in the first 



period when Paul Buck 
scored his first goal of 
the £i.{ne. catching the 
regular Aladjson Tech 
goalie on ' the ankle, 
breaking the same 

Buck's goal came 10 15 
remaining into the first 
period of play. 

Sven Overland put the 
Hawks out front 13:42 in- 
to the first period by 
scoring against the Tech 
goaltender. Eight se- 
conds later. Dave Con- 
nelly scored his first 
goal of the evening to 
give the Hawks a three 
to one lead at 13:50. fol- 
lowed 13 seconds later by 



Hawks bow to Worriors 



By GLENN SCOTT LEWIN 

The Harper Hawks, led by 
coach Roger Bechtold suf 
fered the most humiliating 
defeat of the season, losing 
to Triton. 100-76 As with 
many games, the final score 
was not representative of the 
type of game that was played 
The Hawks stayed within 
reach, but never led. the 
closest they came to uking 
the lead was at 12 53 of the 
first half, when the score was 
tied at 12 apiece. Coach 
Bechtold feltthat foul trouble 



in the game With 9 11 left 
in the game the Warriors 
took the initiative and len- 
gthened their lead. 74-60 
In the next 16 seconds the 
Warriors made what could 
have been a close finish, 
into a disaster With less 
than four minutes leftTriton 
scored 1 1 straight points 
with their hundreth pointco- 
ming on a layup in the last 
ten seconds of play The 
Hawks leading netter was 
Steve Heldt wiUi IK Mike 
Millner racked up l)> arKl 
Neary. the sam«' .soiiK plu 



Hawk Gary 
I pint>rrion tripji 
for (»n axainst 
r.lKin in what 
rnuiri hi* Irnnod 
tl>r must humili- 
atinx dpfpat nf 
the .sraiwii. 
(Phtilo b.v 
('buck ZPNiPMko 




hurt them in the first half 
At the end of the lirst half 
the Hawks trailed the War 
riors by II points During 
the second hulf ihr Hawks 
pulled to wuhin Idiir (K)ints 
with alxiut t»'n uiiniiles left 



yer to loul out <on'd li 
points For the season the 
Hawks are 6-6 in conference 
play 

Score by halves Harper 
Harper 43-42-76 
Triton 43-57-100 



202 S. Cook St. 



Barrington 



DARKENS 



FO/f 



^S^"^^ 



Full Stock Adidas Shoes track-tennis casual 



a score from Nick Pualy. 

The Hawks then took a 
break for the next minute^ 
atxl four seconds before 
Terry l.ee scored at 15 
11 and Dennis Soboj scored 
at 15 03 

In one minute and 21 se- 
conds, the Hawks scored 
five times, taking ad- 
vantage of Tech Goalie 
Anderson. 

To finish the scoring 
for the period. Dave Con- 
nelly once again scored 
18:34 into the game, to 
give the Hawks a 7-1 lead 
at the end of the first 
period. 

The next game was 
February 2 against Col- 
lege of DuPage. . The 
Hawks toughest game. 
The final score was 4-2 
DuPage. but it was more 
than even match and 
Hawks definitely out - 
skated DuPage The vic- 
torious coech was quoted 
as saying "I hope we 
don't see you again " 
Dave Connelly and Steve 
Bird scored the Hawk 
goals 

The Madison Tech re- 
match was February 8. 
and this time Tech suff 
ered from a long bus ride 
The Hawks put it to Mad- 
ison early, demonstrat- 
ing tough play and hard 



W§m§a'$ gymnasfk 
team ^ealrs /■ kst 

On Feb. 1. 1974 the Har- 
per Womena' Gymnastics 
team traveled to Triton and 
placed 3rd with a score of 
69.45. Oakton placed '2nd 
71.90. and Triton, Ist. 
78.60. 

Individual scores were as 
follows: Vaulting: Sandy 
Paster 5.10, Nancy Brooks 
5.00, Carrie Hubbard ^.95. 
Uneven Parallel Bars: Anne 
Thomas 4.95. Carrie Hub- 
bard 5.75, Sandy Paster 
5.36, Mary Jo Koertgen 
5.10. Jenny McCurdy 5.45. 
Balance Beam: Carrie Hub- 
bard 6.20, Anne Thomas 
5.75. Nancy Brooks 7.00. 
Jenny McCurdy 5.45. Floor 
Exercise: Nancy Brooks 
6.00, Jenny McCurdy 
6.26, Mary Jo Koertgen 
4.80. Carrie Hubbard 6.45, 
Sandy Paster 5.20. 



skating. It was 4-0 atthe 
end of the first period, 
and a Hawk game all the 
way after 

On February 10, the 
iceman took a little trip 
to Kenosha to even the 
series with Parkside Col- 
lege Both teams looked 
flat: and possibly the 
Hawks playing their 
worst game, however they 
still put it to the Rang- 
ers with a 7-5 victory. 
Carl Delia got his second 
win as Hawk netminder 
and Paul Buch collected 



his 



two goals to retain 
scoring lead 

The biggest games of 
the sea.son are coming 
Saturday February 16 ag 
ainst Triton College and a 
rematch Sunday the 17th 
against DuPage The 
Hawks will be going all 
out for these games, be- 
'cause they will determine 
championship st»ndlngs 
as well asnational invita- 
tions The Hawks are op- 
timistic, with rewards in 
reach they will be out 
there skating 



SUuk CommenLx 



By DENNIS SOBOJ 

The first line offen- 
sively on the Harper 
Hawks Hockey team. Con- 
nelly. Bird and Longer 
are the veterans The 
style of play has proved 
to be aggressive and 
strong In our toughest 
test so far. the first 
line accounted for the 
Hawks ohly two goals in 
the 4-2 loss against Du- 
Page Teamed with two 
defense men who played 
on the football team. 
Heatly and Leo. the first 
line combination is the 
most scoringest on the 
team 

Individually 

1st line - veterans, all 
second year Contribute 
factors to success ag- 
gressive strongest Du- 
Page game 
. Tom Langer - LW 
Dave Connelly - Center - 
Hat trick(2)madisonspe- 
tjdster** Good position 
Steve Bird - R W - mor 
ion rush, hard shoot 

Keven Leo - L D. ■ foot- 
ball players, good rush 
ers 

Rob Heatly - R D foot 
ball players, good rush- 
ers, football players in 
jury 

Tom Langer, Left wing. 
is the fastest skater on 
the first line Tom s ef 
fectiveness lies primar- 
ily in his work along the 
boards and behind the op 
ponent s net Dodging de 
fense mea «-hile con 
trolling the puck to pass 
in front to the center 
Good body coordination in 
close situations, has ex- 



For the best buy on your 
New or Used KONOm CAR 

SEE —Jim Dvorak 

AT TOYOTA & VOLyO VILLAGE 
ROUTE 31. SO ELGIN ILL 741-2100 



cellent moves, and very 
consistent player You 11 
see T Langer in the 
assist column c^ten 

Dave Connelly. Center. 
Dave has earned a couple 
of nicknames in a few of 
our past games A- 
mong them Hat Trick" 
and Speedster " Dave 
has scored three goal 
hat tricks twice this 
season and speedster 
comes from our 9-2 win 
over Madison Tech when 
he beat a defenseman at 
our blue line to the puck 
and raced down ice to 
score Good position 
player, has a good sense 
of putting himself right 
in front of the net. not 
close enough to get bounc- 
ed around, but in a good 
position for a shot He's 
number two in scoring 

Steve Bird, Right Wing 
Steve is hardest shooter 
on the first line, scores 
more frequently with 
good, hard wrist shots 
Good. stickhandler and 
good one -on -one against 
defensemen In our first 
game against Morton Col- 
lege, he took a full rink 
rush, skated around all 
five players and beat 
the goalie Steve also 
works a lot of peiialty 
situations He s current- 
ly third in scoring, but 
very close 

Kevin Lea. Left De 
fense and Rob Heatly. 
Right Defense I chose 
to write about Rob and 
Kevin together because of 
a lot of similarities in 
their play which con- 
tributes to the aggres- 
siveness of the first line 
Both are rushing defense - 
men with goodstickhand 
ling ability Very hard 
hitting and deadly at the 
points Kevin scored the 
first Harper goal of this 
season against Joliet In 
our man advantage situa- 
tions Rob and Kevin will 
be the defensemen on the 
ice Rob has excellent 
pass control. bring- 
ing the puck out of the 
zone Kevin bursts out 
setting a pace for the of- 
fense. 



1 



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TC 



H/1RBINGER 



William Rainey Harper College. Algonquin and Roselle Roads, Palatine, Illinois 60067. 312-397-3000 



Vol. 7. No. 18 



February 25, 1974 



ICCB gives ok to second site 



By DIANE DIBARTOLOMEO 

Reflecting on past legisla- 
tion of the field house. Har- 
per Administrators pushing 
for a second site seem to 
havegiven up predicting what 
the Higher Board will do 
next 

Bill Mann. Vice President 
of Business Affairs expres- 
sed his opinion of Harper 
acquiring the second site 
about two or three years ago 
He is still arguing that, if 
we don't do something about 
the site today, when we get 
out there, there will be no 
place to put the campus 
buildings." 

■'At least it appears, at 
this point that the Illinois 
Community College IViard 
agrees that a second .site 
should be planned for But 
you can t really count on 
anything, said Mann 

The pessimism that pre- 
vailed over Harper admini 
strators did not vanish when 
the ICCB gave them per 
mission to go ahead with 
planning for a second campus 
on February 15 Harper 



officials could forsee what 
they would next havutoface 
the approval of the lllinoi.s 
Board of Higher lulucation 

The approval from ihe hi- 
gher boardon March 12 could 
open the way for Harper to 
ask the Arlington Heights 
Village Board to set aside 
a 146 acre site on Palatim* 
and Schoenbeck roudsforthe 
college 

Last month IBHK officials 
asked the Arlington HeighLs 
Village Board to delay for 
sixty days, a college r.qiusi 
that the site on Palaliru- .itHl 
Schoenbeck roads hu desit! 
nated for educational us*- «»n 
a village master plan 

Under the Illinois law. 
once a parcel of land has 
been set aside for educa 
tional purposes anoth.r 
proposal for the land cannot 
be drawn up and submitted 
for one year 

There is no doubt that the 
early purchase of land would 
give the state an investment 
Recently at the corner of 
Algonquin and Roselle roads 
one acre of Harper land was 
sold for $26,000 In 1965 



when Ha rperpurchased their 
present site, the acreage was 
going for 5 thousand If 
that s not saving the tax- 
payers money I don t know 
what is. " said Bill Mann 
When the masterplan for 
the college was adopted a 
year ago. officials also began 
planning for a second site 
The plan calls for a second 
campus by the early l!*H()s 
to accomodate a projected 
enrollment of 22.500 full and 
part time students There 
are currently I. 'J . 500 stu- 
dents enrolled at Harper 
In order for Harper to 
qualify for a second campus, 
enrollment figures must ex 
ceed a recommended maxi- 
mum of 6000 PFE day stu- 
dents Becaus*' Harper's 
enrollm<'nt projections will 
exceed that recommended 
maximum bythemid- 1*>7() s 
planning for the second site 
had to begin this year 

The proposed site at Pa la 
tine and Schoenbeck roads is 
on the Arlington border 

Its location was deter- 
mined by the tola I papulation 
in the townships of Harper s 
district which include: Bar- 



rington. Inverness. Schaum- 
burg. Elk Grove. Wheeling 
and Palatine Mann said 
"actually fifty percent of the 



Barrington joined the dis- 
trict after the second site 
was purchased a year later 

Harper may again gain 



Student achievement 
winners recognized 



By HEIDI JOHNSON AND 
DIANE DIBARTOLOMEO 

On February 14. Mary 
Gayie Floden and Kenneth 
Kryzwicki were named as 
recipients of the Student 
Achievement Recognition 
Program awards The pur- 
pose of S AR P . which is 
to honor individual student 
achievement and focus atten- 
tion on the Illinois Junior 
College System Both stu- 
dents will receive their a- 
wards ($ 100 and a name plate 
for the plaque in the Col- 
lege Center) on March 4 at 
noon. They will also be ho- 
nored at the Spring Awards 
Banquet in May On March 
15 they will compete with 94 
applicants in the District fi- 
nals. 

To be eligible, students 
had to have applications sub- 
mitted by January 28andhad 
to have conpleted at least 
12 quarter or H semester 



hours They also had to show 
leadership in a field of study 
service to the community and 
participation in college ac 



torfwyinMt Prospect. Vir 
ginia Hayter. Mayor of Hoff- 
man Estates: and Mr Ed- 
ward Kenna. a trustee in the 




Happy Mary Floden, standing next to the achieve- 
men; plaque, where her name will soon be In- 
serted. (Photo by Ken Kissam). 



tivities About thirty can- 
didates were chosen at Har- 
per. 

The students were judged 
by Mr. John Haas, an at- 



Elk Grove Township Win- 
ners were chosen based on 
the degree of progress made 

(Turn to Page 2) 




Shown above is the proposed second site, aboal 
10 miles dlsunt from Harper. 



population will be in Wheel 
ingand Elk Grove townships 
The balance would be in Bar- 
rington. Palatine andScha- 
umburg " There is now fifty 
eight per cent of the popula- 
tion in Wheeling and Elk 
Grove alone 



more land area In Elgin and 
a small area near O Hare 
airport A redistrlctlngwill 
will be finalized on July 1 
of 74 
This however will not af- 

(Turn to pac« t) 



Assoc, degree in 
liberal arts offered 



A new Harper degree pro- 
gram. Associate in Liberal 
Studies (A L S ) now enables 
students to design ffnd shape 
their own study programs. 

The new degree will re- 
flect neither a baccalaureate 
nor an occupationally -orien- 
ted program, bi* insteadwill 
involve general education, 
liberal studies. academic 
enrichment, and learningfor 
its own value, 

The student can work out 
a program contract with the 
college indicating the content 
of his study program The 
degree will be based upon 
this contract 

The student might select 
courses from regular cata- 
log offerings, apply learning 
experiences, or explore spe- 
cialized interests 

Each student would be re- 
quired to complete a mini- 



mum of nine semesterhours 
of credit under three dif- 
ferent divisions of struc- 
tured or self -directed ac- 
tivities The seminars might 
also involve individualized 
instruction. utilization of 
community resources, non- 
traditional methodology, and 
extending the campus to the 
"outside " world 
Less structured and rigid 
than current degree pro- 
grams, the A LS degree al- 
lows for greater student 
choice in courses, and more 
flexibility in pursuing spe- 
cialized interests and apply- 
ing life experiences The 
ability to transfer courses 
would depend on those 
Chosen 

Transfer Dean John R 
Birkholz indicated that the 

f (Turn In pacp 6) 



Veer CounseVmq Series 



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page 2 



K 



H>f?BINGER 



February 25. 1974 



StwdMt Athievement 



(CobL from Page 1 ) 

toward achievement of their 
goals, success in overcom- 
ing those obstacles or chal- 
lenges which may have pre- 
vented attainment at the 
goals, individual initiative 
personal development and 
overall record in scholar- 
ship, activities and com- 
munity service. 

A mother of three, return- 
ing to college. Mary Floden 
had to find an adequate job 




Kenneth Kryzwlckl was re- 
cently named to the achieve- 
ment award. 

to support her family Her 
husband is unable to work 
because he has multiple 
sclerosis She decided on 
mursing as a career because 
i t is one of the most needed 
and is a good paying fob 
Prior to her husband's il- 
lness Mary was employed at 
Chicago Wesly Memorial 
Hospiul as a medical pho- 
tographer Mary expressed. 
"I very much enjoyed work- 
ing with people in the hos- 



pital at that time." So she 
started to look ahead to nur- 
sing as a career. 

Mary is presently enrol- 
led in the Registered Nursing 
Program at Harper, as a 
full time student. She is also 
the President of the Second 
year Registered Nursing 
Club, and was President last 
year of the L.P.N. Club. 
At the Bond School she is 
actively involved in the PTA 
actively involved in the PTA 
When she first came to 
Harper she was enrolled in 
the LPN program. After 
three months in theprogram 
she was surprised tofindout 
that she would soon be ex- 
pecting a baby. However, 
she continued with the pro- 
gram, and on June 4 had her 
baby and started Chemistry 
class on June 8 In the fall 
she started the Degree Nur- 
sing program. 

Because she could not 
meet the expenses of all the 
classes required tograduate 
intwo years. Mary earned 
credit thru the CLEP tests 
She stressed that, "all stu- 
dents should look into this, 
as it saves a lot of time 
and money." CLEP is col- 
lege earned credit. It is 
given for practical exper- 
ience already learned She 
earned 15 hours in onehour, 
by taking the test. 

Mary plans on continuing 
her education in an under- 
graduate program at the Un- 
iversity of Illinois She said. 

(Tarn to Page 6) 



Say "I love you" 

with more love 

than money. 




^ 



For(u*ltM.tnlacl. 

Yes we have tme quality 
diamonds fort 98 And on up 
to>30bo You llfmdtheminany 
oneof Our stores And you II 
appfeciate two rules every 
Hollands employee lives by 



First, we never high pretsure. We 

prefer that you shop slowly and 
carefully Look at only those 
diamondsthal you can afford We 
have a large selection m your price 
category Ash as many questions as 
you like We II give you alt the 
answers Straight 

Second, since 1 910our policy of ' 
relurnir>g your money if for any 

reason you re not satisfied 
So if you have the love and a little 
bit of money we have the right 
diamond for you 



Petitions available 
for Harper Board 



Hollands Jewelers 

Diiwiiliiwn I I'l S \\,il>,iv)i t VI r^r- in Cl.i/.i l.ikrhursi WDiulliild 



Nominating petitions for 
the membership on the 
Board of Trustees of Har- 
per College may be filed 
from February 27 to March 
22. The election is sched- 
uled for April 13. 

Candidates will be brief- 
ed before the election at a 
board meeting set for March 
28 at 7 p.m. 

Four seats will be up for 
election this year. The terms 
of board members Ross Mil- 
ler, William KeUy and MU- 
ton Hansen are expiring 
and the two-year unexpired 
term of Annalee Fjellberg 
who resigned will be filled- 

Ray Blakeman was ap- 
pointed to fill Mrs. Fjell- 
berg 's position until the 
April election. 

In order to qualify, a can- 
didate must on the date of 
his election be a citizen of 
the U.S. and 21 years of 
age or over, a resident of 



the State and territory which 
on the date of the election is 
included in Harper District 
512 which includes Barring- 
ton, Inverness, P a 1 a tin e, 
Schaumburg, Wheeling and 
Elk Grove townships. He 
must reside in this district 
one year prior to his elec- 
tion. 

A Harper student is there- 
fore qualified to run in the 
election . However, he must 
not be a member of a com- 
mon school board or a 
school treasurer. 

A petition signed by at 
least 50 voters or 10 per- 
cent of the yoters, which- 
ever is less, residing within 
the district is required in 
order for the petition to be 
filed. 

Recent le^lation requires 
that the candidate files a 
"Statement of Ek:onomic Ip- 
terest" wih the County 
Clerk's Offke. The statement 



must be filed before he takes 
the action necessary to at- 
tempt to qualify for nomin- 
ation. However, it is recom- 
mended that compliance 
with this filing require- 
ment precede the filing of the 
nominating papers so that 
the receipt issued by the 
County Clerk's Office can 
accompany the nomination 
papers. The appropriate 
form and full information 
as to the proper time, place 
and manner of filing are 
available to all candidates 
at the office of the County 
Clerk. Failure to comply 
with this requirement shall 
joepardize eligibility for 
the office. 

For further information 
concerning this process, 
prospective candidates are 
encouraged to contact W. J. 
Mann at his office, 397- 
3000, ext. 220. 



Instrument rating course 
offers preparation for FAA 



A course b^inning March 
26 at Harper College is de- 
signed to help private and 
commercial pilots prepare 
for the FAA written exami- 
nation in instrument rating. 

The ten- week course. "In 
strument Rating" (CEE 
016). will be held Tuesdays 
and Thursdays from 7pm 
to 10 pm through May 23, 
in room F-307. 

Registration may be made 



at the Continuing Education 
office Tuition is $42 for 
Harper district residents 
and $103 65 for others 

Students will receive 
training in the physiological 
and aerodynamic factors re- 
lated to instrument flying, 
basic instruments, attitude 
instrument flying, use of na- 
vigation instruments, and 
radio communications fa- 
cilities and equipment. 




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533 N. Hicks Rd 



(IN THE PALATINE IMALl.) 
(NEXT TO K MART) 



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FOR 

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Weekend Entertainment! 
"The Singing Strings'* 

(German zither music) 



COMPLETE FONDUE MENU 

Yes. we have sandwiches! 
As low as $1.50 



Cocittail Hours: 4-6:30 p.m.. 

MENTION -THE HARBINGER" 
AND RECEIVE A FREE GLASS ' 
OF BEER OR WINEWITHMRAL' 

BANQUET ROOMS for up to 20 PEOPI.E 



Air traffic control oper- 
ations and procedures will 
be discussed Use of com- 
puter and flight planning 
complements the curricu- 
lum, as does a review of 
FAA regulations. 

Instructor Roger Slisz 
holds the instrument ground 
instructor and" advanced 
ground instructor ratings as 
well as commercial, instru- 
ment, multi-engine and flight 
instructor ratings Chief 
pilot for the flying school 
at DuPage Airport, he has 
logged 4.300 hours of fligM. 



ICCB ok'8 



(From page 1) 

feet the balance of the pro- 
posed second site as these 
possible towns will be con- 
tribiting a small per cent of 
the population to the district. 
The land is owned by the 
Mayo foundation. The 146 
acre site is valued at apppro- 
ximately $12,000; depending 
on how the land will be zoned. 



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February 25.1974 



H 



H/RBINGER 



page 3 



Duo Pianists to perform here 



Duo pianists Melvin 
Stecher and Norman Horo- 
witz will present a concert 
at Harper College on Feb 
28. The concert will begin 
at 8 p.m. in the college cen- 
ter. 

Traveling with two per- 
fectly matched Steinways in 
» unique "music van," the 
duo- pianists performed in 
Seventy cities of the U.S 
and Canada and make exten- 
sive tours of Europe each 
season. During the past two 
decades, they have perform- 
ed a remarkable variety of 
new music as well as tradi- 
tional masterpieces for two 
pianos throughout the world 

The team founded the 
Stecher and Horowitz School 
of Music in Cedarhurst. Long 
Island ia 1960 Also com- 
posers, their series. 
"Learning to Play" and 
"Playing to Learn is used* 
for music teaching Their 
most recent publication is 
"Rock with Jazz, written 



for piano students They also 
conduct piano workshops 
throughout the country, dem- 
onstrating and lecturing on 
new methods and materials 
for teaching piano. 

Their program at Harper 
will include works by Bar- 
tok, Brahms. Chopin. 



Infante. Lutoslawski. Pas- 
quini and Saint -Saens Har- 
per students and staff are 
admitted free with ID 
cards. Public admission is 
$1 .50 for adults and 75 cents 
for students Tickets may be 
purchased through the stu- 
dent activities office, A-336. 




On Feb. 28, dao pianists Melvln Stecher and Norman 
Horowitz wlU appear in concert here. 



[lectrified bhegrass band i« toncert 
HHission HHonatain Wowlband 



The "Mission Mountain 
Wood Band", which has been 
called the greatest electric 
blue grass band inthe world, 
will present a concert. Wed- 
nesday, February 27. at noon 
In the Lounge The concert 
is free. 

The group consists of 
Steve Riddle. Rob Quist. 
Greg Reichberg and Terry 
Robinson, w+io are all from 
Montana, and Christian 



Johnson, who is from 
Nevada Steve sings leadand 
harmony and plays the bass. 
Rob alsosingsaridplays ban- 
jo, electric guitar, flute and 
mouth harp Greg is the 
percussionist, and Terry is 
acoustic guitarist Christian 
is the lead guitarist and also 
plays mandolin and sings 
harmonv 

Mission Mountain has a 




Harper students can tune their ears in on blue grass 
melodies, free in the lounge. 



Nousecleaiiinc 



(Cont from Page i) 

ound ' are obviously poor 
excuses for a voiding the in- 
evitable: either a ciiange 
of attitude in this officer 

or his impeachment How- 
ever, if reasons such as the 
above do have any truth to 
them, you the student body 
should be questioning what 
type of leaders you vote into 
office 

Even though the majority 
dT' the -Senate is trying to 
be effective in representing 
the Student body, there are 
those select few. whoby their 
own apathetic attitudes hap- 
pen to hinder the potential of 



the Senate as a whole It 
is time the senators did 
some housecleaning by re- 
moving the few that a re pre- 
venting the Senate from fun- 
ctioning in a way the student 
body wants and deserves 



"hoedown sound" that will 
set you stomping your feet 
and clapping your hands. 



Photo contest 

By G. ANDERSON 

From March 18 to .March 
22 there will be an exhibition 
of color and black and white 
photographs by the students 
of Harper College. All work 
will be submitted by students. 
Judged and then shown in 
the exhibit during the week 
of the 18th. Any student can 
submit any number of 
photos that he or she wishes 
to have exhibited. 

The minimum size for 
photos will be 8" x 10", 
but any size larger will be 
accepted. 

First, second and third 
place prizes will be award- 
ed to photos picked by the 
judges. The showing is ten- 
tatively scheduled in F- 
Building, Ist floor. All en- 
tries should be turned in 
to the Student Activities Of- 
fice, A336. The deadline is 
March 13 so there's plenty 
of time to submit a photo. 
So take a couple shots, it's 
a snap. , 



for the best buy on your 
New or Used KONOMY CAR 

SEE— Jim Dvorak 

AT TOYOTA & VOL\/0 VILLAGE 
ROUTE 31 SO ELGIN ILL 741 2100 



GLEND^R 
OFEl^EMS 

On Campus — 

Ron Miyamura, priest at the Midwest Buddhist Temple 
on Chicago's north side, will lecture to the Human- 
ities classes at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. on Wed., Feb. 27 
in E-106. All interested persons are welcome to at- 
tend. He will also meet with the evening class at 6:30 
p.m. in D-210. He will discuss what it means to be a 
Buddhist and ponder the question, "What can the 
Western world learn from the East" 
Concert, featuring "Mission Mountain Wood Band", 

Feb. 27, 12 noon. Lounge, free. 
Shident Senate Mtg., Feb. 28, 12:30 p.m., A-242A. 
Concert, duo-pianists Stecher & Horowitz, 8:00 p.m., 

Lounge. 
FUm, "Play Misty For Me", with CUnt Eastwood & 

Jesska Walter, Mar. 1, 8:00 p.m., B-106. 
Hockey, Harper vs. Moraine Valley at R.M.S.C., Mar. 

2. 4:30 p.m. 
Mini<our8es— 
Juggling, Feb. 26 & 28. 12 noonl:50 p.m., A-242A. 
Learn basics of juggling, Demonstrations & ideas 
for your own tricks. Kach participant must bring 
3 balls. 
Transcendental Meditation, Mar. 5 & 7, 12 noon- 
1:50 p.m.. A-242-A. Discussion of what transcen- 
dental meditation is, what It can do for you & how 
it differs from other systems, also the mechanics of 
transcendental meditation and a fUm presentation. 

Moslc- 

Burt Bacharach, Feb. 22-24, Arte Crown. 

Kngelbert Humperdinck. Mar. 1-10, Mill Run Theatre. 

Stephen Stills, Mar. 8, Auditorium Theatre. 

Joel Gray, Auditorium, Mar. 12. 

The Letter men. Arte Crown, Mar. 16. 

Seals & Crofts, Mar. 16-17, Arte Crown. 

Poco, Auditorium Theatre, Mar. 24. 

Theabre— 

•To Be Young, Gifted and Black", Goodman, Ph. 

236-2337. 
"Awake and Sing", Forum Theatre. Ph. 496-3000. 
"Waltz of the Toreadors", at the Blackstone. Ph. ST 

2-2280. 
"That Championship Season", at the Studebaker, Ph. 

922-2973. 
"No Sex- Please, We're British ", Pheasant Run. Ph. 
.684-1454. 
"The Odd Couple", with Art Carney & Don Knotts, 

until Mar. 3, at Arlington Park Theatre. 
"One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest", with James F'ar- 

entlno, returns to ArUngton Park, Mar. 7 • April 7. 

Ph. 392-6800. 




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This amaJing device, small enough for you' purse, is set 
off by your touch (or his) and produces »ri en' shattering 
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Comes m a complete kit for use on doors, windows and 
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NAME 

ADORfSS. 

CITY 



.STATE. 



.^IP_ 



^ 



^• 



\J 



page 4 



K 



H>I^NGER 



February 28.1974 February 25 1974 



T€ 



H>f?BfNGER 



page 5 



ouTPur 





^ mm* 



INPUT 



Spring housecleaning needed 



Last weeks editorial pro- 
posed steps that the student 
body could take to streng- 
then student gm'ernment on 
campus. It was the hope 
that by following these guide- 
lines, some of the apathetic 
viewpoints toward the Senate 
might be changed 

This week wehavedecided 
to take the issue of apathy 
-per se from a second point 
of view. The attention of 
this editorial shall there- 
fore be directed to the Stu- 
dent Senate at Harper, and 
hew you the student may view 
your government 

The Student Senate at 
Harper happens to have in its 
-membership some individual 
senators, who ironically en- 
ough happen to be just as 
apathetic as they claim the 
student body to be. 

It is by care fill and se- 
lect reviewing that this con- 
clusion has come about 

It |)Bs taken a full semes- 
ter for some of the Senators 
^ adjust to their roles, by 
this we mean that they un- 
derstand and do what is re- 
quired of them. For awhile 
there had been a handful of 
progressing senators who 
virtually have been holding 
the Senate together 

In the past month the Se- 
nate has lost two senators 
Stacey Bueschel who re- 
signed and Doug Janis who 
was renwved. The question 
that the student body would 
likely raise is why'' Why 
would a senator run for an 



office knowing that they 
might transfer to another 
college? Could it be that 
it locks good on their re- 
cord, or transcripts? 

The Senate is currently 
burdened with two unfortu- 
nate situations Thesesitua- 
tions bluntly spell out apathy 
We can bet odds that Steve 
Bowman will probably be 
the third senator to be ab- 
andoning the Senate this 
year The Senate was not 
aware of his desertion until 
they checked the registar 
and found that he was no lon- 
ger enrolled at Harper. The 
Senate is still unable tocon- 
tact Mr Bowman as of this 
writing 

A more vital problem that 
the Senate still faces is a 
Vice President who is not 
functioning properly Hisin- 
V olvement and i nte rest i n Se - 
nate affairs has been so niU 
that some may wonder why 
the Senators who are aware 
of tl\is problem did not re- 
move him from office a long 
time ago 

There has been talk of 
impeachingthisofficeror put- 
ting him on probation This 
suggestion on the part of 
some Senators has been 
going around since the be- 
ginning of fall semester, but 
as of this writing, no action 
has been taken on this mat 
ter 

Reasons such as "given 
enough time he II come ar 

(Turn to paxe .!> 



Soul brothers handshake sets off 
student^s view of 'Hhe system 



99 




K 



H/f^NGER 




Editor-ln-chlef 
Business Manager 
Activities Editor 
Photographers 



Diane DiBartolomeo 
Gary Zdeb 
Heidi Johnson 
Chuck Zemeske, Dan Kliar- 
sky. Ken Kissam 
Steve Schlosser, Juan Nunez 
Contributing Staff 
Greg Conway, Larry Frederich. Rich Kusnierek, Glenn 
Lewin, Sue Pollack, Dennis Soboj, Kayo Oleskevlch. 
Advisor: Mr. Sturdevant 



Cartoonists 



The HAKHINGKR is the student publication for the 
Harper College campus community, published wetkiy 
except during holidays and midterms. All opinions ex 
pressed on the editorial page or in the columns are 
those of the writer, and are not necessarily those of the 
college, its administration, faculty or studen< body. 
For information on advertising, rates and publica- 
tion schedule, call or write Harbinger Business Of- 
fice. 
William 



Rainey Harper College, /Mgonquin and 
Roselle Rds., Palatine, Illinois 60067. Phone 
b^r .397-3000. cxt. 272 and 460 



nuni- 



For the past few months. 
I have been involved in the 
pursuit of an education at 
Harpvard Junior College lo- 
cated in Snow covered South- 
ern Palastine in the state of 
111 

During the course of my 
pursuit of this folly, I came 
across the opportunity to in - 
terview Mr. Boardasorus 
Administratus. one of the 
higher ups inthat insittution 
Just exactly what his po- 
sition was I am not sure of, 
bii the more I found out 
about him, the less I wanted 
to know. 

Our meeting was just one 
of those typical interview 
meetings that one has 

"Mr Administratus," I 
said as I entered the room, 
"My name is Dr Gonzo, " 
(for various reasons. I 
choose to remain one of those 
unknown personalities that 
writes crank letters to news- 
papers ) 

"Dr Gonzo. it is truly" 
fine to meet you " He said, 
and offered his hand in a soul 
brothers handshake 

The lights were almost 
blinding off of his well po- 
lished bald head, and he apo- 
logized, saying 'My hair is 
out being cleaned " 

He offered to take me on a 
tour of the campus, to the 
places where I as a student 
had not been aware of. and to 
explain to me why so many 
people were involved in the 
job of turning out educated 
individuals 

The first place where we 
stopped was the future plans 
office. where plans are 
hashed out concerning the fu- 
ture of the institution While 
my stay in this room was 
rather short. I was able to 
listen in while three fags, 
and a truck driver (Who was 
making a delivery, and de- 
cided to join in) were dis- 
cussing the colors for the 
washrooms. 

The truck driver was In 
favor of btack. while the fags 
were arguing over puce, 
blue, and yellow. 



"I don't care what you 
silly people say. blue goes 
good with my hair. I'm a 
natural blonde you know " 

Two doors down, one past 
the executive washrooms, 
there was the faculty grie 
vance committee, where the 
faculty could come In. and 
talk to a member of the ad- 
ministration 

In this room, was one of 
the most promising sights 
that I saw on thetour There 



e sting part of the tour. The 
paper room " 

When he opened the door. 
I was totally amazed at the 
amount of paper that was in 
this room Loads of it. 
ream after ream. 

There we re three people in 
this room People who did 
nothing but run around 
screaming Paper, gotta 
have more paper ' ' 

When asked what these 
papers pertained to. Bored 




was one of the faculty mem- 
bers, a bearded fellow, who 
locks a lot like Santa Claus, 
talking to a member of the 
administration It lookedas 
if things were goingsmooth 
ly, as every time the bearded 
fellow spoke, the admini- 
st'-ation membersaid. "Yes. 
I agree or Some action 
will be taken on that later.' 

It wasn't until later on in 
the tour, that I discovered 
that the administration mem- 
ber who was I istening was to- 
tally deat. and that he really 
had no idea what the faculty 
member was saying 

By this time. I was on a 
first name basis with Mr 
Administratus. calling him 
Bore, and him calling me 
Doctor 

"Ah Doctor " Bore said, 
"Now we come to the inter - 



The article that appeared 
in the February 18 issue of 
the HARBINGER entitled 
"Senators to be appointed 
by Senate " had a faulty cap 
tion with its picture The 
caption that read 'Due to 
lack of voter turnout at the 
polls. Student Senate Pres 
Robert Hayhurst has selec- 
ted to appoint the new se- 
nators " The implication 
was interpreted differently 
by many The present con - 
sittution states that general 



elections will beheld if there 
are three of more vacancies 
If there are less than three 
vacancies, the Senate mem- 
bers shall be replaced by 
any student petitioning to SS 
HC and shall be accepted 
by a majority of votes cast 

bv the Senate 

• 

/* rmi pnffH^ isaim. 
CMtsimrn Ttmr mry n*c 

10* fvnit* <amr««K <«r> I 

ewWrOM! Mrs iOMC Pnvic^ 




replied 'No one really 
knows, bit to run efficiently, 
you have to have paper mov- 
ing, and this room is set 
aside for just that purpose. 
We move a lot of paper here, 
we are efficient ' 

In thenext room, there was 
the student grievance room, 
a room where the students 
could come in. and get their 
gripes off of their chests 
This room was almost iden- 
tical to the one for the fa- 
culty, except that there was 
no one thereotherthan a stu- 
dent who was idly talkingto 
a wall about the price of 
books in the bookstore, and 
the exorbitant fee he paid 
for registration 

The last room contained 
the activities board In this 
room, the students were al- 
lowed to come in. and relax 
The walls were barren, there 
was nothing on tht> floor, 
and everything was white 
Four walls were painted 
white: the ceiling and floor 
were black Typical stu- 
dent activity Nothing to do 
Slowly bit surely, the 
shape of things were coming 
to me the college was 

being run by those who were 
hired due to unknown pur- 
poses, and who would remain 
separated from the people 
they serve as long as they 
could. 

. Why not, is this not the 
system of American Educa- 
tion today? 

Name Withheld 



This is the introduction of 
a seven part series covering 
peer counseling In the fol 
lowing articles a personality 
sketch will be presented on 
each peer counselor 



Peer Counselors reach out to students' needs 



By DIANE DIBARTOLOMEO 

A rare breed of concer- 
ned students are involved in 
an outreach program to ex 
tend counseling services to 
better meet the needs of Har 
per students 

The Peer Counseling Pro- 
gram, which started two 
years ago last spring, is 
thought fairly innovative by 
project coordinators Anne 
Rodgers. Dennis Brokke and 
Nahby Fojo are this year's 
coordinators of theprogram 
Ms. Anne Rodgers. one of 
the PC coordinators. poin- 
ted out that there are not 
many PC Programs at 
other colleges Harper is 
one of the few colleges that 
provides such a service to 
its students 

Being able to relate to 
peers may come easier for 
students than having to turn 
to professional counselors 
Peer Counselors provide an 
alternative for increased 
student contact 

Initiating a conversation 
or just providing a good lis- 
tening ear is the warm ap- 
proach the counselors prac- 
tice to meet other peers 
The PC s go through a 
three week training session, 
where they become well in- 
formed about all aspects of 
Harpjcr They can letvl a 
supporting hand for students 
seeking job placement, aid 
with course selection or re 



fer them to sources which 
might be helpful. in reaching 
a decision to overcome a 
problem 

Students often have com 
mon concerns and needs 
which can be met through the 
efforts of trained peercoun 
selors Some of the services 
which can be performed by 
peer counselors are as 
sisting students in locating 
vocational and career infor 
mation, interpreting the ca 
talogue and degree require- 
ments to students, be- 
friending lonely students by 
eating lunch with them, by 
introducing them to other 
students and by giving them 
support and encouragement 
Peer counselors, in short 
relate the message to siu 
dents who are unaware of 
the services available to 
them. 

For the returning women 
students a coffee hour is 
sponsored by one of the peer 
counselors Joyce Stevens, 
also a returning student be 
lieves that during the hour 
the womencan exchange con- 
versation on problems the 
the returning housewives 
and mothers have 

The Peer Counselors meet 
regularly with professional 
counselors to review the 
p rogram s p rogress 

Currently there are six 
peer counselors in the pro 
gram, of which all are full 
time Harper students If 
the budget wasnt limited Ms 
Rodgers would have liked to 
have seen more PCs in 
the program 

The six peer counselors 
are Keith Berndtson.lackii- 
Ehlebracht. Barb Km r\ 



haveto 




We doni think sot 



A HTWII colta^ hn many bcrwfiti not louno ft • larft unrvtriitv Tfkt our facullv for 
•lumpl*. if»v «r« «t Aurora Coltoga to »•<* - not imt to puWrah, not to juit do 
mtni\. Th»ir tfforti tn oono>nlr«t«d on niching After all. that's what collafa i< all 
about. Aurora providn opporturMtwi hi* at itudcfft imtiatad ctcgraei. «»orli ttudy 
provamt. intamthijM, aixl i n daptmlWW maarch lohrch a"** v«j a ch»ne» to ba 
yourwif not luit a numfaar. If you'd lika to iom a «nall group of paopla dotnf txf 
thinga, (o<n u<. 

N« | ili an wtiM w'm ill atout . . . 




For information cat) or iwriia 
Otractor of Admittiont 



Greg Rausch, B*'rnie Sch 
wartz and Joyce Stevens 
Ms Rodgers expressed 
that she enjoys working with 
these peer counselors The 
group is varied and is pretty 
represenative of the Harper 
student body I see them as 
effective and collective as 
part of a successful pro 
gram There is flexibiiitv. 
said Ms Rodgers 

The PCs reach studtnts 
by setting up a tabh* with 



regular days and hours or 
by "roving" Roving in 
yolves lounging around dur - 
ing free hours where stu- 
dents congregate It is a 
major part of the outreach 
program The PCs put 
twenty hours a week into 
this endeavor 

Some of the full time peer 
counselors are interested in 
taking up Counselingor Psy- 
chology as a career Others, 
like anyone else are unsure 



of their major fields 

Their interest in you, and 
their warm personalities 
will surely concide with you 
someday So don t be sur 
prised if someday soon one 
of Harpers peer counselors 
come up to you and strikes 
up a friendly conversation 

Next week a personality 
sketch on Bernie Schwartz, 
a peer counselor veteran 
from last year 




Clockwise, starting from left: Keith Bemdison. Anne Rodgers, Barb 
Emery. Bernie Schwartz. Greg Rausch and Joyce Stevens. Not pictured 
is Julie Ehlebracht. (Photo bv Gail Sundberg) 



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'. 1 



./■ 



page 6 



Achievement 

(Cont from Page 2) 



^H/IRBINGER 



February 25. I974 February 25. 1973 



f€ 



"Harper has been a growing 
place for me. Its really 
been beneficial to me It 
serves my needs and the 
needs of the community for 
people like me. Beingolder, 
it is a perfect spot for me 
and I can still maintain a 
family. It was important 
for me to get my education 
as soon as possible to gel 
in the worit field. It has 
really met all my needs." 
Mary has filure plans of 
working at Columbus Hospi 
tal in Chicago She says 
that the salary is fantastic 
and the work experience is 
exceUent She will start 
working her Intership Pro- 
gram on July 15. for twelve 
weeks 

A Criminal Justice Major 
in his second year at Har- 
per was also recognized as 
acheiving his goals Ken 
Krzywlcki is married and 
has two children 

Under a Leep g rant the fe - 
deral government is paying 
for his education Because 
he Is entering the field of 
Law Enforcement, the go- 
vernment will pay for his 
edicatlon Presently Ken is 
• police officer with Elk 
Grove He is on the Motor- 
cycle unit of the patrol di- 
vision and has been with Elk 
Grove for four and a half 
yetrs. 



He was attracted to the 
career program at Harper 
because he not only wanted 
to be trained as an acting 
policeman but also wanted 
to think as one. "By get- 
ting a masters in Law En- 
forcement not only will I 
provide future security for 
my family, bi* it will be a 
definite asset to the people 
in the community that 1 
serve." said Ken 

He credits his policechief 
with having a part in en- 
couraging him to continue 
his education. "Our chief. 
Harry P Jenkins and our 
Lt. William Kohi*e also a 
gnAtate of Harper are both 



highly educated." 

Ken would like to work 
within the state of Illinois, 
preferably Cook County. 

Ken concluded saying, 
'I have a wife, two kids, 
one dog, two cars and bills 
like everyone else. ' ' 

Both students will go on 
to the district competition, 
which is to be held March 
14-26. The 12 winners from 
this level will receivea$250 
cash award and a plaque. 
They will also go on to the 
state level competiU on. Ap- 
ril 24. Two sute winners 
are chosen and presented 
with a $1,000 check and a 
trophy on April 25. 



Hawks close season 



In their last game of the 
season, the Hawks hustled, 
but not quite enough as they 
lost to Wright Junior Col- 
lege. 75-61. 

The Hawks, who have been 
plagued with injuries and 
ineligibilities, were never 
really in the game from the 
beginning The closest they 
ever came was sbc points 
at half-time, bit that was 



their best effort. 

Thojgh playing without 
some of their better play- 
ers, the Hawks did a good 
job beating Oakton. 78-74 

Coach Bechtold said of the 
game, "We hustled through- 
out the game, and that ssays 
a lot when you lose one of 
your best players. They still 
stuck in there." 



5 Matmea advnme 



(Coat from Page S) 



made his advancement to the 
finals seemingly unctel- 
lenged At 118 he pinned 
McHenrys Bruce Parker at 
3 39 and then topped Jim 
Shannon of Danville 16-6 
The triumph was by a 5-3 
coint over Matt Boyle of Jo- 
liet 

Gordon and Vylasek lud 
runnerup finishes 

Taking fourths for the 
Hawks were Mike Millayat 
142 and Ken Trommer at 
158 

Frankovlcs pins leading 



Into the finals were over Joe 
Froliger of the Blackhawks 
at 3:15 Ron Smith of Park- 
land at 1:49 and John Chit- 
tenden or DuPage at 2:57. 
The (inal scoring of the 
Region 'IV tournament was 
the Blackhawks with 117 
points. Harper with 109. Jo- 
llet with 107-1/2. and Tri- 
ton last weeks Skyway Con- 
ference meet champ. In 
fourth with 93-1 2. 




In their last 
camp of (hp 
spa.soB. 
Chris Mielke 
COPS up for 
■ futile (wo 
PointJi against 
*riifht Junior 
Collpge. 

(Photo by 

thuch Zemeske) 




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^ and by the way - don t forget to ask for your 
Harper student discount 



101 WEST PROSPECT AVE MT PROSPECT IL 
1 block west of Rts 14 & 83 259-0470 



(From page 1) 

new program is designed to 
draw from many segments of 
the student population 

"Recent high school gra- 
duates without clear educa- 
tional goals may enroll to 
sample a variety at cur- 
riculum offerings." Dr 
Birkholzsald "Maturestu- 
dents who wish to custom de- 
si,in and sequence their own 
learning experiences are 



9l§w S§§r§§s §ff§r9d 

seeking this kind of flexible 
program " 

The uniqueness of this 
program is that it does not 
focus on a parUcular type of 
student bi* can provide an 
alternate educational plan to 
an extremely heterogeneous 
population 

Persons interested in the 
liberal studiesdegree should 
contact Dean Birkholz at 
397-3000. extension 222 




. (From page 8) 

convienent corner when they 
were delivered 

The ice itself was soft, 
not fast in fact, it wasslow. 
The whole atmosphere of the 
arena is one that wns de- 
signed for figure skating, 
with hockey thrown in af- 
terwards. 

When the Harper Club fi 
nally took the ice almost half 
an hour late, and after i 
minutes of warm up tim< . 
they were immediately as 
sesed with u 2 minute ix-nch 
penality for arriving latv 
Now. the Kani • began with 
the Harper Club one man 
short from the beginning, 
their whole team not yet on 
the bench, and for the most 
part cold. \»1thuut warm up 
It did not Uke DuPage long 
to capitalize on these cir 
cumstances. as 25 seconds 
into the gami-. th«'yt<u*;a I 
lead on a shot from Ermine 
Trulo. getting help from 
Randy Frohlich. and Steve 
Ruck 

With Mar|H-rlM.iy<>rsarri 
ving througlKHU the first pe- 
riod, and taking the icecold. 
they wrn- M>\f to keep l)u 
Page from iloing any further 
damage, and ihi- buzzirtnd 
ed the period with the score 
DuPtge I. Harper r» 
The HarpiT ftffense final- 



ly got warmed up early in 
the second period- when Win- 
ger Tom Langer tied the 
game with his first «oal of 
the afternoon at 2 Of) As- 
isting on the play was Cen- 
ter Dave Connelly Onemin 
ute and four seconds later. 
Kevin Bowens. receivingas- 
sistance from Dennis S«jboj. 
and Paul Buck put th« Har- 
per Club out from _ ! MO 
ring at 3 09 

The Harper i. ...! vu.^ d 
be short livi-dhowcvt r when 
at 4 2K .Jinj Kennedy uas 
able to get the puck past 
Harper (loalifnder Marc 
Caslin A tinnuti' and two 
seconds laur Dui 'age once 
again took the lead on a shot 
by Randy Frohlich with an 
assist goin« in .»iit ve Ruck, 
making the score DuPage 
3. Harper 2 

It should bf noted here 
that Harper (KialLmlers 
Marc Caslin. and Tim Paul 
sen did an excellent job 
against DuPago and Triton 
respectively, and that Carl 
Dehlia has done an excellent 
job in the action he has seen 
this season The Harper 
goaltenders are one of the 
reasons that the Harper Hnr 
key Club have been able to do 
so well this season 

The DuPage fans were ju 
bllant after their last goal. 
bi« this jubilation was to be 



H/4RBINGER 



Hockey Club beots DuPage 



short lived, as Tom Langer 
teamed up once again with 
Dave Connelly to tie the 
score at 3-3. 6:15 into the 
period 

At 7 46 into the second 
period, the Harper Club was 
again able to take the lead 
when Dennis Soboj. and Ke 
vin Bowenes assisted Paul 
Buck with his first goal of 
the afternoon, and the final 
goal of the period 

The remainder of the se- 
cond period was filled with 
defensive action as neither 
team was able to keep the 
puck iniheir opponents zone 
for long 

Neither team was able to 
score, and neither team was 
able to mount any real of 
fensive drives, or constant 
pressure. 

The buzzer sounded at the 
end of the second period with 
the score 4 3 in favor qf 
the Harper Club 

Hockey is a Varsity Sport 
at the College of DuPage 
Perhaps this is one o* the 
reasons why they are ranked 
as the number one Junior 
College team in the State 
This is a fact that has been 
with us for the past two 
years DuPage is number 
one For some reason, the 
Harper Hockey Club is not 
ranked 
This year, we have defea- 



ted DuPage We have beaten 
the best The Club this year 
has defeated every team they 
have played, compiling a re- 
cord of 10- 1 (the only team 
that has beaten them is 
DuPage) They have am- 
massed 84 goals, limiting 
their opponents to 30. 

The Club wanted to win 
Perhaps this is why during 
the third period, they were 
able to hold DuPage at bay, 
and protect their one point 
lead 

For 15 minutes, the Har- 
per defense protected their 
net. and when the buzzer end 
ing the game sounded, the 
the Harper team emergedas 
victors of a hard fought 
game 

The final score 4-3. 



STATISTICS 

TRITON GAME 

Tom Langer 
Dave Connelly 
Steve Bird 
John Rebora 
Paul Buck 
Kevin Llo 



page 



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DUPAGE GAME 

Tom Langer 
Dave Connelly 
Dennis SoboJ 
Paul Buck 
tfKevin Bowens 



2 

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page 8 



T€ 



H/4RBINGER 



February25, 1974 



By L. R. KIEL 



Hockey Club beats noJ DuPage 



In what had been billed 
as the biggest week-end of 
action for the Harper Hockey 
Club, the club was able to 
defeat Triton College, and 
the College of DuPage. 

Since the publication of the 
Birds of Prey column and 
the Puck Comments Column 
dealing with conditions at the 
Rolling Meadows Sports 
Complix. the ice there has 
greatly improved. 



This factor helped to pro 
vide the fans with. some so- 
lid l[lockey action against 
Triton Saturday 

With 6 11 gone in the first 
period of action. Harper's 
Dave Connelly opened the 
scoring, only to see the score 
tied as 7:34 when Joe Laino, 
with an assist from Di 
Cacove, got the puck past 
Tim Paulsen 

For the remainder of the 
period, the Harper Club was 
able to put up a good attack. 




Al Sledel. (#3) watches as Steve Bird <*11) scores 

winning third period goal against Triton. (Photo 
by L. R. Kiel). 



combining good defense with 
goals at 10:37 by Paul Buck 
with an assist going to John 
Rebora, and at 10 51 bySteve 
Bird with an assist from 
Dave Connelly. 

When the buzzer sounded 
ending the first period, the 
Harper Club was sitting on 
top of a 3-1 lead 

The act that the Harper 
Club was able to put together 
in the first period, came off 
a little rougher in the se- 
cond period 

Fortunately, the Triton 
team was unable to capita- 
lize on the let down nrwre 
than twice, with goals coming 
at 6 23 by DiCacove with 
assists from RossCapaccio. 
and Joe Laino. and at 19 06. 
by Dave Wunderle, assisted 
by Dennis Moore, and Rich 
Brennan 

These two goals made the 
score Harper 3. Triton 3. 
at the end of two periods 
With visions of last years 
final meeting of the two 
teams going through the 
heads of those fans who 
were at last years game. 
(The game was a 2-2 tie at 
the end of regulation play, 
and went into overtime with 



the Harper Club finally win- 
ning 3-2) The fans watched 
14:21 of the final period tick 
away before Steve Bird, 
using a play that Coach Bob 
Downing had introduced the 
day before, scored 

Hawk defensenuin Kevin 
Lio was awarded an assist 
on the play, making iht- (\nu\ 
score 4-3 

Then came DuI'iik^'. 

The mood for the DuPuge 
game was set on tht* second 
day of February this year, 
when the Harper Club suf- 
fered it's only loss of the 
season to date, in front of 
over 100 hockey fans at the 
Rolling Meadows Sports 
Complex 

TTie score in that game 
was 4-2. and sinceihat time, 
the team, and fans were look- 
ing forward to a rematch 

After being informed that 



( 



the game was to start at i 
pm in the ice arena m 
Downers Grove, the majority 
of the team. fans, and th»' 
like arrived shortly after 
noon. 

When we arrived. wewer»' 
informed that the gam«' wus 
scheduled by DuPage to start 
at noon, and that we were 
late 

The Ice Arena in Dui^age 
has got to be one of thi- 
worst facilities that grac»s 
this area The locker rooms 
are small, and there is little 
room to walk between the 
boards and the wall Miiileune 
makes his way from the lob- 
by to the locker rooms Sea 
ting capacity is limited to 
a small art-a be*-!:!!! <,iu- (ii 
the nets, almost ds if »f.«'y 
never planned \u hiiv« li|« j 
chers. but stuck ihrm iiiti..» 

(Turn to page 7) 



HUicA 



By DENNIS SOBOJ 



Harper sends five matmen 
to national cliampionsllip 



Harper qualified five in 
dividuals for the National 
Junior College wrestling 
championships at Moline 

Coach Ron Bessemer's 
squad placed second place at 
the 16- team Region IV tour- 
nament, losing out by an 
eight -point margin to hosting 
Biackhawk College 

Harper will send Al Gor- 
don, Ron Vlyasek. Steve 
Glasder. Steve Frankovic 
and Bernie Kleinman to 
Wrolhington. Minnesota on 
February 28 for the national 
meet 

Nine of the ten Harper 
wrestlers finishedamongthe 
top five in their respective 
brackets 

JOBS 

EUROPE 



Frankovic wrestlingat 167 
weight class took four 
straight pins, turning back 
Triton's Frank Urso at 6 26 
in the championship bout 



A triple triumph by Ber- 
nie Kleiman (228) over Mc 
Hnery. Danville and Joliet 



(IWatoPagv 




One of our wrestlers trying 
(Photo by Wayne Henry). 



to take an opponent 






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I can remember, in the 
beginning of the sea.son. the 
hockey tryoiAs and skating 
around looking at all the 
players trying tofigureout if 
this could be a good team 
By this I mean was there 
more than Just a half dozen 
or so good players Thesuc- 
cess o<f any hockey team is 
built around a base of three 
strong forward lines By 
the time the season started, 
the lines werepickedand this 
is how the Hawks Hockey 
I'eam was rounded out 

The Third Line Offense 
and Defense 

Jody Kosec. Left Wing A 
sparky character, who at 
times seems to be lost out 
there on the ice Jody is 
ore of the most improved 
players on the team Play- 
ing good position and ap- 
plying his talents He pil 
forth goodeffortagainstTri 
ton. applying pressure and 
holding back the Warriors 
while the first two lines 
were catching a breather 
Kevin Bowans. Center 
Kevin anchored the third line 
this year and was respon 
sible for moving it A good 
skater and playmaker In 
the game against DuPag»' 
Bowans moved up to cen 
ter the second line after 
John Rebora drew a mis- 
conduct penalty Kevin \icA 
the second goal and assisted 
the third 

Sven Overland. Right 
Wing Sven joined the team 
after the season started 
When he began coming to 
practices, it was a little 
different for him He had 
to prove himself He has 
an awkward uprighi stride 
that surprisingly doesn t 
distract from his speed and 
he can shoot well. Against 



DuPage he turned in a good 
performance when Steve 
Br id was injured and couldn't 
play 

Tom Knecht. Left defense 
Tom was unnoticed through 
the beginning of the season 
and didn't get much chance 
to play It wasn't till the 
rematch with Morton College 
that Tom got an opportunity 
Tom's energy sparked a sag- 
ging defense, especially 
since he is the smallest